Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWalt Disney World
IN THE NEWS

Walt Disney World

NEWS
July 28, 1994 | Associated Press
Lightning struck a tram unloading passengers at Walt Disney World's Magic Kingdom on Wednesday, slightly injuring four people. No one was hit directly by the lightning bolt that struck in the "Happy" parking lot near the ticket and transportation center. Seven people were stunned by the strike but three did not require treatment. Four people were treated at a hospital and released.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
April 30, 2000 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walt Disney World has disbanded its marching band, a Magic Kingdom fixture for nearly 30 years. The band's 18 musicians, dressed in signature red coats, white pants and plumed hats, were abruptly fired last week. They will be replaced by smaller musical groups throughout the park. A spokeswoman said Disney wanted "something fresh," adding that "it seemed to be time to make a change." Disney's original band still performs at Disneyland.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
If you're going to Walt Disney World in Florida this summer or fall, why not stay near the town Disney built? The Radisson Resort Orlando-Celebration in Kissimmee is half a mile from the amusement park and across the street from the Celebration community built by Disney in the 1990s. Rooms for a family of four are as low as $89 a night, and that comes with shuttle service to Walt Disney World. The deal: This hotel rate doesn't come with tickets (other hotel packages do) but provides a low-cost room for families traveling to Walt Disney World.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
In need of a job in 1944, Santa Monica High School graduate Joyce Carlson followed a friend to Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, where she landed work in the traffic department delivering mail, and office and art supplies. But what started out as just a job turned into a career for Carlson, who spent the next 56 years involved first with Disney animated movies and then theme park attractions worldwide.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1997 | DARYL STRICKLAND, Daryl Strickland covers tourism and small and minority business issues for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5670 and at daryl.strickland@latimes.com
Mickey Mouse Jr. has outdistanced the original Mickey. Disneyland, the Anaheim theme park, has slipped from its perch as the continent's most popular theme park, surpassed by The Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World in Florida. An estimated 17 million people visited the Magic Kingdom, up 23%, versus 14.2 million at Disneyland, down 5%, or about 700,000 people, according to Amusement Business, a Nashville-based trade journal. Disneyland's attendance declined for a couple of reasons.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | Reuters
A 6-year-old girl was critically injured in an accident at a ride in Walt Disney World, officials said Friday. Barbara Paribanez of Miami was in critical but stable condition at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and Women in Orlando. She suffered a broken rib, broken right arm and collapsed lung, a hospital spokeswoman said. She accidentally fell out of a boat at the "It's A Small World" ride Thursday, Disney spokeswoman Michelle Fisher said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998
Marvin A. Davis, 87, Emmy-winning art director and theme park planner for Disney. After several years as an art director for 20th Century Fox, Davis joined Walt Disney Imagineering in 1953. He became the master planner for Disneyland, which opened in 1955, and was particularly responsible for the design of the park's Main Street, Sleeping Beauty Castle and Haunted Mansion. Davis also served as project designer for the concept of Walt Disney World, which opened in 1973 in Florida.
NEWS
October 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
Walt Disney World has quietly started requiring background checks on all new hires, following the rape of a tourist and the publication of a book critical of the theme park's security practices. The resort already ran checks on new employees who handled money, worked directly with children, were involved with security or disclosed they were convicted of a crime, spokesman Bill Warren said. It decided in August to expand the checks to all new hires, just like Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2004 | From Associated Press
Union officials representing 40% of Walt Disney World's 52,000-person workforce asked a federal mediator to help them reach a contract with the company after a third proposal was rejected by members, who also authorized a strike, if necessary. The mediator planned to meet Monday in Orlando with Disney executives and leaders of the unions. The unions' members Thursday rejected the contract proposal by a vote of 3,686 to 2,827.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|