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W J Jerry Sanders

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BUSINESS
May 4, 1987 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
It was April 7, and W. J. "Jerry" Sanders and Irwin Federman, two of Silicon Valley's most easily recognized executives, were doing a deal at the Chantilly, a Palo Alto restaurant where the hushed buzz of serious high-tech conversation is mellowed by $250 bottles of ruby red wine and blush pink decor. When dinner was over and their deal nearly done, Sanders paid the bill. "When I'm with Jerry, he picks up the tab," Federman recounted.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 1987 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
It was April 7, and W. J. "Jerry" Sanders and Irwin Federman, two of Silicon Valley's most easily recognized executives, were doing a deal at the Chantilly, a Palo Alto restaurant where the hushed buzz of serious high-tech conversation is mellowed by $250 bottles of ruby red wine and blush pink decor. When dinner was over and their deal nearly done, Sanders paid the bill. "When I'm with Jerry, he picks up the tab," Federman recounted.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advanced Micro Devices said Tuesday that it had taken orders for its clone of Intel's widely used 386 microprocessor and would begin shipping the long-awaited part this quarter. The Sunnyvale-based semiconductor company's efforts to make and market a 386, the brain inside the most popular International Business Machines-compatible personal computers, has resulted in a protracted legal battle with Intel.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
One of the most enduring bits of Silicon Valley lore is coming to an end next month, the latest victim of the slumping semiconductor industry. Advanced Micro Devices is ending its 17-year policy of no layoffs. AMD said it was firing 200 workers not covered by the policy and would determine by mid-October whether there would be layoffs of its nearly 13,000 employees. Analysts, however, said more work force reductions are almost certain to come at the Sunnyvale-based computer-chip maker.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening the way for Advanced Micro Devices to challenge Intel Corp. in the red-hot market for 486 personal computer chips, a U.S. District Court judge on Friday set aside a jury finding that AMD had violated Intel copyrights and ordered a new trial. The ruling makes it possible for AMD to begin immediate production of a clone of Intel's 486 computer chip, rather then spending months completing a 486 clone that doesn't use Intel's copyrighted microcode software.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2002 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON -- Microsoft Corp.'s first witness in its antitrust battle against nine states said in court Tuesday that Chairman Bill Gates convinced him to testify after suggesting Microsoft would return the favor with a key product endorsement. W.J. "Jerry" Sanders III, chief executive of computer chip maker Advanced Micro Devices Inc.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fortifying itself to do battle with semiconductor giant Intel Corp., Advanced Micro Devices Inc. said it will purchase NexGen Inc., a Milpitas, Calif., designer of microprocessors, the chips that act as the brain of a personal computer. NexGen shareholders will receive 0.8 share of AMD stock for every share they own, giving the smaller company a price tag of about $857 million. AMD's stock closed at $26.13, down 75 cents on Friday while NexGen ended the day at $21.25, down by 37.5 cents.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1988 | Associated Press
Texas' capital city has the potential to be a world leader in microelectronics now that it has become home to a second national consortium doing research in the field, industry and university officials say. The groups' combined efforts--supported by University of Texas facilities and researchers--should help the United States compete better with Japan in microchip manufacturing.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES and JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Gargantuan legal battle between chip makers Intel Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. cost more than $100 million dollars, consumed thousands of hours of executives' time, burned out at least one general counsel and wrecked a collegial Silicon Valley friendship--and it ended Wednesday with a modest net payment of $40 million. Was it worth it? Hardly. Will such fiascoes be repeated in the litigious high-tech industry? Almost certainly.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ink was barely dry last week on a new agreement to give American semiconductor producers greater access to Japanese markets when it became apparent that the two sides had very different views of what they had just agreed upon. "We have an agreement that says we should have a 20% market share by the end of 1992," W. J. (Jerry) Sanders III, chief executive of Sunnyvale-based Advanced Micro Devices Inc.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Corp., whose buying spree here has included purchases of CBS Records and Columbia Pictures, is making its biggest move yet into U.S. computer markets by purchasing its first American semiconductor plant, it was disclosed Tuesday.
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