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Wallace Stevens

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November 16, 1997
The palm at the end of the mind, Beyond the last thought, rises In the bronze decor, A gold-feathered bird Sings in the palm, without human meaning, Without human feeling, a foreign song. You know then that it is not the reason That makes us happy or unhappy. The bird sings. Its feathers shine. The palm stands on the edge of space. The wind moves slowly in the branches. The bird's fire-fangled feathers dangle down.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010 | By John Freeman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Book review: ‘The Best of It: New and Selected Poems' by Kay Ryan The Best of It New and Selected Poems Kay Ryan Grove: 270 pp., $24 Contemporary poetry is a bit like visual art. Much of it makes you grab your chin and nod in stumped appreciation — but you wouldn't want to live with it. Kay Ryan's work, however, hangs well no matter where it goes. Clouds, calendars, time, birds, jackrabbits. Everything her eye falls upon takes on a brisk, beautifully complete clarity.
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NEWS
October 12, 1988 | JONATHAN KIRSCH
Wallace Stevens: The Later Years, 1923-1955 by Joan Richardson (Morrow/Beech Tree Books: $24.95, 544 pages) "Oh, blessed rage for order . . . / The maker's rage to order words of the sea. . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
For more than a decade of his retirement, Louis Fletcher has lived in the same apartment complex on Olive Street downtown. But the view keeps changing. These days, when Fletcher looks out past the chairs and plants on his north-facing 16th-story balcony, he sees the east end of the twisted, gleaming, metallic and nearly complete Walt Disney Concert Hall. Or, as some of his 1,300 neighbors in Angelus Plaza (average age: 80) prefer to call it, the Dead Aluminum Bird.
BOOKS
November 16, 1997 | JOHN HOLLANDER, John Hollander is the author of numerous books, including "Selected Poetry," "Tesserae and Other Poems" and the anthology "Committed to Memory." He is the A. Bartlett Giamatti professor of English at Yale University and chancellor of the Academy of American Poets
Literary anecdotes abound with traded rhetorical punches; a celebrated exchange in American literature is that between Ernest Hemingway and Scott Fitzgerald, the latter observing (as he had at the opening of his wonderful story "The Rich Boy") that the very rich are different from us, and Hemingway presumably winning the two-blow bout by his debunking, "Yes, they have more money."
BOOKS
February 7, 1999
The house was quiet and the world was calm. The reader became the book; and summer night Was like the conscious being of the book. The house was quiet and the world was calm. The words were spoken as if there was no book, Except that the reader leaned above the page, Wanted to lean, wanted much most to be The scholar to whom his book is true, to whom The summer night is like a perfection of thought. The house was quiet because it had to be.
BOOKS
October 13, 1985 | John Espey, Espey is professor emeritus of literature at UCLA. and
The legend of Wallace Stevens' mutually exclusive lives as poet and insurance lawyer has become such a standard approach to commenting on his poetry that one resists giving it up. Not that anyone literally believed in it, but it was such an alluring way to define certain aspects of 20th-Century romanticism that it was close to irresistible.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010 | By John Freeman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Book review: ‘The Best of It: New and Selected Poems' by Kay Ryan The Best of It New and Selected Poems Kay Ryan Grove: 270 pp., $24 Contemporary poetry is a bit like visual art. Much of it makes you grab your chin and nod in stumped appreciation — but you wouldn't want to live with it. Kay Ryan's work, however, hangs well no matter where it goes. Clouds, calendars, time, birds, jackrabbits. Everything her eye falls upon takes on a brisk, beautifully complete clarity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001
Richard Pendleton Rogers, 57, director of the Film Studies Center at Harvard University and a documentary filmmaker, died Saturday of melanoma at his summer home in Wainscott, N.Y. Rogers made several films for PBS, including documentaries on William Carlos Williams, William Kennedy and Wallace Stevens. With his wife, documentary photographer Susan Meiselas, he made "Pictures From a Revolution," a film about Nicaragua. Born in New York City, Rogers graduated from Harvard in 1957 and was a Fulbright scholar at the Royal College of Arts in London.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1990
The recent article on Cal State San Marcos ("A Different Drummer," Sept. 24) pointed out in a generally factual manner certain "differences" to be found on this new campus. But, as an instructor here, I am concerned that the facts apply to matters of form more than substance, and thus, in the understandable pursuit of novelty and humor, the article may have given an incomplete, even incorrect, impression. For example, suppose that I pioneer the "drive-up" office hour, as indeed, I have done, with tongue in cheek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001
Richard Pendleton Rogers, 57, director of the Film Studies Center at Harvard University and a documentary filmmaker, died Saturday of melanoma at his summer home in Wainscott, N.Y. Rogers made several films for PBS, including documentaries on William Carlos Williams, William Kennedy and Wallace Stevens. With his wife, documentary photographer Susan Meiselas, he made "Pictures From a Revolution," a film about Nicaragua. Born in New York City, Rogers graduated from Harvard in 1957 and was a Fulbright scholar at the Royal College of Arts in London.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER ROBINSON, Christopher Robinson is professor of European literature at Oxford University and the author of several books, including "C.P. Cavafy" and "French Literature in the Twentieth Century."
