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Vukovar

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NEWS
November 28, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moaning farm animals, abandoned and starving, and camouflage-clad looters are the only signs of life amid square miles of rubble, all that remains of the city of Vukovar. Three months of shelling by Serbian guerrillas and punishing air strikes by the Yugoslav federal forces hacked every tree into splinters, perforated every vehicle, tore off every roof and killed an estimated 5,000 people, many of them civilians. Not a single home is habitable. No shop, no church, no public building survived.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 8, 2012 | By Eyal Press
Twenty years ago last week, Serbian snipers fired on a crowd of unarmed demonstrators in Sarajevo, launching a brutal siege that brought ethnic violence in the Balkans to menacing new heights. In the two decades since, attention has understandably focused on the deeds of the architects and perpetrators of the Balkan wars. Confronting the truth about how the violence was planned and orchestrated, many have argued, is an essential step in getting formerly warring factions to reckon honestly with their responsibility for what transpired.
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NEWS
November 11, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Serbian-led Yugoslav army and navy pounded Dubrovnik relentlessly Sunday in the heaviest assault so far on the historic Adriatic port. Battles raged elsewhere across the breakaway republic. At least 40 people were killed in weekend fighting, despite the announcement of European Community sanctions against Yugoslavia and an appeal by Serbia and its allies for the United Nations to send in peacekeeping troops.
NEWS
June 16, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who until recently was the mayor of this Serb-held city could not find his name on the voter registration list Sunday when he went to cast his ballot for president of Croatia. Nor could hundreds of other Serbs trying to vote in an election that appeared certain to return Croat nationalist leader Franjo Tudjman to the presidency.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of angry Serbs attacked delegates from Croatia's ruling party as they tried to campaign in Eastern Slavonia. U.N. official Douglas Coffman said the Croatian Democratic Union held a news conference in the town of Vukovar to present candidates who will run in the Serbian enclave during elections April 13. U.N. peacekeepers escorted the candidates to safety after protesters lobbed eggs and bricks at them. No one was seriously injured, Coffman said.
NEWS
June 16, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who until recently was the mayor of this Serb-held city could not find his name on the voter registration list Sunday when he went to cast his ballot for president of Croatia. Nor could hundreds of other Serbs trying to vote in an election that appeared certain to return Croat nationalist leader Franjo Tudjman to the presidency.
OPINION
April 8, 2012 | By Eyal Press
Twenty years ago last week, Serbian snipers fired on a crowd of unarmed demonstrators in Sarajevo, launching a brutal siege that brought ethnic violence in the Balkans to menacing new heights. In the two decades since, attention has understandably focused on the deeds of the architects and perpetrators of the Balkan wars. Confronting the truth about how the violence was planned and orchestrated, many have argued, is an essential step in getting formerly warring factions to reckon honestly with their responsibility for what transpired.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1996
On March 29 you published a review of the film "Vukovar" ("Vukovar Takes Grim Look at Love in War"). I agree that the noble intent of every war movie should be to show the madness and cruelty of such an enterprise avoiding (if at all possible) the specific political aspects of the conflict. However Vukovar's story is too well known for such an "impartial" interpretation. Vukovar together with Srebrenica was the sight of the most cruel atrocities committed by the Serbs on the Croats and Muslims.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of refugees fled shattered Vukovar on Tuesday as the Yugoslav federal army rooted out pockets of resistance in the city, cementing its most important military triumph in five months of war with Croatia. The town of 40,000 and its surroundings appeared to be almost totally under the control of the army and Serb insurgents. The army reportedly took control of Vukovar's bombed-out hospital, where an estimated 500 sick and wounded were trapped, as well as a suburban police station.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Relief workers evacuated hundreds of sick and wounded Wednesday from a bombed-out hospital in the Croatian city of Vukovar, where they were trapped for weeks by a Serbian siege. As they were taken from the shattered city, the wounded saw horrifying glimpses of the siege's carnage. There were claims of atrocities--including one report, which could not be independently confirmed, that many children were slain. Hundreds of bodies littered the streets.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of angry Serbs attacked delegates from Croatia's ruling party as they tried to campaign in Eastern Slavonia. U.N. official Douglas Coffman said the Croatian Democratic Union held a news conference in the town of Vukovar to present candidates who will run in the Serbian enclave during elections April 13. U.N. peacekeepers escorted the candidates to safety after protesters lobbed eggs and bricks at them. No one was seriously injured, Coffman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1996
