Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsW Eugene Smith
IN THE NEWS

W Eugene Smith

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
It may be that obsession is the price of a place in history. W. Eugene Smith may have been more obsessed with the purity, the possibilities and the power of the photograph than anyone in modern times. And the images from his photo essays--of men at war, of the life of a country doctor in Colorado and of Dr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
It may be that obsession is the price of a place in history. W. Eugene Smith may have been more obsessed with the purity, the possibilities and the power of the photograph than anyone in modern times. And the images from his photo essays--of men at war, of the life of a country doctor in Colorado and of Dr.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Not quite a household word in photography but a master of his trade, the late W. Eugene Smith offered a brutal insight into man's highest and lowest moments. His technique could be as flashy and obvious as a calling card ("Empire State Building at Midnight") or tempered to a grainy, blink-of-a-second in time ("Three Men Hugging, Andrea Doria"). Remarkably, these photos--mostly from the '50s--ferret out weighty content in the most everyday places.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Not quite a household word in photography but a master of his trade, the late W. Eugene Smith offered a brutal insight into man's highest and lowest moments. His technique could be as flashy and obvious as a calling card ("Empire State Building at Midnight") or tempered to a grainy, blink-of-a-second in time ("Three Men Hugging, Andrea Doria"). Remarkably, these photos--mostly from the '50s--ferret out weighty content in the most everyday places.
MAGAZINE
June 29, 1986 | BEN MADDOW, From the book "Let Truth Be the Prejudice," text by Ben Maddow, photographs by W. Eugene Smith, copyright 1985. Reprinted by permission of Aperture and John G. Morris, as agent for the heirs of W. Eugene Smith. Publication and exhibition supported by grants from the Atlantic Richfield Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Pew Memorial Trust.
Everyone's life is finally inexplicable; William Eugene Smith's was rather less so. His vocation, he once said, was to do nothing less than record, by word and photograph, the human condition. No one could really succeed at such a job; yet Smith almost did. During his relatively brief and often painful life (he died in 1978 at age 59), he created images so powerful that they have altered the perception of history. (More than 250 are on display at the Temporary Contemporary through August 10.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2011
ART Collectors' Favorites, a special exhibition of photographs on loan from private collections of members of LACMA's Photographic Arts Council, features 60 artworks from the 1880s to the present day. The show features masters of photography such as Karl Struss, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Ruth Bernard, Bruce Davidson, James Van Der Zee, W. Eugene Smith, and Heinrich Kühn. Stephen Cohen Gallery, 7358 Beverly Blvd., Park La Brea. Exhibit opening reception, 7-9 p.m. Thu. Runs Tue.-Sat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001
Rosalie Gwathmey, 92, a photographer known for pictures of Southern black communities in the 1940s. Much of Gwathmey's work focused on Charlotte, N.C., her hometown. Her photographs revealed a gritty vision of black life there in the 1940s. Her work appeared at the Museum of Modern Art in 1946. Gwathmey was involved with the Photo League in Manhattan, whose members included Paul Strand, W. Eugene Smith and Dorothea Lange.
MAGAZINE
February 18, 1990 | MARGERY L. SCHWARTZ
'As with every art, in photography the most important thing is that we feel fully what we are doing," said Hungarian-born photographer Andre Kertesz, describing the works he and his counterparts started producing just after World War I. These experiments--the photographer interjecting his own feelings into the familiar--would continue indefinitely under the rubric subjectivity.
NEWS
February 9, 1986
Photographs from the archives of Life magazine that chronicle the events following World War II in the years 1946 to 1955 will continue on display through March 16 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. "Life: The Second Decade 1946-1955" is an exhibition of 200 black-and-white prints, most of which were taken on assignment for the magazine by some of the world's most distinguished photojournalists.
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ben Maddow, novelist, biographer, poet and screenwriter whose work included the classic John Huston film "The Asphalt Jungle," has died. He was 83. Maddow died Friday in a Hollywood convalescent hospital of congestive heart failure, his longtime friend Alan Marcus said over the weekend. Marcus recently published a collection of Maddow's poems titled "A False Biography."
MAGAZINE
June 29, 1986 | BEN MADDOW, From the book "Let Truth Be the Prejudice," text by Ben Maddow, photographs by W. Eugene Smith, copyright 1985. Reprinted by permission of Aperture and John G. Morris, as agent for the heirs of W. Eugene Smith. Publication and exhibition supported by grants from the Atlantic Richfield Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Pew Memorial Trust.
Everyone's life is finally inexplicable; William Eugene Smith's was rather less so. His vocation, he once said, was to do nothing less than record, by word and photograph, the human condition. No one could really succeed at such a job; yet Smith almost did. During his relatively brief and often painful life (he died in 1978 at age 59), he created images so powerful that they have altered the perception of history. (More than 250 are on display at the Temporary Contemporary through August 10.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2011
STAGE Sandra Bernhard On her new live comedy album, "I Love Being Me, Don't You?," Sandra Bernhard careens from acidic commentary about Angelina Jolie's lips to her daughter's recent bat mitzvah gift wish — a Japanese toilet — to how kabbalah "went all wrong. " Now, Bernhard will perform some of that material live — along with plenty of new comedy and music — in her latest staged show of the same name. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Sat.; 7 p.m. Sun.; 8:30 p.m. Aug. 17-20; 7 p.m. Aug. 21. (213)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|