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Walker Percy

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May 27, 1990 | FRANK LEVERING, Levering is a writer and orchardist in Orchard Gap, Va
On May 10 of this year, Binx Bolling, a stockbroker in New Orleans, emerged from the matinee screening of a Hollywood film and was told the news. Across town, word reached Lancelot Lamar in his madhouse cell. In Manhattan, Will Barrett, employed at night as a maintenance engineer at Macy's, received word as he was training his high-powered telescope on a young woman sitting on a bench in Central Park. And in Covington, La., across Lake Pontchartrain from New Orleans, Dr.
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September 18, 1994 | James Wilcox, James Wilcox's most recent novel is "Guest of a Sinner."
In an essay called "Stoicism in the South" the novelist Walker Percy observed: "The greatness of the South . . . had always a stronger Greek flavor than it ever had a Christian." So it is no surprise that in "The Moviegoer," Percy's award-winning 1961 novel, the patrician aunt sends her somewhat unmoored nephew a stern memo quoting the Stoic philosopher and emperor Marcus Aurelius, not St. Paul or New Orleans' Archbishop Rummel.
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May 11, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walker Percy, the late-blooming novelist who wrote in the manner of European existentialists yet whose fictional milieus were distinctly American, died of cancer Thursday at his home in Covington, La. The Associated Press said he was 74 when he died at his home on the banks of the Bogue Falaya River, across Lake Pontchatrain from New Orleans.
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February 7, 1993 | Harry Middleton, Middleton is the author of five books, including "The Earth Is Enough" and "On the Spine of Time." His next book, "Into That Bright Country," will be published by Simon & Schuster in July
I met Walker Percy in New Orleans in 1977. It was a cool autumn afternoon. The city glowed in soft golden sunlight and deep blue shadows. There was, I remember, a chilly wind blowing off the river. I had moved to the city less than a year before, after graduating from college, and had gotten a job writing for Figaro, a weekly newspaper. As it turned out, Percy was a fan of the paper, read it weekly, and happened to see my review of his latest novel, "Lancelot."
NEWS
October 10, 1987 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, Associated Press
Unless the name on the door is "Richard M. Ratzan MD," patients flipping through the available reading matter in a doctor's waiting room would hardly expect to have their traumas soothed by applications of medicinal literary trivia.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sin, semiotics and sucking the heads off crawfish were among the lifelong preoccupations of Walker Percy, as we discover in "Signposts in a Strange Land," a fat and satisfying anthology of the late novelist's essays, public addresses, letters, interviews and other literary ephemera.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a chilly afternoon, as Manhattan's rush hour filled the streets and sidewalks, friends and admirers of the late Walker Percy gathered in a hushed midtown church Wednesday to remember his living legacy as a writer. Percy, whose powerful novels about the South are studies in human faith and despair, was called a titan of American letters by such luminaries as Eudora Welty, Shelby Foote, Wilfrid Sheed, Mary Lee Settle and Stanley Kauffmann.
BOOKS
September 18, 1994 | James Wilcox, James Wilcox's most recent novel is "Guest of a Sinner."
In an essay called "Stoicism in the South" the novelist Walker Percy observed: "The greatness of the South . . . had always a stronger Greek flavor than it ever had a Christian." So it is no surprise that in "The Moviegoer," Percy's award-winning 1961 novel, the patrician aunt sends her somewhat unmoored nephew a stern memo quoting the Stoic philosopher and emperor Marcus Aurelius, not St. Paul or New Orleans' Archbishop Rummel.
BOOKS
February 7, 1993 | Harry Middleton, Middleton is the author of five books, including "The Earth Is Enough" and "On the Spine of Time." His next book, "Into That Bright Country," will be published by Simon & Schuster in July
I met Walker Percy in New Orleans in 1977. It was a cool autumn afternoon. The city glowed in soft golden sunlight and deep blue shadows. There was, I remember, a chilly wind blowing off the river. I had moved to the city less than a year before, after graduating from college, and had gotten a job writing for Figaro, a weekly newspaper. As it turned out, Percy was a fan of the paper, read it weekly, and happened to see my review of his latest novel, "Lancelot."
