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Wallace Stegner

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NEWS
April 27, 2003
Susan Salter Reynolds did a balanced, thorough and commendable job of describing the complicated literary debt that Wallace Stegner owes to Mary Hallock Foote, and I am extremely grateful to Reynolds and The Times for bringing this important story to light ("Tangle of Repose," March 23). But it is ironic that Reynolds did not acknowledge where she acquired much of the material that composed her article: the premise and arguments put forth in my play "Fair Use." In addition to a copy of the play, I handed Reynolds years of research that went into the writing of it: the Stegner letters, Foote letters and documents attached to the issue; salient quotes pulled from books and interviews about and with Stegner; work I had done tying Stegner's work to Foote's work; even introductions to the Foote family members whom she interviewed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
Decades before she won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, Maxine Kumin was a student at Radcliffe College who had summoned the courage to show a handful of her poems to an instructor. His comment couldn't have been more withering. "Say it with flowers," he wrote, "but for God's sake don't try to write poems. " Kumin heeded his advice. Seven years passed before she tried again, but this time her efforts brought far more encouraging results. With a clear-eyed vision of the natural world, relationships, mortality and the inner lives of women, Kumin became one of the country's most honored poets, whose fourth book of poetry, "Up Country," brought her the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
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BOOKS
May 13, 1990 | Clark Kimball
" . . . recollections that remind us that life itself is natural and inevitably attaining growth; repeated questions that ask how we will choose to grow in what directions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | Elaine Woo
Philip L. Fradkin, a native New Yorker whose fascination with the West turned him into an astute chronicler of the region's history and environmental legacy in books on such topics as the great San Francisco earthquake, nuclear test fallout in Nevada and the survival of the Colorado River, died Saturday at his home in Point Reyes Station, Calif. He was 77. The cause was cancer, said his son, Alex. A reporter for The Times early in his career, Fradkin was the author of 13 books, including "A River No More: The Colorado River and the West" (1981)
OPINION
June 7, 1992 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a contributing reporter to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered." He interviewed Wallace Stegner from the author's home in Los Altos Hills, Calif
As a pioneer on the frontier of environmental consciousness, Wallace Stegner recognized 50 years ago that the West was not a limitless Land of Opportunity. He understood our behavior toward the land would create just the kind of social, economic and environmental problems that plague California today--overpopulation, depleted resources, pollution, social unrest. He came to these conclusions not as a politician or scientist, but as a writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
THE California writer Wallace Stegner is well known to readers for novels such as "Angle of Repose" and "Crossing to Safety." But Stegner had another dimension, as an advocate for a literary West -- especially the West of mountains and desert and big sky -- not often enough heard from.
BOOKS
November 18, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
WALLACE STEGNER presented an intriguing blend of hubris and humility. He remains well-loved by scholars and readers, but often with an odd defensiveness that raises hackles. Stegner himself often admonished his admirers to calm down: "If I am going to develop a claque," he wrote to James Hepworth in 1988, "how can I be at peace with my greatness if my supporters are all shooting each other like splinter-groups of Lebanese and Palestinians?"
BOOKS
February 10, 2008 | Peter Richardson, Peter Richardson is the author of "American Prophet: The Life and Work of Carey McWilliams." His book on the history and influence of Ramparts magazine will be published next year.
PHILIP FRADKIN'S skillful biography of Wallace Stegner may induce a mild case of lifestyle envy. As director of Stanford's creative writing program, Stegner had it made: light duties, a pleasant setting and extravagantly gifted students. When he and his wife weren't horseback riding to the nearby coastal mountains, they traveled widely, usually on someone else's dime; a pride of prestigious fellowships saw to that.
BOOKS
December 1, 1996 | JULIE KIRGO, Julie Kirgo is the author of "New Mexico: Portrait of the Land and Its People" (New Mexico Geographic Series). She interviewed Wallace Stegner several months before his death in Santa Fe in 1993
Wallace Stegner was, by his own admission, "a square," a middle-class white male writing out of a straightforward realist tradition that had become, to use his word "unfashionable." And in fact, although Stegner's staggeringly varied career--as novelist, biographer, essayist, historian, environmentalist and founder of Stanford University's superlative creative writing program--was, in the words of Malcolm Cowley, "unequaled in this century," his reputation remains, in relative terms, modest.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Wallace Stegner, the novelist whose sense of the land and the rootlessness of the West filled his books as well as his life, has died in Santa Fe, N.M., of injuries suffered in a car accident. He was 84. Stegner, who lived in Los Altos Hills, Calif., was injured March 28 while in Santa Fe to deliver a speech and died Tuesday night at St. Vincent Hospital there.
