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Wailers

ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Among the most eye- and ear-opening, glorious surprises I experienced on the job last year was catching the Wailers at the Coach House. Going into the show, I had a bad attitude about the whole thing--surely, this would be a reggae version of one of those ersatz Coasters or Ink Spots that tours the country with anonymous nobodies in the lineup, dragging the group's name through the mud to make a few quick bucks off people's nostalgia.
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NEWS
May 25, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Reggae Sunsplash concert unfolds for a few lazy hours Monday afternoon at the Santa Barbara County Bowl as California becomes a temporary territory of Jamaica. Every sentence will in end in mon and dreadlocks will be as ubiquitous as the pot smoke, while the Wailing Souls, Dennis Brown, Big Mountain and others entertain the slow dancers. Lloyd (Bread) MacDonald and Winston (Pipe) Matthews are the head Wailers, reggae pioneers dating back to pre-fame Bob Marley.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
This Halloween season, for the first time, Universal Studios Hollywood introduced a character based on the Latin American myth of La Llorona in its annual Halloween Horror Nights in an effort to connect with Southern California's sizable Latino population. The legend of La Llorona has gone through many variations over the years. It is a folktale about a woman who drowned her children after she was abandoned by their father. Tormented by what she has done, the woman's spirit wanders the earth, crying out for her dead children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1987 | DON SNOWDEN
Strip away the charisma of Bob Marley and the visual color and backing harmonies of the I-Threes and you're left with the archetypal roots reggae that the Wailers delivered at the Country Club Wednesday. Trimmed to a no-frills septet, the late Marley's former band delighted the crowd of 500, but the 90-minute set raised questions about the future. There were few problems in execution as the Wailers took most of the Marley standards that dominated the set at a slightly slowed pace.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
There is too much affirmation, warmth and spirituality in Joe Higgs' reggae music to warrant mentioning him in the same sentence as Ebenezer Scrooge. However, the Jamaican singer and the Dickensian grinch do have one problem in common: a hard time shaking free from Marley's ghost. In "A Christmas Carol," Jacob Marley's baleful spirit returns to help teach Scrooge the error of his coldhearted ways.
NEWS
February 16, 2006
The annual Ragga Muffins Festival hasn't restored the "Bob Marley Day" that used to be part of its name, but for its 25th staging the reggae extravaganza has made a concerted move toward the classic roots reggae associated with Marley and away from the contemporary dancehall sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
If anything is certain in the everything-is-subject-to-debate world of pop music, it'sthat Bob Marley is reggae music's greatest figure. The late singer's commentary and passion influenced everyone from the Clash and U2 to Rage Against the Machine. It's a tribute to Marley's ability to connect with new generations of listeners that his "Legend," a 14-song best-of album, has sold more than 10 million copies in the U.S.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | ROY RIVENBURG
In addition to professional body watchers, there also is a long tradition of professional grievers--from ancient Greeks to George Bush. Among the earliest prototypes were wailing women placed in Roman and Greek funeral processions. Their role was to appease departed spirits upset over insufficient displays of sorrow, according to "The History of American Funeral Directing," by Robert W. Habenstein and William M. Lamers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The longtime bass player for Bob Marley's group the Wailers lost his London lawsuit Monday seeking a share of the late reggae legend's royalties. Aston "Family Man" Barrett was seeking the equivalent of up to $115 million he claimed he was owed since Marley died in 1981 without making a will.
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