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War Crimes

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WORLD
July 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. House passed a nonbinding resolution urging Japan to apologize for coercing thousands of women into working as sex slaves for its World War II military. Officials in Tokyo say their country's leaders have apologized repeatedly, but the resolution's supporters say Japan has never fully assumed responsibility. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe caused anger in March when he said there was no evidence that the women had been coerced. Lawmakers want an apology similar to the one the U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
It's too easy to start with the face or what she wears, how she sits. The color of her earrings. The essence is in the vowels, the way she holds and releases them. The voice drops a register, as if in a conspiracy, and a morning conversation drifts across art, ambition, age and riding camels in the desert. Many roles come to mind when Nicole Kidman speaks: inconsolable mother, suicidal writer, dangerous weather girl, nuclear scientist, gangster lover, top-hatted cabaret singer and Southern femme fatale with an earthy remedy for jellyfish stings.
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WORLD
June 5, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
He's everything his country wants to be: confident, successful, comfortable in his own skin and able, at last, to put a violent past behind him. It's not often that a tennis star embodies the hopes of an entire nation. But in Novak Djokovic — the world's No. 2 men's player, whose perfect win streak this year was finally snapped here Friday at the French Open — Serbia has found what it thinks is the perfect pitchman for a rebranding campaign, someone who'll bring back the shine to its tarnished reputation.
WORLD
March 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The International Criminal Court on Friday handed down the second conviction in its 12-year history, finding former Congolese warlord Germain Katanga guilty on four counts of war crimes and one count of crimes against humanity. Katanga, a leader of the Patriotic Resistance Force in Ituri, one of the myriad armed militias in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, was found guilty of being an accomplice to murders and pillage during a 2003 attack on the village of Bogoro.
OPINION
January 24, 2014 | By Colleen Graffy
We don't know their names but we know their numbers, and we can see the evidence of their torture, thanks to a former crime-scene photographer who says he became a reluctant documenter of murder "on an industrial scale" committed by Bashar Assad's regime in Syria. The photographer, code-named Caesar to protect his identity after his defection from Syria, says he worked in the military police for 13 years documenting crime scenes and accidents. But after the civil war began, Caesar says, Assad's government put his skill-set to a different use: photographing the bodies of detainees who had been killed by the regime.
WORLD
March 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Standing before the International Criminal Court on Tuesday for the first time, Congolese warlord Bosco Ntaganda denied he was guilty of a long list of wartime crimes. Ntaganda faces charges of forcing children to fight as soldiers and indirectly perpetrating murder, rape, attacks on civilians and other crimes against humanity. He was officially informed of the charges against him at the hearing Tuesday in the Hague. The warlord said he was not guilty before a judge interrupted and told him he did not yet need to enter a plea.
WORLD
August 12, 2013 | By Jeevan Vasagar
BERLIN -- A Hungarian war crimes suspect who allegedly brutalized and deported thousands of Jewish prisoners to the infamous Nazi death camp of Auschwitz during World War II has died of pneumonia, his lawyer said Monday. Laszlo Csatary, 98, who died in a hospital in Budapest on Saturday, was charged with war crimes by Hungarian prosecutors in June. He denied allegations that he was involved in torture and deportation while serving as a police commander in the town of Kosice in 1944.
WORLD
November 16, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams
The Yugoslav war crimes tribunal on Friday overturned the convictions of two Croatian generals who led a 1995 assault against Serb-occupied territory, ruling that the trial court erred in judging the officers' action as an attack on civilians. Gens. Ante Gotovina and Mladen Markac showed little emotion when the presiding judge of the appeals panel at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia read out the 3-2 decision to reverse their convictions for crimes against humanity and violations of the law of war. Crowds of supporters inside and outside the courtroom, however, erupted with cheers and applause.
