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Walt Disney Pictures

ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New York Film Festival will screen the first work-in-progress in its 29-year-history when it presents Disney's unfinished "Beauty and the Beast" during this year's festival. While not the first animated feature ever shown at the festival--Warner Bros.' 1979 "The Road Runner Movie" holds that distinction--"Beauty and the Beast" is the first animated Disney film to be included on the festival program. "Beauty and the Beast," slated for release Nov.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1991 | DAVID WALLACE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Summer movies and comic book heroes--it's a pairing that brought you "Batman" in 1989, "Dick Tracy" in 1990 and this summer, "The Rocketeer." The who? Good question.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The movie studio that ranked at the bottom of two consecutive surveys on job opportunities for minority writers is now pursuing one of the most aggressive minority hiring programs that Hollywood has ever seen. Walt Disney Studios said it soon will announce the names of 27 writers--all of whom are African American, Latino, Asian American or women--who have been selected for a new writing fellowship program. The writers will be assigned to work with the studio's creative teams.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1990 | From United Press International
Walt Disney Pictures Accused of Age Bias: A suit filed Wednesday by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accuses Walt Disney Pictures of discriminating against a 58-year-old executive assistant because of her age. The U.S. District Court suit, filed in Los Angeles, alleges that Sheila Barnes was discharged when a new, 36-year-old vice president of motion picture production told her she was being replaced because of a "generation gap" that existed between them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Buoyed by the success of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," "Oliver and Company," "The Land Before Time" and "The Little Mermaid," animation is enjoying a banner year: * "The Little Mermaid," which earned a record-breaking $82 million, won two Academy Awards--the first animated feature to receive an Oscar since "Dumbo" in 1942. * At least five new animated features are scheduled to be released this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1990 | STACY JENEL SMITH
It's not just the kids who are being targeted by movie merchandise tie-ins during this summer's blitz of big-budgeted films. Adults are going to have their share of the gimmickry too. It's all part of the summer movie sweepstakes, as studios look for more ways to bring attention--and audiences--to their films. As the year's busiest moviegoing season, summer accounts for 40% of the year's total grosses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The brouhaha over the motion-picture academy's alleged snubbing of Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" and Michael Moore's "Roger & Me" has overshadowed the Oscar exclusion of the most widely seen animated film of 1989, Walt Disney Pictures' "Tummy Trouble." The first Roger Rabbit cartoon and the first short cartoon Disney had released in 25 years didn't receive a nomination in the animated-short category.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
At a USC screening of "The Little Mermaid" the other night, a young woman asked the co-authors and co-directors, in a tone that could be characterized as civilly indignant, whether a woman had been consulted in the creation of the script. Was what she called the "Some-Day-My-Prince-Will-Come" Syndrome (in which the answer to any mermaid's prayer is simply to find a good man) their work solely or a coeducational enterprise?
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