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Vulnerable

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OPINION
November 3, 2002
The L.A. County Board of Supervisors' decision to stop funding the Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center is a short-term solution that will do very little to resolve the anticipated budget shortfall ("County OKs Hospital Cuts," Oct. 30). Instead, it will leave thousands of paraplegic, quadriplegic and other ill and disabled patients without the resources essential to their rehabilitation. Sure, no one could have predicted a year ago that by 2006 the L.A. County Health Department would be approximately $700 million in the red. And I agree with the supervisors that difficult decisions must be made -- but not at the expense of the most vulnerable members of our society.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Adam Crain assumed that tapping into the computer networks used by power companies to keep electricity zipping through transmission lines would be nearly impossible in these days of heightened vigilance over cybersecurity. When he discovered how wrong he was, his work sent Homeland Security Department officials into a scramble. Crain, the owner of a small tech firm in Raleigh, N.C., along with a research partner, found penetrating transmission systems used by dozens of utilities to be startlingly easy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1992
Challenge Dan Quayle on issues of substance, such as his record on the environment, the economy and domestic policy. There, he might be vulnerable. Forget the rumors. JOHN BEDARFAS Rancho Palos Verdes
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | Sandy Banks
I've been feeling out of sorts lately - cranky, anxious, insecure - and not sure what to blame. My youngest daughter thinks Mercury might still be in retrograde. Her sister blames the recent swarm of earthquakes for my angst. And my eldest daughter suggests it's my advancing age; older people have more trouble adapting to daylight savings time, she says. They want me to figure it out soon so I can stop moping around. That's why last week's invitation for spiritual healing at a wolf preserve sounded like something I needed.
MAGAZINE
October 27, 1991
"The Death of Reading" omitted two points: Electronic media are far more vulnerable to government control than are books. In the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev's memoirs have been banned from broadcast, while smuggled copies can be read. Electronic media are also vulnerable to system failure. If viewing supplants reading, what happens when the system crashes? MARY MANSELL PAUL CARACCIOLO Pasadena
OPINION
July 18, 2005
In the Homeland Security bill just passed (July 15), mass transit took a back seat. Baggage checking is still limited. More enhanced airport security is delayed. Why? There is no question that there is a need and that we are not addressing security matters in the manner required, and doable. The justification in each case is budget limitations and priorities. I noted that the deficit was considerably less than anticipated (July 14), which may increase support for a tax cut desired by the Bush administration.
MAGAZINE
July 14, 1991
As a person who often advises people how to effectively and safely lose weight, I'm angered by articles such as Mark Stuart Gill's "Losing It in Fat City" (June 2). It upsets me that such quackery continues to exist, taking advantage of consumers who are vulnerable. I urge the consumer to beware. If it looks too good to be true, it probably is. JENNIFER GARRISON South Pasadena
OPINION
May 16, 1999
The May 4 article about the grossly underpaid professionals working for L.A. County took me back to the New York City internship my physician husband served, for which he was paid the munificent sum of $300 per year. Then, after completing his service as a physician for the U.S. Navy in the Pacific theater, he obtained a residency at the VA hospital in L.A. for $3,000 per year, 10 times as much as the internship, but still not enough for a family of three to live on, even then. Apparently exploitation of young, vulnerable professionals is nothing new!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1988
Are they going to take time out during an episode of Angels '88 to send the chic, sophisticated, 5-9, 120-pound Eurasian into an eating disorder hospital to deal with her bulimia? It's frightening to think that the role models Aaron Spelling intends to create perpetuate the myth that in order for a young woman to be perceived as "intelligent, independent . . . vulnerable, sensitive, and bright," she has to be grossly underweight. Young girls are throwing up and swallowing boxes of laxatives out of sheer desperation to be thin and my guess is so are some of the actresses Spelling's about to hire.
OPINION
October 6, 2006
Re "LAPD Arrests Skid Row Campers," Oct. 4 It's unfortunate that Los Angeles, and especially Police Chief William J. Bratton, haven't learned some of the hard lessons New York City learned about street homelessness during Mayor Rudy Giuliani's administration -- instead focusing on expedient, short-term measures that simply sweep the problem from public view. Certainly no one wants to see vulnerable homeless people exposed to the unrelenting dangers of the street. But policies that focus on arresting homeless people offer no lasting solution.
