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Vyacheslav Chornovil

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OPINION
June 30, 1991 | Christine Demkowych, Christine Demkowych, a graduate of Columbia University's Harriman Institute for Advanced Study of the Soviet Union, will be living in Kiev for the next year. She interviewed Vyacheslav M. Chornovil during the deputy's recent visit to Los Angeles
A man who spent 15 years in Soviet prisons for protesting human-rights violations might be expected to be full of bitterness and resentment. But Vyacheslav M. Chornovil, former-prisoner-of-conscience-turned-deputy to the Supreme Soviet of Ukraine, speaks with an intelligence and optimism that is admirable in light of his turbulent past. As governor of the Lvov Oblast in the western half of the republic, Chornovil, 54, is at the helm of the democratic independence movement in Ukraine.
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NEWS
March 2, 1992 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rukh, the mass movement that spearheaded Ukraine's drive for independence, emerged shaken but still intact Sunday from a three-day congress that narrowly averted splitting it in two over its future role in the new Ukraine. A bitter debate among nearly 1,000 delegates grew so heated that at one point, Rukh's two-term chairman, poet Ivan Drach, walked out of the meeting.
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NEWS
March 2, 1992 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rukh, the mass movement that spearheaded Ukraine's drive for independence, emerged shaken but still intact Sunday from a three-day congress that narrowly averted splitting it in two over its future role in the new Ukraine. A bitter debate among nearly 1,000 delegates grew so heated that at one point, Rukh's two-term chairman, poet Ivan Drach, walked out of the meeting.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only noon, but this was the third campaign stop of the day, and Vyacheslav Chornovil's voice, damaged by 15 years in labor camps and Siberian exile, had been reduced to a croaking whisper. Wearing a blue suit, he stood amid the drill pressers at the Fiolent Radio Parts Factory, addressing 80 or so workers clad in greasy overalls. His broad forehead, accentuated by a receding hairline, glistened with sweat.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only noon, but this was the third campaign stop of the day, and Vyacheslav Chornovil's voice, damaged by 15 years in labor camps and Siberian exile, had been reduced to a croaking whisper. Wearing a blue suit, he stood amid the drill pressers at the Fiolent Radio Parts Factory, addressing 80 or so workers clad in greasy overalls. His broad forehead, accentuated by a receding hairline, glistened with sweat.
WORLD
September 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Ukraine's most prominent nationalist leader, jailed for more than a decade in Soviet times and killed in a 1999 car accident, was in fact slain, the country's interior minister said. Yuri Lutsenko said at a news conference in the city of Dnipropetrovsk that new evidence showed Vyacheslav Chornovil's death resulted from foul play. No charges had yet been filed.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | From Reuters
Deputies said Tuesday that Ukraine will put off for several months a vote on ratifying two key disarmament treaties, placing the former Soviet republic at odds with the United States on strategic issues. Dmytro Pavlychko, chairman of Parliament's foreign affairs commission, said Parliament will begin full-scale hearings today on START I, the first strategic arms reduction treaty, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. But a vote on the documents will probably not occur until fall, he said.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a marathon 23-hour session, the Ukrainian parliament adopted the country's first post-Soviet constitution Friday, ending four years of resistance by Communists and averting a showdown with President Leonid D. Kuchma. "Wisdom has triumphed," Kuchma proclaimed after the 315-36 vote to approve the long-awaited national charter.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | ALEX SHPRINTSEN and MICHAEL PARKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A coalition of Ukrainian nationalist and pro-democracy forces emerged here Tuesday to challenge President Leonid Kravchuk's government, ending his six-month political honeymoon with the country's opposition groups. Meeting after a boisterous rally of more than 3,000 miners, teachers and physicians in front of the Ukrainian Parliament, opposition leaders agreed on a petition drive for a referendum on dissolving the legislature, elected in 1990 in the waning years of Soviet rule.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Spurred by appeals to avoid a constitutional conflict like the one convulsing Russia, Ukraine's Parliament voted Friday to hold early parliamentary and presidential elections next year. Ukrainian officials said they hoped that the balloting will lead to ratification of treaties, long held up by parliamentary opposition, that oblige Ukraine to give up the nuclear missiles it inherited from the former Soviet Union.
OPINION
June 30, 1991 | Christine Demkowych, Christine Demkowych, a graduate of Columbia University's Harriman Institute for Advanced Study of the Soviet Union, will be living in Kiev for the next year. She interviewed Vyacheslav M. Chornovil during the deputy's recent visit to Los Angeles
A man who spent 15 years in Soviet prisons for protesting human-rights violations might be expected to be full of bitterness and resentment. But Vyacheslav M. Chornovil, former-prisoner-of-conscience-turned-deputy to the Supreme Soviet of Ukraine, speaks with an intelligence and optimism that is admirable in light of his turbulent past. As governor of the Lvov Oblast in the western half of the republic, Chornovil, 54, is at the helm of the democratic independence movement in Ukraine.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | From Reuters
Radical reformers including Boris N. Yeltsin and several former political prisoners defeated orthodox Communist opponents in many regions, incomplete results from elections in three Soviet republics showed today. But ballots with as many as 20 candidates in a race frustrated the election process. Returns from more than half of the 1,068 parliamentary districts in the huge Russian Federation were inconclusive, the official news agency Tass said.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Both reformers and Communists claimed victory Monday in Ukraine's parliamentary elections as unofficial returns from weekend runoffs trickled into the capital. But with 330 of the legislature's 450 seats filled by two weeks of voting, neither the right nor the left had won a clear majority.
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