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NEWS
November 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Abdurrahman Wahid blamed the army and police Friday for the escalating violence in Aceh province and the deaths of at least 19 civilians before a separatist rally. Wahid said he will summon military chief Adm. Widodo Adisutjipto, Army Commander Gen. Endriarto Sutarto and national police Chief Gen. Bimantoro to explain the use of violence against pro-independence activists.
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NEWS
December 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A day after a visit by Indonesia's president aimed at easing tensions between rebels and the military, nine people were killed Wednesday in a rash of shootings in troubled Aceh province. A separatist leader warned of civil war if a fragile six-month cease-fire that expires next month is not renewed. "There will be war. It will get much worse," separatist Zaini Abdullah said by telephone from Stockholm, where he and other rebel leaders are living in exile.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
Government officials and security chiefs have rejected Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid's request to release five separatist leaders, news reports said Saturday. The refusal is a blow for Wahid, who has faced increasing criticism from human rights groups and foreign governments over a crackdown on separatists in Indonesia's restive provinces.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
President Abdurrahman Wahid refused to appear before a parliamentary panel investigating a corruption scam but said he would reply in writing to any questions it had. The scandal centers on the theft of $4 million from Bulog, the state logistics agency. Wahid's alleged role in the affair has fueled calls for him to step down and undermined confidence in the government's ability to clean up graft in the country. Wahid has denied all knowledge of the affair.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdurrahman Wahid, Indonesia's unlikely new president, is one of the nation's most respected intellects, a man who loves soccer and Mozart, has a quick sense of humor and often finds himself at odds with the establishment. Born to one of Indonesia's most influential Muslim families, the 59-year-old cleric has long championed human rights, democracy, the separation of church--or mosque--and state, and a tolerant Islam that reaches out to non-Muslims in this diverse society.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Abdurrahman Wahid announced Wednesday that he will hand over the day-to-day responsibility of running the troubled Indonesian government to his vice president, Megawati Sukarnoputri.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | By SLOBODAN LEKIC, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indonesia's new president inaugurated his Cabinet on Friday with a firm warning that the corruption that has infested the country for decades will no longer be tolerated. President Abdurrahman Wahid took office last week, raising hopes that he can continue Indonesia's transition to democracy after more than 30 years of autocratic rule capped by two years of political instability, economic crisis and civil unrest.
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
Police fired warning shots Thursday and beat demonstrators at the national parliament, where opposing groups rallied for and against President Abdurrahman Wahid. At least four protesters were injured. The violence started after police separated the two sides.
NEWS
July 23, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a desperate attempt to hold on to power, President Abdurrahman Wahid issued an emergency decree early today "freezing" the nation's highest governing body as it prepared to vote him out of office. As the nation plunged into a constitutional crisis, leaders of the People's Consultative Assembly defied the president's directive, convened within hours and prepared to dismiss him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1999 | PETER DALE SCOTT, Peter Dale Scott, a former Canadian diplomat, is an author and retired UC Berkeley professor
Six months ago, observers feared that Indonesia's transition from military dictatorship to electoral democracy might cause the country to break apart. Today, with the election of moderates as president and vice president, the nation has taken a step toward a stable, constitutional future. Abdurrahman Wahid, the new president, is perhaps the nation's most respected leader.
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