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SAN DIEGO - For seven innings, it was a game that glittered with the Dodgers' brightest hopes. Then, in what felt like seven minutes, it was a game that swallowed them up in their worst fears. What began as a nice first chapter highlighted by great pitching and smart hitting devolved into a woeful opening verse of lousy relief, shoddy fielding, managerial second-guessing and a giant poke in the belly of the $250-million beast. What began as a pleasant night at Petco Park suddenly became a raging storm that thundered with chants of "Beat L.A. " It was a sweet opener, until the Dodgers forgot to close it, losing a one-run lead in the eighth inning in a 3-1 loss to the San Diego Padres on Sunday in baseball's first 2014 game on U.S. soil.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Unusual rib bones that grow out of the neck are giving scientists new clues about what caused the woolly mammoth to become extinct roughly 10,000 years ago. The so-called cervical ribs - extra rib bones that protrude from the vertebrae at the base of the neck - were about 10 times more common in mammoths living in the Late Pleistocene than they are in elephants alive today, according to a study by Dutch researchers published Tuesday in the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Rosanna Xia and Rong-Gong Lin II
California officials on Friday announced that they were beginning to draw tsunami flood maps in Huntington Beach, Crescent City and other communities that cities could use to regulate development in areas along the coast at risk during a large tsunami. The California Geological Survey made the announcement Friday in advance of the 50th anniversary of the deadliest tsunami that has hit modern California. Fifty years ago next Thursday, a tsunami triggered by a 9.2 earthquake in Alaska killed 13 people in California alone.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By Steve Appleford
AUSTIN, Texas - Edward Snowden brought no bombshells when he arrived to an excited round of applause Monday, his stubbled face relaxed as it was beamed in from across the continents for a "virtual conversation" about the vulnerability of personal data. His presence was event enough. Public appearances by the former National Security Agency contractor and U.S. exile are rare, and this one was beamed in from an undisclosed location in Russia via several online proxies for his own security, a bit of technological cloak-and-dagger that could only add to his mystique for the three roomfuls of international tech specialists struggling to hear his words in video that was choppy and often inaudible.
SCIENCE
February 27, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
A child born to a father 45 or older is three and a half times more likely to be diagnosed with autism, more than 13 times more likely to have attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and almost 25 times more likely to suffer from bipolar disorder than a child born to a man in his early twenties, says a study out this week. Suicide attempts and substance use problems were also found to be more than twice as common in children born to older fathers than those with younger dads, and rates of academic failure -- staying back a grade -- and low educational attainment were higher in those with older fathers than in those with younger ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Luis Rios, who lost his job at a filling station in December at the age of 56, is newly eligible for Medicaid, the healthcare program for the poor. Following the advice of state-trained medical insurance enrollment workers, he filled out the paperwork required to get coverage - but has a nagging fear that he may have put his family's financial assets at risk. That's because, in certain cases, Medi-Cal, California's version of Medicaid, will be able to collect repayment for healthcare services from the estate after a recipient dies, including placing government liens on property.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1987
I find it interesting that Steve Tisch says that he'd feel irresponsible making "Risky Business" today because it was aimed at teen-agers and "introduced them to the world of call girls and casual sex" ("Is Hollywood Getting the Message About Safe Sex?" by John M. Wilson, July 19). It was OK in 1983 but not today because of AIDS, right? He and other film makers are suddenly exhibiting a conscience about the negative role models they've been giving this vulnerable age group for years now. Parents who are trying to raise their children with strong values and high morals don't want to be thankful for a killer virus--but it's real tempting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988
"The Good Mother" isn't about an evil woman who is punished for her misdeeds. It's about an average, or perhaps slightly better than average, woman who suddenly finds herself victimized in a very painful and very real way. Why must Anna suffer? Why is there no voice of reason in the courtroom? Because the film makers are condemning female sexuality? Nonsense! The point is that life is not always fair and society not always as just and understanding as it should be. "The Good Mother" shows us how vulnerable we all are to being judged without compassion, and Avins' nasty attack on the film demonstrates that it is a lesson we need to learn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they will determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
SPORTS
February 4, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - As his plane approached Sochi-Adler International Airport, flying low over the coast, Erik Guay glanced out the window. Warships sat anchored on the Black Sea below. "That's the first sight you get," the Canadian skier said. "In a way, it makes you feel safe. " Security has been a major concern leading up to the 2014 Sochi Olympics. These Games are considered particularly vulnerable to terrorist attacks because of their proximity to the North Caucasus, a region where Islamic militants have waged a violent insurgency.
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