On March 29 you published a review of the film "Vukovar" ("Vukovar Takes Grim Look at Love in War"). I agree that the noble intent of every war movie should be to show the madness and cruelty of such an enterprise avoiding (if at all possible) the specific political aspects of the conflict. However Vukovar's story is too well known for such an "impartial" interpretation. Vukovar together with Srebrenica was the sight of the most cruel atrocities committed by the Serbs on the Croats and Muslims.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Vukovar" takes its title from one of the former Yugoslavia's most beautiful cities, an ancient, picturesque Serb/Croat border town along the Danube. It opens just as the crumbling of the Berlin Wall is being seen on TV around the world, and in Vukovar a young couple, Anna (Mirjana Jokovic) and Toma (Boris Isakovic), take it as a good omen for their imminent marriage. They couldn't be more wrong.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zivko Popovich is a square-faced, gritty little man whose life capsized in the waves of ethnic hate that first began destroying the Yugoslav federation in the summer of 1991. By the time he found his bearings, Popovich and his family had landed in the ruins of this once-rich Danube River port town. Along with thousands of other refugees, they began again.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1995 | ROBERT EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was not the usual kind of world premiere. Serbian soldiers were posted across a line less than 100 yards away. Only one small movie house was available in this war-zone village. A studio projector had to be shipped in from Zagreb. For security reasons, high government officials demurred.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moaning farm animals, abandoned and starving, and camouflage-clad looters are the only signs of life amid square miles of rubble, all that remains of the city of Vukovar. Three months of shelling by Serbian guerrillas and punishing air strikes by the Yugoslav federal forces hacked every tree into splinters, perforated every vehicle, tore off every roof and killed an estimated 5,000 people, many of them civilians. Not a single home is habitable. No shop, no church, no public building survived.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | Times Wire Services
A European Community-led relief convoy turned back Monday from the outskirts of the besieged Croatian city of Vukovar after bickering between regional Croatian and federal army leaders blocked its entry. "The two sides didn't want any relief or food in Vukovar," said Michel Robert, head of the EC team bringing a 50-truck convoy with food and medicine. The team finally reached Vukovar on Sunday after battle delays and dangerous transit through no-man's-land.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Vukovar" takes its title from one of the former Yugoslavia's most beautiful cities, an ancient, picturesque Serb/Croat border town along the Danube. It opens just as the crumbling of the Berlin Wall is being seen on TV around the world, and in Vukovar a young couple, Anna (Mirjana Jokovic) and Toma (Boris Isakovic), take it as a good omen for their imminent marriage. They couldn't be more wrong.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | BLAINE HARDEN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Serb-dominated Yugoslav army, whose big guns have smashed this Danube River city, conducted a grisly press tour Thursday of what is left of Vukovar and blamed its destruction on "Croatian fascism." The grotesque parade--during which corpses of Serbs with cleaved-open skulls and gouged-out eyes were displayed for reporters before luncheon was served in a bombed-out hotel--was punctuated by a long oration from a senior army colonel.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Relief workers evacuated hundreds of sick and wounded Wednesday from a bombed-out hospital in the Croatian city of Vukovar, where they were trapped for weeks by a Serbian siege. As they were taken from the shattered city, the wounded saw horrifying glimpses of the siege's carnage. There were claims of atrocities--including one report, which could not be independently confirmed, that many children were slain. Hundreds of bodies littered the streets.
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