TRAVEL
April 8, 2012 | By Mike Ives, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Wallace Stegner wrote books about the American and Canadian West, so it's understandable that people consider the longtime California resident a Western author. Stegner, a prolific novelist, essayist, conservation advocate and professor at Stanford University, was born in 1909 in Iowa and grew up in Utah and Saskatchewan, Canada. Today he is chiefly remembered for his fictional portraits of steely homesteaders and his musings on the American wilderness. But Stegner lived in Vermont most summers from the late 1930s until his death in 1993, and he considered the small Vermont village of Greensboro his home away from home.
BOOKS
February 10, 2008 | Peter Richardson, Peter Richardson is the author of "American Prophet: The Life and Work of Carey McWilliams." His book on the history and influence of Ramparts magazine will be published next year.
PHILIP FRADKIN'S skillful biography of Wallace Stegner may induce a mild case of lifestyle envy. As director of Stanford's creative writing program, Stegner had it made: light duties, a pleasant setting and extravagantly gifted students. When he and his wife weren't horseback riding to the nearby coastal mountains, they traveled widely, usually on someone else's dime; a pride of prestigious fellowships saw to that.
OPINION
February 6, 2008
Re "A classic, or a fraud?" Opinion, Feb. 3 Philip L. Fradkin points out that you can't libel a dead person -- which is, perhaps, unfortunate for Wallace Stegner. Of course, Stegner probably wouldn't have been too concerned about it. He understood how writers embellish the details of people's lives (as Mary Foote, no doubt, also understood) to create fiction, and would've thought it preposterous to suggest such details could be considered plagiarism or copyright infringement, or even worse, immoral.
OPINION
February 3, 2008 | Philip L. Fradkin, Philip L. Fradkin is the author of 11 books about the American West and Alaska, including "Wallace Stegner and the American West," to be published this month.
Plagiarism is apparently so rife these days that it would not be surprising to discover that "The Little Book of Plagiarism," by Richard A. Posner, has itself been plagiarized. What is this modern-day phenomenon that has spread like poison ivy through the ranks of novelists, historians, academics, scientists, students and almost anyone who uses and publishes words?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
THE California writer Wallace Stegner is well known to readers for novels such as "Angle of Repose" and "Crossing to Safety." But Stegner had another dimension, as an advocate for a literary West -- especially the West of mountains and desert and big sky -- not often enough heard from.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
WITH little fanfare, a new book by Wallace Steg- ner, set in a dry land and exploring natural resources -- an obsession his western fiction explored -- has just been published. In the Los Angeles Times Book Review, Nick Owchar called the book "a great adventure story." But according to some of the author's inner circle, the book -- written as a work-for-hire job for a group of U.S. oil companies based in Arabia in the 1950s -- should never have seen the light of day.
BOOKS
December 1, 1996 | JOHN BALZAR, John Balzar is a Times national correspondent and contributing writer to Book Review
Collections of appreciation are field guides. These are the first to attempt explanation of the writing of Wallace Stegner and to inquire how we might finish a simple and, in his case, impossible sentence: Wallace Stegner, who. . . . Who evoked panoramas by looking through clean and ordinary windows, and who brought calm appraisal to agitated events in the developing West. Who, never mind the flash and fizzle of other gloried American writers, grew in stature and accomplishment all his life--steady gains--so that now, looking back 2 1/2 years after his death, this itself can be recognized as a lasting achievement.
BOOKS
November 18, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
WALLACE STEGNER presented an intriguing blend of hubris and humility. He remains well-loved by scholars and readers, but often with an odd defensiveness that raises hackles. Stegner himself often admonished his admirers to calm down: "If I am going to develop a claque," he wrote to James Hepworth in 1988, "how can I be at peace with my greatness if my supporters are all shooting each other like splinter-groups of Lebanese and Palestinians?"
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