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NEWS
June 16, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gunman slightly wounded Serbia's most powerful opposition leader, Vuk Draskovic, late Thursday with a burst of automatic weapons fire at a coastal vacation home in the Yugoslav republic of Montenegro, police and aides to the politician said today. Members of Draskovic's Serbian Renewal Movement called the 11:30 p.m. shooting an assassination attempt, the second in less than a year on the longtime foe of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Draskovic, 53, was hit by two bullets.
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NEWS
June 17, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police in Montenegro said Friday that they arrested two men who had shot and wounded a leading opponent of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic the night before in an apparent spread of Serbia's lethal politics to its more peaceful sister republic. The tantalizing announcement on Montenegrin Television's evening news said the police "know who ordered this crime" but did not yet want to tell the public.
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NEWS
May 7, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vuk Draskovic casts his penetrating black eyes toward the heavens and dashes spread fingers through his tangled dreadlocks in a plaintive, exasperated gesture. He grips the microphone with both hands, seals shut the eyes that are windows on torment and launches into a diatribe on the evils of communism. His riveted disciples follow his lead in kissing the sacred soil of Serbia, then chant his name and flash the three-fingered symbol of his staunchly nationalist party.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gunman slightly wounded Serbia's most powerful opposition leader, Vuk Draskovic, late Thursday with a burst of automatic weapons fire at a coastal vacation home in the Yugoslav republic of Montenegro, police and aides to the politician said today. Members of Draskovic's Serbian Renewal Movement called the 11:30 p.m. shooting an assassination attempt, the second in less than a year on the longtime foe of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Draskovic, 53, was hit by two bullets.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Yugoslav government accused opposition leader Vuk Draskovic of conspiring with the French intelligence service to try to topple President Slobodan Milosevic. "Draskovic had several talks with the French intelligence . . . and in 1999 offered to cooperate with any foreign service for an adequate amount of money," Information Minister Goran Matic said.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | From Reuters
Serbian opposition leader Vuk Draskovic said a car crash Sunday that he survived but that killed his brother-in-law and three bodyguards was an assassination attempt. Draskovic, leader of the Serbian Renewal Movement, suffered only minor injuries when the car he was traveling in collided with a truck coming from the opposite direction that suddenly swerved into the wrong side of the road. "It is an assassination attempt.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
Slobodan Milosevic's Socialist Party claimed victory early today in Serbian elections, a vote many of his opponents boycotted because they said it was rigged. "It is obvious that our party has a substantial lead in both the presidential and parliamentary elections," party spokesman Ivica Dacic said. Preliminary results were expected this afternoon. Milosevic, who controls the state media, was expected from the beginning to see his party triumph in Sunday's vote.
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massacre of 14 farmers in Kosovo gave new ammunition to a prominent opposition leader Saturday in his efforts to gain support among the Serbian people and drive Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic from power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1999
Slobodan Milosevic's days as president of Yugoslavia seem to be numbered. Huge crowds attend anti-Milosevic rallies and his allies in the cabinet are deserting him. A leading opponent gave him 15 days to resign or face massive street demonstrations when students and workers return from summer vacations.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police in Montenegro said Friday that they arrested two men who had shot and wounded a leading opponent of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic the night before in an apparent spread of Serbia's lethal politics to its more peaceful sister republic. The tantalizing announcement on Montenegrin Television's evening news said the police "know who ordered this crime" but did not yet want to tell the public.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Yugoslav government accused opposition leader Vuk Draskovic of conspiring with the French intelligence service to try to topple President Slobodan Milosevic. "Draskovic had several talks with the French intelligence . . . and in 1999 offered to cooperate with any foreign service for an adequate amount of money," Information Minister Goran Matic said.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | From Reuters
Serbian opposition leader Vuk Draskovic said a car crash Sunday that he survived but that killed his brother-in-law and three bodyguards was an assassination attempt. Draskovic, leader of the Serbian Renewal Movement, suffered only minor injuries when the car he was traveling in collided with a truck coming from the opposite direction that suddenly swerved into the wrong side of the road. "It is an assassination attempt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1999
Slobodan Milosevic's days as president of Yugoslavia seem to be numbered. Huge crowds attend anti-Milosevic rallies and his allies in the cabinet are deserting him. A leading opponent gave him 15 days to resign or face massive street demonstrations when students and workers return from summer vacations.
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massacre of 14 farmers in Kosovo gave new ammunition to a prominent opposition leader Saturday in his efforts to gain support among the Serbian people and drive Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic from power.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The once-fiery opposition leader Vuk Draskovic, in his first political rally in more than two years, called Saturday on Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and his political machine in Belgrade to resign and make way for a transition government of "independent Serbian experts" to rebuild this war-torn country.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few familiar with Bogoljub Arsenijevic's work in this battered Serbian industrial city were surprised this week when the local icon painter took center stage in a mounting national movement to drive Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic from power. Perhaps it was his 1992 sculpture depicting Milosevic as a giant red phallus.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long black hair and beard flowing, Vuk Draskovic ascended to the fourth-floor balcony, raised his arms to the sky and pronounced his call for peaceful revolution to an adoring crowd below. "Democratic Serbia will protest!" he cried. "In the streets, the schools, the universities, the factories, the theaters. . . ."
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The once-fiery opposition leader Vuk Draskovic, in his first political rally in more than two years, called Saturday on Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and his political machine in Belgrade to resign and make way for a transition government of "independent Serbian experts" to rebuild this war-torn country.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
Slobodan Milosevic's Socialist Party claimed victory early today in Serbian elections, a vote many of his opponents boycotted because they said it was rigged. "It is obvious that our party has a substantial lead in both the presidential and parliamentary elections," party spokesman Ivica Dacic said. Preliminary results were expected this afternoon. Milosevic, who controls the state media, was expected from the beginning to see his party triumph in Sunday's vote.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long black hair and beard flowing, Vuk Draskovic ascended to the fourth-floor balcony, raised his arms to the sky and pronounced his call for peaceful revolution to an adoring crowd below. "Democratic Serbia will protest!" he cried. "In the streets, the schools, the universities, the factories, the theaters. . . ."
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