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Walkway

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are those who say Los Angeles is a heartless city, that Downtown is dead. No one heads Downtown to "just hang out," and if they do it's a one-stop affair, perhaps an evening concert at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Once the applause dies down, it's straight back to the 'burbs in the comfort of an automobile.
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NEWS
August 17, 1995 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no telling what wildlife you might see if you take a stroll along Port Hueneme's Bubbling Springs Recreation Corridor, which follows a stream that meanders nearly two miles through the city to the ocean. The greenbelt is home to ducks, herons, egrets, terns, opossums. Former Mayor Dorill Wright thought he had seen it all until one day a couple of years ago when he spotted what looked like a fur coat tossed into the stream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1995 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The abandoned rail corridor south of National Boulevard in Culver City does not seem to offer obvious lessons about aiding American's troubled industrial landscapes. Weeds, junk and rusty tracks are the main features of the old Southern Pacific right of way nowadays. But if developer Frederick Samitaur Smith and architect Eric Owen Moss succeed, the half-mile-long, 50-foot-wide spur would become a model of avant-garde design and urban revitalization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1995 | LISA M. BOWMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid the tile-roofed stucco strip malls near the intersection of Thousand Oaks Boulevard and Moorpark Road, Elois Zeanah envisions a new downtown for the city: suburban-style. "We really don't have a downtown where people can congregate to visit, talk with friends and dine or see entertainment," the Thousand Oaks councilwoman said. "We just don't have that common sense of place."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1995 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cypress College officials have asked state legislators for $735,000 in emergency money to repair a vital campus walkway that could be dangerous in an earthquake. Parts of the piazza, a distinctive piece of architecture at the college, were fenced off for safety Monday in case of a temblor, North Orange County Community College District spokeswoman Donna Hatchett said.
NEWS
May 7, 1995
A community panel has recommended that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority approve a 19-foot pedestrian walkway that would lead from a proposed light-rail station on the outskirts of Chinatown into the neighborhood. The vote ended nearly a year of community meetings on what type of platform should be built to connect the station at Alameda and College streets to Broadway, the heart of the neighborhood. The choice was between a 16-foot, a 19-foot and a 30-foot elevated platform.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ
Landowners with property close to a proposed light-rail station in Chinatown have offered to join the Metropolitan Transportation Authority in development of a pedestrian walkway that would lead from the station into the heart of the historic neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The "piazza," a distinctive element in Cypress College's award-winning architectural design, is now a target of concern in an earthquake-safety study. This second-level walkway and plaza that connects the major buildings on campus is among the structures in the North Orange County Community College District that may require seismic retrofitting. The district, already struggling with a financial crisis because of the county bankruptcy, is searching for outside funding sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1994 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Webster figures that if he does his job right, no one will notice. Webster, you see, is a master trail builder--one of a small fraternity of backcountry enthusiasts who hack walkways out of the wilderness. "I try to build them so that people don't think they're walking on a trail," said Webster. "I want them to think they're just walking in the woods."
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | GORDON DILLOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We are perched on the westernmost side of the continent, at the very water's edge, and yet somehow it still isn't quite far enough. So we build piers. They jut from every South Bay beach town, from Manhattan to Hermosa to Redondo, fingers of wood or concrete reaching out to the sea. For more than a hundred years we have built them, enjoyed them, watched them get knocked down by waves or fires, and then built them up again.
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