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Walden Pond

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NEWS
August 26, 1990 | ALICE KAHN
Imagine that you have spent too much time rubbing your nose in reality and want out. Imagine that you have gotten to a point in life where peace and quiet have become an obsession. Imagine that you have lived most of your life in the noisy, crowded world where a broom is not something you clean with but something you use to communicate with your upstairs neighbor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Naturalist Anne LaBastille became something of a cult hero among modern women for embracing a distinctly frontier past. When her marriage fell apart in the mid-1960s, she took refuge in the wilderness, building a log cabin on a hidden lake in the Adirondack Mountains and then carving an influential writing career out of her remote existence. Both the women's and environmental movements were on the rise in 1976 when she published "Woodswoman," the first in a four-volume autobiographical series that celebrated her adventures — and inspired women across the nation to engage in the great outdoors.
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NEWS
August 5, 1988 | United Press International
Plans to build an office park near Walden Pond, where 19th-Century naturalist Henry David Thoreau once made his home, will undergo an "exhaustive environmental review" before construction can begin, state officials said Thursday. The proposed developer of the project will file an environmental notification form that will then be subject to public comment. The project has been strongly opposed by the Thoreau Country Conservation Alliance Inc.
TRAVEL
August 16, 2009 | Susan Spano
Trillium, goldenstar, five spot, wild bleeding heart. They sound like the ingredients for a magic potion. Actually, they are what I found blooming at the New England Wild Flower Society's Garden in the Woods near Framingham, about 20 miles west of Boston. The 45-acre preserve is no vast, encyclopedic horticultural museum; it's no Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, England. It is, instead, a precious, little safe box containing the native plants of Massachusetts, especially its wildflowers.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | DANA KENNEDY, Associated Press
Henry Caswell cooks his dinner every night, takes a drive once a day and is eager to show off the trailer he has occupied across from Walden Pond for more than 40 years. Caswell, 94, is cheerful about his life and surroundings here in a wooded area that writer Henry David Thoreau made famous. But there is a pall that hangs over the rustic trailer park. Walden Breezes is dying.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | GEORGE JAHN, Associated Press
A conservation group trying to ban swimming and limit picnicking and hiking at Walden Pond, where Henry David Thoreau contemplated the simple life, has found itself at odds with the Massachusetts Audubon Society. The Walden Forever Wild Committee says swimmers are causing serious environmental damage to the pond and its environs. But the society says the committee is pushing a political and symbolic issue, not an environmental one.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walden Woods, that bucolic setting of the Henry David Thoreau manifesto that has inspired philosophers and naturalists for more than a century, has become a battleground pitting two of the most noble modern-day causes: the environment and affordable housing. Environmental and historical groups want to block a 135-unit condominium complex from being built less than a mile from Walden Pond, and a 148,000-square-foot office park even closer.
MAGAZINE
October 16, 1994 | Nathaniel Hawthorne
Sometimes the footsteps of the famous overlap. When Henry David Thoreau built his cabin in 1845 at Walden Pond, near Concord, Mass., the pond itself and the surrounding woods were already well-known to his contemporaries. Ralph Waldo Emerson owned the land on which the pond stood, and Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, the writer and editor Margaret Fuller and other literary lights of the time frequented the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Naturalist Anne LaBastille became something of a cult hero among modern women for embracing a distinctly frontier past. When her marriage fell apart in the mid-1960s, she took refuge in the wilderness, building a log cabin on a hidden lake in the Adirondack Mountains and then carving an influential writing career out of her remote existence. Both the women's and environmental movements were on the rise in 1976 when she published "Woodswoman," the first in a four-volume autobiographical series that celebrated her adventures — and inspired women across the nation to engage in the great outdoors.
SPORTS
January 21, 1989
Who goofed? Larry Stewart shows a shocking ignorance and a reprehensible disregard for facts when he labels Mark Scott "the Vin Scully of the '50s in Los Angeles." In the 1950s, Bob Kelley was the voice of the Los Angeles Angels and Sam Balter was the principal voice of the Hollywood Stars, although Tom Harmon and Fred Hessler also did some work at Gilmore Field. Balter and Kelley feuded on their radio shows (Balter at 5:45 on KLAC and Kelley at 6 on KMPC), a feud that occasionally flares anew even today through Kelley's writer, Jim Healy.
TRAVEL
June 14, 2009 | Susannah Rosenblatt
"The change from storm and winter to serene and mild weather, from dark and sluggish hours to bright and elastic ones, is a memorable crisis which all things proclaim." -- So Henry David Thoreau described the ever-changing woods of Walden Pond in 1846, during his experiment in living deliberately. More than a century and a half later, visitors to the clapboard-dotted meadows of Concord can discover the same thing for themselves.
