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Vyacheslav A Nikonov

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NEWS
July 27, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 1962 and Vyacheslav A. Nikonov is 6 years old. He is hospitalized with a childhood illness, separated from his parents, surrounded by strangers and frightfully worried. About the Cuban missile crisis. "It was the first thing I asked my father about when he came to pick me up," the political strategist, now 40, recalls of his early interest in world affairs. "I had been listening to the radio the whole time I was in the hospital.
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NEWS
July 27, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 1962 and Vyacheslav A. Nikonov is 6 years old. He is hospitalized with a childhood illness, separated from his parents, surrounded by strangers and frightfully worried. About the Cuban missile crisis. "It was the first thing I asked my father about when he came to pick me up," the political strategist, now 40, recalls of his early interest in world affairs. "I had been listening to the radio the whole time I was in the hospital.
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NEWS
September 3, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governor appointed by President Boris N. Yeltsin in the "red belt" region of Saratov crushed his Communist challenger in the first of 52 autumn elections for control of Russia's provincial heartland, complete returns showed Monday. The lopsided outcome of Sunday's closely watched election spelled trouble for the Communists' goal of rebounding from defeat in the July presidential vote by gaining power at the grass roots.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a month of diplomatic pressure on Iraq, Russia indicated Tuesday that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein is ready to accept a United Nations demand that Baghdad give formal and legal recognition to Kuwait. Word of the possible breakthrough came after a two-hour meeting here, arranged at Iraq's request, between Tarik Aziz, the Iraqi deputy prime minister, and Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev. If confirmed by Baghdad, the step could lead to a lifting of U.N.
NEWS
June 15, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a bumpy five months to arrange, with U.S.-Russian relations going through more than a few ups and downs along the way, but President Vladimir V. Putin is finally getting his wish for a face-to-face meeting with President Bush. In advance of the meeting Saturday in Slovenia, Russian officials have been laying out modest expectations, portraying the summit as a chance for the two presidents to take measure of each other, hear each other out and try to establish some rapport.
WORLD
November 15, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
In the elegant hall of chandeliers and columns where Josef Stalin's body once lay in state, President Vladimir V. Putin on Friday met with many of Russia's most powerful businessmen, attempting to calm fears that the federal investigation of oil giant Yukos will mean a return to the era of a state-managed economy.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of foreign church groups here said Saturday that they will fight legislation aimed at restricting religious freedom in Russia and will continue their missionary work until they are forced to leave the country. As the Kremlin threw its weight behind the measure, missionary leaders said they hope Russia will stop short of adopting the proposal, which would prohibit church groups from disseminating their ideas if they have operated in Russia for less than 15 years.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pollsters are mobilized. Television air time is at a premium. Spin doctors are bending ears, and campaign war chests are bulging. If the electoral battle reaching a crescendo in faraway Krasnoyarsk sounds like the New Hampshire primary, that might be because it has become the dress rehearsal for Russia's next presidential election in 2000.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An increasingly feeble President Boris N. Yeltsin took a serious political body blow Wednesday when the Federation Council, Russia's upper house of parliament, defied his attempts to get rid of the country's prosecutor general. In a murky political intrigue, a grubby video reportedly exposing the prosecutor, Yuri Skuratov, in a sex romp was mysteriously circulated to the media and Federation Council members on the eve of the council's Wednesday session to decide his future.
WORLD
March 4, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
For much of the world, he is the voice of Russian democracy, the man who, in one of the world's most repressive nations, opened a door called perestroika to a pluralistic future and helped end the Cold War. But with increasing frequency, former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is being called on to defend Russia against fears that the world's largest nation is slipping back toward its authoritarian past.
WORLD
January 10, 2007 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A Russian-Belarusian oil dispute that has shut down a key pipeline carrying crude oil to European customers may drag on long enough to force Moscow to cut production, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said Tuesday. The bitter spat between the longtime allies led to a cutoff Monday in the flow of oil across Belarus, prompting complaints from European officials.
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