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BUSINESS
July 22, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who is helping to shape the future of television rarely watches it. His decisions on high-speed Internet access will affect millions, but he'd rather play classical piano than surf the Web and he has never downloaded a tune. He's a top media industry watchdog but by no means a news junkie, only scanning Washington newspapers and skipping CNN most days. Despite such seeming contradictions, W.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
The architect of a Federal Communications Commission plan that would make media mergers easier is expected to leave the agency in March, following in the footsteps of Chairman Michael K. Powell, the agency disclosed Monday. W. Kenneth Ferree, 44, has been a lightning rod for criticism as the FCC's media bureau chief by championing looser ownership rules. Critics said the rules, which drew a record 520,000 written comments, would give too much clout to a few big media giants.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
The architect of a Federal Communications Commission plan that would make media mergers easier is expected to leave the agency in March, following in the footsteps of Chairman Michael K. Powell, the agency disclosed Monday. W. Kenneth Ferree, 44, has been a lightning rod for criticism as the FCC's media bureau chief by championing looser ownership rules. Critics said the rules, which drew a record 520,000 written comments, would give too much clout to a few big media giants.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who is helping to shape the future of television rarely watches it. His decisions on high-speed Internet access will affect millions, but he'd rather play classical piano than surf the Web and he has never downloaded a tune. He's a top media industry watchdog but by no means a news junkie, only scanning Washington newspapers and skipping CNN most days. Despite such seeming contradictions, W.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2002 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission's ambitious initiative to review the nation's media-ownership restrictions fell slightly behind schedule Tuesday as the agency agreed to extend the public-comment period by 30 days. But FCC officials said they still hoped to complete the comprehensive review by next spring as planned. Under pressure from consumer groups and Democratic Commissioner Michael J. Copps, FCC Media Bureau Chief W. Kenneth Ferree agreed to give interested parties until Jan.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to reject EchoStar Communications Corp.'s proposed $15-billion purchase of satellite rival DirecTV and its parent, Hughes Electronics Corp., perhaps as early as next week, sources said. Although a formal FCC vote has not occurred, a majority of commissioners, including Chairman Michael K. Powell, have decided that the deal is not in the public interest, sources said. Last week, the FCC staff, led by Media Bureau Chief W.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2006 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
A former Federal Communications Commission attorney said the agency, in its push to let media companies own more television stations, killed a 2004 study that showed that locally owned TV outlets broadcast more local news because the outcome conflicted with its own agenda. "The initial results were very compelling, and it was just stopped in its tracks because it was not the way the agency wanted to go," said Adam Candeub, an assistant law professor at Michigan State University.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Bowing to calls to delay the selection of a new president amid concern that the leading candidate was too partisan, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting agreed Monday to wait until Wednesday to choose a new chief executive. Public broadcasting stations and a group of Democrats on Capitol Hill had pressed Kenneth Y.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2003 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to relax its rules to let a single company own up to three television stations and one newspaper in large markets such as Los Angeles and New York, according to sources familiar with agency plans. Current regulations limit companies to two TV stations in a market and prevent a company with TV stations from owning a newspaper in the same market.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2003 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission staff recommended Tuesday that the agency approve News Corp.'s $6-billion takeover of satellite giant DirecTV but proposed conditions to prevent Rupert Murdoch's entertainment company from wielding too much clout, sources said. The staff report -- circulated Tuesday evening to the five FCC commissioners -- warned that News Corp. might try to withhold its network of Fox television stations from local cable providers to push customers to DirecTV.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators on Thursday accelerated the nation's conversion to digital television when it gave manufacturers a 2007 deadline to equip most new sets with tuners that will offer viewers better-quality pictures and enhanced sound. The Federal Communications Commission's vote may raise the price of new TVs, possibly by as much as $200, even for those consumers who don't want digital TV.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2003 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael K. Powell on Thursday brushed aside calls that he slow down the agency's review of media ownership rules, and said he would ask for a vote on proposed reforms by June 2. But as the political dance over the controversial issue gets into full swing at the FCC, some commissioners are complaining that Powell is withholding key details about potential rule changes and playing favorites by giving some commissioners more information than others.
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