MAGAZINE
June 6, 2004 | Marc Porter Zasada, Marc Porter Zasada is a freelance writer living in Los Angeles. His weekly radio commentary, "The Urban Man," will debut on KCRW beginning June 6.
In the metropolis, everyone needs a sustaining myth, and usually it's called "retirement." Here's the plan: Toil hard. Make a name for yourself. Hire a financial advisor. When you get tired, give up that hard-earned name, sell your empty nest and leave the city to live in a detached 2+2 by a golf course in an "active adult community" along the I-10 or the I-15.
BOOKS
March 14, 2004 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Paths of Desire: The Passions of a Suburban Gardener Dominique Browning Scribner: 240 pp., $24 Spring is here. What's the next best thing to gardening? Reading about it. (Some may say better -- no messy dirt, no incriminating black thumbs.) Dominique Browning, editor in chief of House & Garden magazine writes about how her garden, less than a half-acre in Westchester, N.Y., "feels, or said another way, how the garden makes me, and those who visit, feel."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2003
Gina PICCALO'S description of postmodern "real" ("Looking for 'Real,' " Dec. 6) illustrates how absurdly ostentatious and deluded we have become as we search in vain for meaning through consumerism. As a high school teacher who has taught the philosophical significance of Thoreau and Emerson, I have to laugh at the hyperbole of sociologist Paul H. Ray when he asserts that "now we're talking about tens of millions" of people who have embraced the same simplicity that Henry David Thoreau espoused in "Walden."
OPINION
March 9, 2002
Reading "Plan to Bag Rivers May Not Float," Eric Bailey's fine March 2 story on entrepreneur Ric Davidge's scheme to "suck fresh water from two North Coast rivers, stow it in massive poly-fiber bags . . . and tow the floating sacks . . . south . . . to slake San Diego's thirst," I recalled Henry David Thoreau's reaction to a similar scheme, on a much smaller scale, to install pipes to transport water from his beloved Walden Pond to homes in the nearby...
BUSINESS
April 5, 1998
Unfortunately, the salaries cited in "Supply of Skilled Machinists Is Tighter Than Ever" [March 18] are an exception to the rule. With the perks and salaries Superior Jig is offering, their base rate charged to their customers must be $150 to $175 per hour. Regretfully, 99% of the manufacturing industry's base rate is $45 to $65 per hour, and annual salaries of $20,000 to $35,000, excluding benefits, are more the norm. The manufacturing industry is a true laggard as far as wages go, despite the fact that machinists contribute to nearly all phases of what we have and what we can do. It is truly one of the most unappreciated and unrewarding trades, henceforth the shortage of skilled machinists.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1998
Unfortunately, the salaries cited in "Supply of Skilled Machinists Is Tighter Than Ever" [March 18] are an exception to the rule. With the perks and salaries Superior Jig is offering, their base rate charged to their customers must be $150 to $175 per hour. Regretfully, 99% of the manufacturing industry's base rate is $45 to $65 per hour, and annual salaries of $20,000 to $35,000, excluding benefits, are more the norm. The manufacturing industry is a true laggard as far as wages go, despite the fact that machinists contribute to nearly all phases of what we have and what we can do. It is truly one of the most unappreciated and unrewarding trades, henceforth the shortage of skilled machinists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2003
Gina PICCALO'S description of postmodern "real" ("Looking for 'Real,' " Dec. 6) illustrates how absurdly ostentatious and deluded we have become as we search in vain for meaning through consumerism. As a high school teacher who has taught the philosophical significance of Thoreau and Emerson, I have to laugh at the hyperbole of sociologist Paul H. Ray when he asserts that "now we're talking about tens of millions" of people who have embraced the same simplicity that Henry David Thoreau espoused in "Walden."
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | ROBIN ESTRIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The peaceful woods and clear waters lure Joseph Sevigny, with his fishing poles and 12-foot boat, to Walden Pond dozens of times a year. He tosses back the bass, but the trout often become dinner. It's a relaxing ritual enjoyed by countless others at the watering hole made famous by transcendentalist writer Henry David Thoreau, an angler himself. But a campaign is on to reel in the fishermen.
MAGAZINE
October 16, 1994 | Nathaniel Hawthorne
Sometimes the footsteps of the famous overlap. When Henry David Thoreau built his cabin in 1845 at Walden Pond, near Concord, Mass., the pond itself and the surrounding woods were already well-known to his contemporaries. Ralph Waldo Emerson owned the land on which the pond stood, and Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, the writer and editor Margaret Fuller and other literary lights of the time frequented the area.
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