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HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My doctor prescribed Vytorin for high cholesterol. While my cholesterol went from over 350 to 190 in five weeks, I ended up having an eight-hour episode of transient global amnesia (TGA). I knew who I was, and I recognized my family and friends, but I didn't know the year. I didn't recognize streets I have driven for many years. I asked my husband the same five questions in the hospital over and over until late in the evening, when my memory returned. I immediately went off Vytorin.
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NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
All statins, a popular type of cholesterol-lowering drug, carry a low risk of muscle injury. But patients on the highest dose of the drug simvastatin, most commonly known as Zocor, seem to be at an elevated risk—so doctors should stop prescribing that dose for most people, the Food and Drug Administration has advised. That dose, 80 milligrams, should continue to be taken only by patients who have taken it for at least 12 months without muscle injury, the agency said Wednesday in a safety announcement . Everyone else should heed the FDA’s updated labels on simvastatin, and simvastatin-containing drugs such as Vytorin and Simcor.
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BUSINESS
September 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Results so far from three studies of the cholesterol-lowering drug Vytorin are not enough to prove or rule out a possible link to a higher risk of cancer, so the drug should be used with caution until more is known, editors of a leading medical journal urged Tuesday. The New England Journal of Medicine published online results from one study and an analysis of partial results from two others. They also were presented at a cardiology conference in Munich. Vytorin is a combination of Merck's Zocor, a long-sold statin drug, and Schering-Plough's Zetia, a newer type of medicine that lowers cholesterol in a different way. The possible cancer risk unexpectedly arose in July, when Dr. Terje Pedersen of Oslo announced preliminary results from a study testing whether Vytorin could prevent damage to the heart's aortic valve from worsening.
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My doctor prescribed Vytorin for high cholesterol. While my cholesterol went from over 350 to 190 in five weeks, I ended up having an eight-hour episode of transient global amnesia (TGA). I knew who I was, and I recognized my family and friends, but I didn't know the year. I didn't recognize streets I have driven for many years. I asked my husband the same five questions in the hospital over and over until late in the evening, when my memory returned. I immediately went off Vytorin.
HEALTH
April 7, 2008 | By Karen Ravn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The cholesterol drug did absolutely everything it was supposed to do -- except for demonstrably improving the health of the people who took it. That was the conclusion reached about the popular drug Vytorin in a study published online last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The results were a disappointment to the millions of patients who take Vytorin and the thousands of doctors who prescribe it; a blow to its manufacturers, Merck & Co. and Schering-Plough Corp.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Merck & Co. and Schering-Plough Corp. said they would pay $41.5 million to settle lawsuits alleging they delayed unfavorable study results because the results would hurt sales. In January 2008 the drug makers, partners on two blockbuster cholesterol drugs, released long-awaited study data showing that Vytorin and Zetia were no more effective than an older, less-expensive cholesterol treatment aimed at reducing plaque buildup in arteries of people whose genes gave them sky-high cholesterol.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | Joe Graedon And Teresa Graedon
Q: Recently I heard a suggestion that niacin would be better and cheaper than Vytorin for lowering cholesterol. A: In a November study in the New England Journal of Medicine, niacin was compared with ezetimibe (Zetia), one part of the combination medicine Vytorin. All 200 patients took a statin cholesterol-lowering drug, but some took prescription niacin and others Zetia in addition to the statin. Niacin worked better than Zetia for cardiovascular health. We believe niacin should be used only under medical supervision.
