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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Ever since Walt Disney began turning out feature-length animated films, scholars, theologians and journalists have plumbed the depths of the simple morality tales for deeper religious meanings and messages. Was Snow White's eating of the poison apple an allusion to the Fall in the Garden of Eden? When the puppet maker Geppetto was swallowed by a whale, was that a veiled reference to Jonah in Hebrew Scriptures? Were Jiminy Cricket's initials in "Pinocchio" a hidden reference to Jesus Christ?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everyone knows Mickey Rooney, but who really remembers the extent of his success? How many now living can testify not only to how large this man loomed over the American film landscape but also to the particular qualities that made him such an enormous success in his prime? Everyone knows Rooney, who died Sunday in Los Angeles at the great age of 93, precisely because he lived so long, the tireless last surviving star of Hollywood's 1930s Golden Age, a performer always ready to make an appearance when there was a crowd waiting to applaud.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co.'s planned Grand Central Creative Campus in Glendale will eventually employ 10,000 workers and include 3.6 million square feet of offices, sound stages and studio production facilities, according to interviews and documents filed with the city of Glendale. In announcing the development in September, Walt Disney Imagineering executives declined to disclose the project size, the number of employees or the dollar value.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Michael Milosh and Robin Hannibal of Rhye are believers in mystery at a moment of enforced accessibility. Last year, the L.A.-based pop-soul duo worked to create an air of uncertainty around its exquisite debut album, “Woman,” on which Milosh sings in a breathy, high-pitched croon that many took to be female; Rhye's infrequent concerts and photo shoots -- and its relatively low profile on social media -- allowed that fantasy to flourish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993
When I was a young teen-ager living in a home for boys, I didn't have a father, even though my father was alive. I didn't have anyone to encourage or inspire me. Until that day the man in the Nash Metropolitan wearing an Eisenhower jacket arrived to pick up me and my friend, Mike Howard, to spend the weekend at his home. The man was Walt Disney. I credit Walt Disney with helping me overcome the hatred I developed for my father. Mr. Disney told me I had to forgive my father. He said, "Hatred will destroy you."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Neal Gabler
Even before it opens later this week, Disney's new animated feature, "The Princess and the Frog," is already considered something of a cultural and animation landmark. After centering cartoons on a Middle Easterner ("Aladdin"), a Native American (" Pocahontas"), an Asian ("Mulan"), and a Hawaiian ("Lilo & Stitch"), Disney animation has entered the post-racial era. The new film features a black protagonist alongside the green one. It has been a long time coming, but it is an event that, if you believe Disney detractors, would have old Walt spinning in his grave (or his cryogenic chamber)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
MADRID - Walt Disney was hardly a perfect American. He may have been the most famous and beloved American during his lifetime. But his private magic kingdom was not always the happiest place on Earth. Disney had his own private torments and is reputed to have railed against unions, blacks and Jews. At least that is part of the 21st century Disney legend, and it is necessarily part of Philip Glass' new opera, "The Perfect American. " Far from sterilized yet also disarmingly affectionate, it looks at Disney the myth, the artist and the man. The work contrasts between the America that formed Walt Disney and the America he formed for the rest of us. And that is what makes Disney a perfect American opera character, even if it took Spain to bring Glass' "The Perfect American" to the lyric stage.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Marvel's comic book superheroes "The Avengers" proved up to the task of vanquishing not only a malevolent demigod — but also the ghost of "John Carter. " The blockbuster summer movie, which has garnered nearly $1.5 billion in worldwide box-office receipts so far, helped Walt Disney Co. post a better-than-expected 24% increase in quarterly earnings. Buoyed by "The Avengers" and improvements at its theme parks and consumer products groups, the Burbank company reported a profit of $1.83 billion, or $1.01 a share, for its fiscal third quarter, which ended June 30, compared with $1.48 billion, or 77 cents a share, a year earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Meryl Streep is right. At some point in his storied career, Walt Disney belonged to an anti-Semitic group and surely was sexist -- or a "gender bigot," as she put it Tuesday when she presented a National Board of Review award to Emma Thompson for her work as the novelist P.L. Travers in the movie “Saving Mr. Banks.” (Thompson played opposite Tom Hanks' Disney, the creative visionary who desperately wanted to turn Travers' complicated heroine...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
As the respective creators of Mickey Mouse and Mary Poppins, two of the most cheerful, beloved characters around, it's odd to imagine studio head Walt Disney and author P.L. Travers quarreling. But that's precisely what happened when Disney tried to persuade Travers to allow her children's books to be made into a musical film. Their creative dispute is dramatized in the new film "Saving Mr. Banks," starring Tom Hanks as Disney and Emma Thompson as Travers. Speaking at the  Envelope Screening Series , Hanks and Thompson discussed their characters' fractious relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By James C. Taylor
