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NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By James Rainey
Americans might have been surprised by their reintroduction to Mitt Romney and President Obama in Wednesday night's first debate. For months they had been hearing about Romney, the heartless capitalist, and Obama, the unapologetic socialist. The two men who discussed the future of the country for an hour and a half in prime-time television looked nothing like those caricatures that have been presented by ideologues. Both men came across as reasonable, competent and, yes, presidential.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By James Rainey
Americans might have been surprised by their reintroduction to Mitt Romney and President Obama in Wednesday night's first debate. For months they had been hearing about Romney, the heartless capitalist, and Obama, the unapologetic socialist. The two men who discussed the future of the country for an hour and a half in prime-time television looked nothing like those caricatures that have been presented by ideologues. Both men came across as reasonable, competent and, yes, presidential.
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NATIONAL
March 16, 2012 | By David Horsey
The good news is that $2.15 billion of Goldman Sachs' market value was wiped out by a disillusioned executive's very public parting shot at the investment bank's greed and selfish cynicism. The bad news is it will probably be a temporary loss and will do little to change the ethical climate at Goldman Sachs or in the larger world of Wall Street. Pirates are a hard bunch to reform. Greg Smith is the 33-year-old, London-based head of Goldman Sachs' overseas equity derivatives business who quit his job just minutes before his explosive Op-Ed article appeared in Wednesday's New York Times.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
Remember Rick Perry? He's the guy who tangled bitterly with Mitt Romney in the Republican primary, attacking him for practicing "vulture capitalism" at Bain Capital and being attacked, in turn, for what Romney characterized as "liberal" immigration policies in Texas. Perry, the Texas governor, resurfaced Tuesday as a voice in the presidential campaign when he appeared to join the chorus of (mostly Democratic) voices urging Romney to release more of his tax returns. "No matter who you are or what office you are running for, you should be as transparent as you can be with your tax returns and other aspects of your life so that people have the appropriate ability to judge your background," Perry said to CBS News Austin affiliate KEYE-TV.
OPINION
April 10, 2013
Re "The tougher workplace," two-part series, April 7 and 8 I am an attorney representing injured workers, and daily I see the physical, mental and emotional toll on employees who are pushed to the limits for the sake of efficiency. Squeezing more work out of fewer employees may save labor costs up front, but in the long run it is a recipe for increased on-the-job accidents or injuries and higher insurance premiums. Ultimately, these costs are passed along to the consumer. It is time to bring back a humane approach to running a business.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | ALICE KAHN
I have seen the best minds of my generation--hysterical, naked, making big bucks after taxes and death. A recent Forbes magazine ranking of the wealthiest celebrities also notes several who have made millions after they died. It gives new meaning to the term "vulture capitalism." Elvis is worth more dead than alive. James Dean is finally a millionaire. If Rob Lowe had any brains, he'd shoot himself. News that T. S.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By John Hoeffel
The day after he finished last in New Hampshire's Republican presidential primary, Texas Gov. Rick Perry launched a packed day of events in South Carolina, where he has staked the future of his campaign. Speaking to about 55 people in a side room at the Lizard's Thicket restaurant in Lexington, just west of the state capital, Columbia, an animated Perry dismissed Iowa as “interesting” and New Hampshire as “a fine place,” but said: “South Carolina is who picks presidents.” Since 1980, every winner of the GOP primary in South Carolina has gone on to take the party's presidential nomination.
OPINION
January 24, 2012 | By Jonathan Tasini
Politicians bickering over private equity's impact on jobs and how to bring down the high unemployment rate are entirely missing the point about the crisis facing working Americans. The predicament we face isn't simply that there are too few jobs; it's also that an increasing number of workers don't have the kind of job that can pay the bills. While productivity has grown by more than 80% over the last 30 years, wages have effectively been flat for 80% of Americans. So, although we're making stuff faster and more efficiently, the benefits of that hard work have not trickled into the pockets of the people who do it. Let's turn first to the intensifying debate over Mitt Romney's role as a private equity manager.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By David Ulin, Times Book Critic
It's hardly shocking that the most fully realized characters in "The Casual Vacancy," J.K. Rowling's first novel for adults, are the youngest. Fats Wall, Krystal Weedon, Gaia Bawden, Andrew Price, Sukhvinder Jawanda: Even the names are vaguely reminiscent of those in her “Harry Potter” series, and when “The Casual Vacancy” focuses on these teenagers and their interactions (with one another, with their parents, with the petty hypocrisies of...
NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Newt Gingrich surged to victory Saturday in the South Carolina primary, riding a pair of strong debate performances to overtake Mitt Romney and stop his seemingly relentless march to the GOP nomination. Television networks called the race for the former House speaker almost immediately after the polls closed, a repeat of what happened 11 days ago in New Hampshire, but with a much different result. Former Massachusetts Gov. Romney appeared headed for second place, with former Sen. Rick Santorum  of Pennsylvania and Rep. Ron Paul of Texas trailing well behind.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, John Hoeffel and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
A day after Mitt Romney's lopsided New Hampshire victory, the Republican presidential race shifted to South Carolina, where his rivals face possibly their last shot at stopping him from sealing the nomination. Romney's opponents are betting that a strongly conservative state with a large evangelical population will reject a former Massachusetts governor with a mixed record on social issues. But Romney is leading in polls here, and South Carolina appears ripe for Romney's economic message.
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