HEALTH
December 26, 2005 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My husband takes HCTZ and Monopril for his hypertension, and Vytorin to lower his cholesterol. Since starting the drugs, he's had trouble with impotence. He refuses to see a urologist but takes an herb called horny goat weed instead. What effect could this herb have on his other medications? Clinical data to support the effectiveness of horny goat weed ( Epimedium) for erectile dysfunction or low libido are limited. What's more, products being sold as horny goat weed vary tremendously.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
All statins, a popular type of cholesterol-lowering drug, carry a low risk of muscle injury. But patients on the highest dose of the drug simvastatin, most commonly known as Zocor, seem to be at an elevated risk—so doctors should stop prescribing that dose for most people, the Food and Drug Administration has advised. That dose, 80 milligrams, should continue to be taken only by patients who have taken it for at least 12 months without muscle injury, the agency said Wednesday in a safety announcement . Everyone else should heed the FDA’s updated labels on simvastatin, and simvastatin-containing drugs such as Vytorin and Simcor.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2008 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Years of high-profile court battles over drugs such as Vioxx and Celebrex, along with billion-dollar settlements and jury verdicts, could soon be a thing of the past. The U.S. Supreme Court, in an 8-1 decision, ruled last month that patients injured by most medical devices can't sue their manufacturers. And this fall, a similar case could extend the same legal protection to the much larger pharmaceutical industry -- a frequent target of lawsuits. In last month's case, the high court backed a legal theory, supported by the Bush administration, that maintains that the Food and Drug Administration adequately regulates the drug and device industries and should not be second-guessed by courts.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | Joe Graedon And Teresa Graedon
Q: Recently I heard a suggestion that niacin would be better and cheaper than Vytorin for lowering cholesterol. A: In a November study in the New England Journal of Medicine, niacin was compared with ezetimibe (Zetia), one part of the combination medicine Vytorin. All 200 patients took a statin cholesterol-lowering drug, but some took prescription niacin and others Zetia in addition to the statin. Niacin worked better than Zetia for cardiovascular health. We believe niacin should be used only under medical supervision.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Merck & Co. and Schering-Plough Corp. said they would pay $41.5 million to settle lawsuits alleging they delayed unfavorable study results because the results would hurt sales. In January 2008 the drug makers, partners on two blockbuster cholesterol drugs, released long-awaited study data showing that Vytorin and Zetia were no more effective than an older, less-expensive cholesterol treatment aimed at reducing plaque buildup in arteries of people whose genes gave them sky-high cholesterol.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2009 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that patients should not stop taking Vytorin or other cholesterol-lowering drugs, based on its just-completed review of a controversial study that hammered Vytorin sales. A statement issued by the regulatory agency said it was sticking to its original position that medicines that reduce bad cholesterol benefit patients at risk of heart attack, stroke or sudden death.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Results so far from three studies of the cholesterol-lowering drug Vytorin are not enough to prove or rule out a possible link to a higher risk of cancer, so the drug should be used with caution until more is known, editors of a leading medical journal urged Tuesday. The New England Journal of Medicine published online results from one study and an analysis of partial results from two others. They also were presented at a cardiology conference in Munich. Vytorin is a combination of Merck's Zocor, a long-sold statin drug, and Schering-Plough's Zetia, a newer type of medicine that lowers cholesterol in a different way. The possible cancer risk unexpectedly arose in July, when Dr. Terje Pedersen of Oslo announced preliminary results from a study testing whether Vytorin could prevent damage to the heart's aortic valve from worsening.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
In the latest disappointment for cholesterol pill Vytorin, a major European study in patients with heart valve disease found the drug didn't prevent worsening of the disease or lower the need for valve surgery, sending its makers' stock plunging. Results of a preliminary analysis of the just-completed study showed Vytorin, marketed jointly by Merck & Co. and Schering-Plough Corp.
HEALTH
April 7, 2008 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
The cholesterol drug did absolutely everything it was supposed to do -- except for demonstrably improving the health of the people who took it. That was the conclusion reached about the popular drug Vytorin in a study published online last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The results were a disappointment to the millions of patients who take Vytorin and the thousands of doctors who prescribe it; a blow to its manufacturers, Merck & Co. and Schering-Plough Corp.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2009 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that patients should not stop taking Vytorin or other cholesterol-lowering drugs, based on its just-completed review of a controversial study that hammered Vytorin sales. A statement issued by the regulatory agency said it was sticking to its original position that medicines that reduce bad cholesterol benefit patients at risk of heart attack, stroke or sudden death.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The heavily advertised drug Vytorin is no better than an inexpensive generic drug at blocking the damaging effects of high cholesterol levels, according to new data released by the drug's manufacturers Monday. In a study of 720 patients funded by the manufacturers, Vytorin -- a combination of the drugs simvastatin and ezetemibe -- reduced levels of LDLs, the so-called bad cholesterol, by about 29% more than simvastatin alone.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2008 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Two of the world's bestselling drugs to lower cholesterol may have no benefit, researchers reported Sunday in a development that could significantly alter how patients are treated for heart disease. Based on the news, a top medical journal encouraged doctors to stop routinely prescribing them. Vytorin and a related drug, Zetia, did not reduce fatty plaque in arteries any more than a cheaper generic, researchers said at a major cardiology conference in Chicago.
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