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sin, semiotics and sucking the heads off crawfish were among the lifelong preoccupations of Walker Percy, as we discover in "Signposts in a Strange Land," a fat and satisfying anthology of the late novelist's essays, public addresses, letters, interviews and other literary ephemera.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a chilly afternoon, as Manhattan's rush hour filled the streets and sidewalks, friends and admirers of the late Walker Percy gathered in a hushed midtown church Wednesday to remember his living legacy as a writer. Percy, whose powerful novels about the South are studies in human faith and despair, was called a titan of American letters by such luminaries as Eudora Welty, Shelby Foote, Wilfrid Sheed, Mary Lee Settle and Stanley Kauffmann.
BOOKS
October 7, 1990 | Thomas Cahill, Cahill is director of Religious Publishing for Doubleday and co-author of the forthcoming "Why Your Ears Are Crooked" (Ballantine)
Henry Kisor, whose story this is, is stone deaf and has been so since an illness at age 3. Now in his 50s, he is a working journalist at the height of his profession, book editor of the Chicago Sun-Times, husband (of a hearing woman), and father of college-age sons. Between the illness of the child and the success of the man lies the story, a lifelong struggle against what Dr. Johnson rightly called "the most desperate of human calamities."
BOOKS
May 27, 1990 | FRANK LEVERING, Levering is a writer and orchardist in Orchard Gap, Va
On May 10 of this year, Binx Bolling, a stockbroker in New Orleans, emerged from the matinee screening of a Hollywood film and was told the news. Across town, word reached Lancelot Lamar in his madhouse cell. In Manhattan, Will Barrett, employed at night as a maintenance engineer at Macy's, received word as he was training his high-powered telescope on a young woman sitting on a bench in Central Park. And in Covington, La., across Lake Pontchartrain from New Orleans, Dr.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walker Percy, the late-blooming novelist who wrote in the manner of European existentialists yet whose fictional milieus were distinctly American, died of cancer Thursday at his home in Covington, La. The Associated Press said he was 74 when he died at his home on the banks of the Bogue Falaya River, across Lake Pontchatrain from New Orleans.
BOOKS
April 12, 1987 | Richard Eder
"Thanatos" is the Greek word for death, and in his newest novel, which might be described as a philosophical thriller laced with Southern Discomfort, Walker Percy proposes that tenderness leads to the death ovens. He proposes this in the person of a disarranged Catholic priest who lives on a fire-watch platform in the Louisiana scrubland and periodically comes down to preach. But with Percy, who is ingenious and paradoxical, truth increases as the square of disarrangement.
BOOKS
October 7, 1990 | Thomas Cahill, Cahill is director of Religious Publishing for Doubleday and co-author of the forthcoming "Why Your Ears Are Crooked" (Ballantine)
Henry Kisor, whose story this is, is stone deaf and has been so since an illness at age 3. Now in his 50s, he is a working journalist at the height of his profession, book editor of the Chicago Sun-Times, husband (of a hearing woman), and father of college-age sons. Between the illness of the child and the success of the man lies the story, a lifelong struggle against what Dr. Johnson rightly called "the most desperate of human calamities."
NEWS
October 10, 1987 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, Associated Press
Unless the name on the door is "Richard M. Ratzan MD," patients flipping through the available reading matter in a doctor's waiting room would hardly expect to have their traumas soothed by applications of medicinal literary trivia.
BOOKS
April 12, 1987 | Richard Eder
"Thanatos" is the Greek word for death, and in his newest novel, which might be described as a philosophical thriller laced with Southern Discomfort, Walker Percy proposes that tenderness leads to the death ovens. He proposes this in the person of a disarranged Catholic priest who lives on a fire-watch platform in the Louisiana scrubland and periodically comes down to preach. But with Percy, who is ingenious and paradoxical, truth increases as the square of disarrangement.
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