NEW YORK - Pianist Evgeny Kissin speaks many languages, but to audiences around the world he is best known - and in some circles, revered - for his ability to articulate, with precision, the greatest scores of the classical piano repertoire. Talking with the Russian-born artist on New York's Upper West Side a few days before a sold-out solo recital at Carnegie Hall (the program of Scriabin and Schubert will repeat at Disney Hall on Monday), it becomes immediately clear that Kissin's mind is hard-wired for accuracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Noel Murray
Frozen Disney/Buena Vista, $29.99; Blu-ray, $44.99 Available on VOD beginning March 18 Disney's clever, heartwarming Rapunzel riff "Tangled" was a surprise smash back in 2010, setting the stage for last year's billon-dollar-grossing, multi-Oscar-winning Snow Queen revamp "Frozen," and - if all goes well - a renewed emphasis on animation at the studio synonymous with the medium. At the least, between the grosses and the accolades, it's pretty clear that "Frozen" will have lasting impact on the generation of children who are going to grow up watching it over and over, while belting out the hit song "Let It Go" into their bedroom mirrors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Master of the viol, Jordi Savall is also a master joiner. His specialty is a narrow-seeming one, his six-stringed instrument's heyday having been the 16th and early 17th centuries when the viol was second in popularity only to the lute. Viol repertory is fertile, to be sure, but limited in historical scope and relevance (the Renaissance and Baroque eras), in sound (it is a quiet instrument), in tone (it has a dark, subdued character) and in geography (Western Europe). Yet Savall, who is Catalan and who founded and conducts the outstanding period-instrument ensemble Hespèrion XXI that will be appearing Sunday in Walt Disney Concert Hall, has what could be the broadest vision among any musicians today of how cultures connect and the historical significance of that for a modern, changing world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Walt Disney Co. is giving 10 startup companies the chance at $120,000 to develop their ideas and receive mentoring from top company executives. The three-month mentorship and seed-stage investment program, called Disney Accelerator, begins June 30, and will give participants access to various company resources, including iconic Disney characters and stories. Disney Accelerator will end in September with Investor Demo Day, when the 10 teams will present their ideas to prospective investors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Philippe Jaroussky is one suave countertenor. Were there an early music Rat Pack, he could lead it. Appearing with the Venice Baroque Orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Wednesday, Jaroussky, who turns 36 next week, looked the part of a Handelian Harry Connick Jr. Stylishly tuxedo-ed as if for a Las Vegas stage show of a time when class still mattered, his presence was smooth as silk. His voice is sweet as honey yet far more fluid. He left little wonder why he has become an unusually big star (for a countertenor, anyway)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Susan King
Animator Floyd Norman vividly recalled the first time he encountered Walt Disney. In early 1956, Norman was one of a few young animators hired for a one-month tryout at the Disney studio in Burbank. A few weeks into its training, the group was told to report to a screening room on the third floor of the Animation Building. Because the room was occupied, they had to wait in the hallway. "We saw this figure step out into the hallway moving toward us," Norman said. "As the figure moved closer, we suddenly realized - oh, my God - it was Walt Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
One of the modern icons of moviedom called out one of Hollywood's historic heroes Tuesday, as Meryl Streep delivered a sharp rebuke to Walt Disney for alleged sexist and anti-Semitic views at the National Board of Review awards gala in New York. Streep was on hand to present an acting award to Emma Thompson for her portrayal of the prickly British author and "Mary Poppins" creator P.L. Travers in the new film "Saving Mr. Banks," which dramatizes Disney's efforts to persuade Travers to adapt her books into a musical.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2001 | Richard Verrier
The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences honored Walt Disney, founder of the Disney empire, on what would have been his 100th birthday. Hollywood paid tribute to the pioneering animator in a two-hour event that included rare movie clips, home movies and discussions with family members and associates about his life.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Laura E. Davis
In 1964, Jong Sook Kim visited Disneyland. It was no ordinary trip for the 14-year-old. Doctors once thought she would never see again, but after she traveled from her native South Korea to San Francisco for surgery, her sight was restored -- and she got a personal invitation from Walt Disney to visit the happiest place on earth. A moment from that day, of Kim with "Alice in Wonderland" characters the Mad Hatter, Alice and the White Rabbit, that was taken for the Los Angeles Times' article about her, is captured in one of our vintage Disneyland photos above.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Meryl Streep is right. At some point in his storied career, Walt Disney belonged to an anti-Semitic group and surely was sexist -- or a "gender bigot," as she put it Tuesday when she presented a National Board of Review award to Emma Thompson for her work as the novelist P.L. Travers in the movie “Saving Mr. Banks.” (Thompson played opposite Tom Hanks' Disney, the creative visionary who desperately wanted to turn Travers' complicated heroine...
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