It is an odd fact that poets tend to be either larger-than-life figures of rebellion, as Lord Byron and Allen Ginsberg were, or that they happen to lead lives of (at least outward) banal conformity: Mallarme the schoolmaster, Philip Larkin the librarian, Wallace Stevens the insurance man. Constantine P. Cavafy belonged firmly to the latter group.
BOOKS
February 7, 1999
The house was quiet and the world was calm. The reader became the book; and summer night Was like the conscious being of the book. The house was quiet and the world was calm. The words were spoken as if there was no book, Except that the reader leaned above the page, Wanted to lean, wanted much most to be The scholar to whom his book is true, to whom The summer night is like a perfection of thought. The house was quiet because it had to be.
BOOKS
July 5, 1998
The houses are haunted By white night-gowns. None are green, Or purple with green rings, Or green with yellow rings, Or yellow with blue rings. None of them are strange, With socks of lace And beaded ceintures. People are not going To dream of baboons and periwinkles. Only, here and there, an old sailor, Drunk and asleep in his boots, Catches tigers In red weather. From "An Introduction to Poetry," edited by X. J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia (Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers: 652 pp., $30.
BOOKS
November 16, 1997
The palm at the end of the mind, Beyond the last thought, rises In the bronze decor, A gold-feathered bird Sings in the palm, without human meaning, Without human feeling, a foreign song. You know then that it is not the reason That makes us happy or unhappy. The bird sings. Its feathers shine. The palm stands on the edge of space. The wind moves slowly in the branches. The bird's fire-fangled feathers dangle down.
BOOKS
November 16, 1997 | JOHN HOLLANDER, John Hollander is the author of numerous books, including "Selected Poetry," "Tesserae and Other Poems" and the anthology "Committed to Memory." He is the A. Bartlett Giamatti professor of English at Yale University and chancellor of the Academy of American Poets
Literary anecdotes abound with traded rhetorical punches; a celebrated exchange in American literature is that between Ernest Hemingway and Scott Fitzgerald, the latter observing (as he had at the opening of his wonderful story "The Rich Boy") that the very rich are different from us, and Hemingway presumably winning the two-blow bout by his debunking, "Yes, they have more money."
BOOKS
October 12, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Ezra Pound amended and corrected T.S. Eliot into producing the definitive version of his masterpiece, "The Waste Land." As the magisterial Muse of Modern Poetry, Pound did less well by Marianne Moore. In 1919, just feeling her way into his company and that of her other peers, Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, she was deferential enough to smooth out: You are right, that swiftmoving sternly Intentioned swaybacked baboon is nothing to you and the chimpanzee.
BOOKS
February 15, 1987 | Henri Coulette, Coulette, a former Lamont winner and Guggenheim fellow, teaches at Cal State L.A
"Characteristically American" is the epithet that graces the dust jacket of this new, revised edition of the first 30 years of William Carlos Williams' achievement. It is an apt phrase; it is also a varietal and prejudicial one, for it discriminates among persons, places and things American. When we use it, we do not mean Sunset Boulevard as it wends through Beverly Hills; we mean Sunset east of Western. We mean the World Series, not the America's Cup; H.S.T., not J.F.K., and in poetry, Dr.
BOOKS
October 12, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Ezra Pound amended and corrected T.S. Eliot into producing the definitive version of his masterpiece, "The Waste Land." As the magisterial Muse of Modern Poetry, Pound did less well by Marianne Moore. In 1919, just feeling her way into his company and that of her other peers, Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, she was deferential enough to smooth out: You are right, that swiftmoving sternly Intentioned swaybacked baboon is nothing to you and the chimpanzee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1990
The recent article on Cal State San Marcos ("A Different Drummer," Sept. 24) pointed out in a generally factual manner certain "differences" to be found on this new campus. But, as an instructor here, I am concerned that the facts apply to matters of form more than substance, and thus, in the understandable pursuit of novelty and humor, the article may have given an incomplete, even incorrect, impression. For example, suppose that I pioneer the "drive-up" office hour, as indeed, I have done, with tongue in cheek.
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