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NEWS
November 11, 2012
When we first reported on the Fuoco wallpaper back in 2010, we noted that the design by the New York firm Trove essentially wrapped a room in history, a frozen-in-time moment inside Teatro La Fenice of Venice, Italy. Destroyed by fire in 1836, the opera house -- pictured here after the reconstruction -- burned to the ground again in 1996. The visual drama of the space, however, lives on a bit longer thanks to Anthropologie. The store has announced that its website will sell Trove's design as pre-pasted wallpaper "for easy consumer application.
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NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Hear the name “Scalamandré,” and those in the know think Italian luxury. Others picture the company's famed chinoiserie and think high French style. But one of the surprises in Steven Stolman's new book about the legendary fabric and wallpaper company is the extent to which Scalamandré is actually a very American story - founded in 1929 by an Italian immigrant on Long Island. “Like so many other businesses born out of the Depression,” Stolman said during an L.A. stop on his book tour, “I think that has a lot to do with the grit of immigrants, who fled some kind of depression at home and came to America with such drive.” As president of the company, Stolman has been leading his own drive, reviving the Scalamandré brand by putting its signature patterns on Lenox china , launching a Scalamandré lighting collection this fall and unleashing the company's beloved zebra pattern on sheets and pillows sold through Neiman Marcus , Gracious Home and Horchow . Those zebras also prance across the front on Stolman's book, “Scalamandré: Haute Décor” (Gibbs Smith, $75)
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NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Dutch designer Inke Heiland may be best known for playful animal-silhouette wall decor for kids, but her new line of whimsical pendant lamps will charm more than a few parents.   The new Inke pendant lights are made from the same floral vintage wallpapers as the popular assemble-it-yourself animal and tree silhouettes. The lamps are about $115 and come ready to install, complete with fitting, ceiling cap and a woven electrical cord in several color combinations. Because they are made from vintage wallpaper, they are limited editions with irregularities that add to their charm.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | By Melissa Rohlin
Basketball forums across the Web are constantly filled with a question that can never be answered: Who is the best basketball player of all time? Looks as though fans aren't the only ones wondering. The wallpaper on Lebron James' cellphone apparently is a digitally created photo of himself standing in triple-threat position as Michael Jordan, in his prime, guards him. "Jordan was my superhero growing up," James told Sports Illustrated. "He was the guy I feel helped me get to where I am today.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | By Melissa Rohlin
Basketball forums across the Web are constantly filled with a question that can never be answered: Who is the best basketball player of all time? Looks as though fans aren't the only ones wondering. The wallpaper on Lebron James' cellphone apparently is a digitally created photo of himself standing in triple-threat position as Michael Jordan, in his prime, guards him. "Jordan was my superhero growing up," James told Sports Illustrated. "He was the guy I feel helped me get to where I am today.
TRAVEL
April 30, 2006
THE information in "Kew Palace Reopening to Public" [News, Tips, Bargains, April 23] piqued my curiosity. Reading that Mad King George was confined to the palace and was later determined to suffer from the central nervous disorder porphyria was quite interesting. When it was further stated that the Kew has now been restored and preserved with bright green wallpaper, it brought to mind a fact that I had read. By the 18th century, green wallpaper was no longer recommended for dining rooms because arsenic was used in the pigment.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | SHERRY ANGEL
People still hang their own wallpaper, but it takes a bit of courage--and a lot of caution--to do a good job with today's heavier, more expensive vinyl papers. Kim Farthing of Farthing Interiors in Newport Beach suggests hiring a professional to hang high-quality paper. But, she advises, make sure the firm is licensed and has liability insurance--and check references.
NEWS
June 3, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer and
When John T. Hall goes to work each morning, he eagerly confronts something most of us would just as soon pass by--walls in need of wallpaper, and sometimes wallpaper that needs to be stripped. Hall is a professional paperhanger, an artist whose canvas is a bare wall on which he carefully creates the special looks his customers crave. From Hall's perspective, of course, most people would be better off turning to a professional if papering is part of their decorating plan. The Laguna Niguel resident has been hanging paper since 1973 and has learned a few tricks in the ensuing 16 years.
HOME & GARDEN
January 1, 2011 | By Emily Young, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Alix Soubiran could live quite happily without a stick of furniture. "A chair can be wonderful, but walls are what you see all the time," she says. "To me, walls that create a story or a mood are the starting point. " As a muralist, Soubiran is accustomed to using walls as a blank canvas. But she recently began experimenting with decorating techniques, creating a line of high-end wallpapers called Princes & Crows. Inspired by her memories of her native France, those designs have helped to transform a ramshackle 1923 duplex in Los Feliz into the charming home she shares with husband Joe Mauceri, a film and TV director and writer, and their 61/2-month-old daughter, Monica Moonshine.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2010 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
At the Parlour Room, the new bar from the Hollywood night-life royal Craig Trager, a guest is first and foremost overwhelmed by the wallpaper. Ordinarily, this wouldn't bode well for a bar — what with all the pretty girls, strapping lads and pillars of booze that should be claiming your attention instead. But, my, this wallpaper. If Marie Antoinette (the Kirsten Dunst version) were to dictate a new Versailles inside the Polo Lounge, she would cover the place in this stuff.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
When we first reported on the Fuoco wallpaper back in 2010, we noted that the design by the New York firm Trove essentially wrapped a room in history, a frozen-in-time moment inside Teatro La Fenice of Venice, Italy. Destroyed by fire in 1836, the opera house -- pictured here after the reconstruction -- burned to the ground again in 1996. The visual drama of the space, however, lives on a bit longer thanks to Anthropologie. The store has announced that its website will sell Trove's design as pre-pasted wallpaper "for easy consumer application.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Dutch designer Inke Heiland may be best known for playful animal-silhouette wall decor for kids, but her new line of whimsical pendant lamps will charm more than a few parents.   The new Inke pendant lights are made from the same floral vintage wallpapers as the popular assemble-it-yourself animal and tree silhouettes. The lamps are about $115 and come ready to install, complete with fitting, ceiling cap and a woven electrical cord in several color combinations. Because they are made from vintage wallpaper, they are limited editions with irregularities that add to their charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist, Los Angeles Times
Few set designers begin production with the intention of creating a deliberately gaudy and tacky stage. However, Thomas Buderwitz, scenic designer for South Coast Repertory's "The Prince of Atlantis," sought to do just that — to "push the boundaries of good taste. " The just-opened play by Steven Drukman follows Joey Colletti (John Kapelos), one of Boston's biggest seafood importers, as he lands himself in a minimum-security prison after getting into trouble with his company.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Cristy Lytal, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For some, staring at wallpaper is as much fun as watching paint dry, but not for designer Tony Roche, who created a handmade silver leaf wallpaper on display in the 1960s-set mutant superhero saga "X-Men: First Class. " "I have to say, sometimes when you mention to people wallpaper, they glaze over slightly," he said. "It's a bit like saying you're interested in spotting trains. But it surprises me how beautiful wallpaper is, when a lot of people think of it as being rather domestic and boring.
HOME & GARDEN
January 1, 2011 | By Emily Young, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Alix Soubiran could live quite happily without a stick of furniture. "A chair can be wonderful, but walls are what you see all the time," she says. "To me, walls that create a story or a mood are the starting point. " As a muralist, Soubiran is accustomed to using walls as a blank canvas. But she recently began experimenting with decorating techniques, creating a line of high-end wallpapers called Princes & Crows. Inspired by her memories of her native France, those designs have helped to transform a ramshackle 1923 duplex in Los Feliz into the charming home she shares with husband Joe Mauceri, a film and TV director and writer, and their 61/2-month-old daughter, Monica Moonshine.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2010 | By Lew Sichelman
Talk about thorough. When now semi-retired Chicago-area agent Hank Roeters was showing a house some years back to potential home buyers, the couple climbed into the bathtub together to make sure it fit two. Most would-be home buyers aren't nearly as detailed, even in today's buyer's market when they have plenty of time to make informed decisions. In fact, real estate agents think buyers are not exhaustive enough. According to realty agents, folks tend to pay far too much mind to the wallpaper, paint colors, carpet, greasy appliances and even the seller's furniture, and not nearly enough attention to water stains in the basement, corroded electric boxes, windows that refuse to open, rotted floor joists and cracks in the foundation.
HOME & GARDEN
January 29, 1994 | KATHY BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Ashley Williams turned 21, it seemed time her bedroom grew up too. "The room had white wallpaper with flowers, white wicker furniture and white shelves holding my doll and music box collections," she said. "I was tired of it." Williams, a student at Saddleback College, packed the collections away in the garage of the Laguna Niguel home where she lives with her parents and set out on a quest for a new, adult look. For help she turned to artist/designer Mary Divel, who is also a family friend.
MAGAZINE
October 26, 1986 | VIRGINIA GRAY, Virginia Gray is an associate editor of Los Angeles Times Magazine.
1. Wallpaper and matching border with the look of marble and tile from Imperial Wallcoverings' City Graphics and Country Plaids collection. (Wall coverings and fabrics shown are available at better paint and wallpaper dealers.) 2. "Stone" wall sconce from Design Express, Los Angeles. 3. Sculptural chair sheathed in "granite" laminate, Design Express. 4. Classic mirror with frame finished in granite-look lacquer, Bullock's. 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2010 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
At the Parlour Room, the new bar from the Hollywood night-life royal Craig Trager, a guest is first and foremost overwhelmed by the wallpaper. Ordinarily, this wouldn't bode well for a bar — what with all the pretty girls, strapping lads and pillars of booze that should be claiming your attention instead. But, my, this wallpaper. If Marie Antoinette (the Kirsten Dunst version) were to dictate a new Versailles inside the Polo Lounge, she would cover the place in this stuff.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2010 | By Scott Marshutz
After spending 20 years of decorating huge multimillion-dollar homes, interior designer Ann Fraser decided it was time to apply her design expertise to her own home. She tore down a 1950s single-level home in the Newport Heights area of Newport Beach and in its place built a two-story that looks like a centuries-old plantation-style estate. Features that give it an aged look are numerous. Iron railings enclose an expansive balcony where Mexican pavers were installed upside down to make them look older.
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