WORLD
December 18, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
A rebel leader accused of leading a brutal attack on a Congolese village nearly a decade ago was acquitted Tuesday by the International Criminal Court, which said prosecutors failed to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Mathieu Ngudjolo was responsible for the mass rapes and murders that devastated the town. The decision was widely seen as a setback for war crimes prosecutors who already face steep obstacles in persuading witnesses to come forward and testify. It is the second verdict ever handed down by the court, which earlier convicted former warlord Thomas Lubanga of using child soldiers in the same Congolese conflict.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI -- The death Thursday of one of the last senior leaders of Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime before his trial concluded underscores flaws in the war-crimes tribunal process that threaten to undermine the pursuit of global justice, according to lawyers, human rights activists and victims. Ieng Sary, 87, who died after a battle with heart disease and high blood pressure, was co-founder and foreign minister of the Khmer Rouge. An estimated 1.7 million Cambodians, one quarter of the nation's population at the time, died of disease, starvation, forced labor and execution during its 1975-79 reign.
OPINION
February 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
For some children in Syria, the civil war is a particular kind of hell. The details of a United Nations report released last week are chilling and gut-wrenching, and go far beyond the kind of civilian slaughter that accompanies shelling of residential neighborhoods - a reproachable hallmark of the fighting in that country. Despite encountering significant hurdles in reaching witnesses, U.N. investigators documented cases in which children as young as 11 were subjected to sexual attacks, their fingernails being pulled, electric shocks to genitalia and beatings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
Only one Academy Award nominee in the live-action short film category truly merits the win. Following a battered woman and her children's escape from her abuser, "Just Before Losing Everything" ticks for half an hour as if it could explode at any moment. Actor Xavier Legrand's directorial debut draws on a conceivable scenario and booby-traps it with entirely plausible hurdles. Glimpses of the woman's bruises and a little one's screaming substantiate the high stakes. Claw your armrests.
OPINION
January 24, 2014 | By Colleen Graffy
We don't know their names but we know their numbers, and we can see the evidence of their torture, thanks to a former crime-scene photographer who says he became a reluctant documenter of murder "on an industrial scale" committed by Bashar Assad's regime in Syria. The photographer, code-named Caesar to protect his identity after his defection from Syria, says he worked in the military police for 13 years documenting crime scenes and accidents. But after the civil war began, Caesar says, Assad's government put his skill-set to a different use: photographing the bodies of detainees who had been killed by the regime.
WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Raja Abdulrahim
With peace talks due to begin this week in Switzerland, a report lays out new evidence that the Syrian government engaged in the “systematic torture and killing” of detainees that it says could support charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. A team of legal and forensics experts, including three lawyers with experience prosecuting war crimes in Sierra Leone and the former Yugoslavia, was asked by a London law firm acting on behalf of Qatar to review about 55,000 images said to show bodies of people who died in Syrian custody.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- Five people were killed Monday in Bangladesh as police and protesters clashed anew over the execution of a senior opposition leader. The deaths reportedly happened overnight in southeastern district of Satkhira. Police said demonstrators from the Jamaat-e-Islami party, some wielding homemade bombs, attacked security officials. The clash was the latest violence since Abdul Quader Molla, a top figure in the opposition party, was hanged last week for crimes against humanity dating back to the country's 1971 war of independence from Pakistan.
WORLD
December 2, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
Syrian President Bashar Assad is implicated in war crimes and crimes against humanity in the country's ongoing civil war, the United Nations' human rights chief said Monday. A U.N. panel of experts, which has been investigating abuses in Syria, has gathered a "massive" amount of evidence indicating such crimes were committed, said Navi Pillay, the U.N. high commissioner for human rights. "The evidence indicates responsibility at the highest level of government, including the head of state," Pillay said at a news conference in Geneva.
OPINION
June 13, 1999
War: the system whereby victors rewrite history and losers are labeled war criminals. LOUIS ST. MARTIN, Pomona
WORLD
March 5, 2009 | Edmund Sanders
In a challenge to one of Africa's most defiant strongmen, the International Criminal Court on Wednesday issued an arrest warrant for Sudan's president on charges of war crimes in Darfur, a quest for justice that immediately complicated relief efforts for hundreds of thousands of people and raised the specter of more violence.
OPINION
October 10, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Even before his on-again, off-again threat to punish the government of Syria for the use of chemical weapons, President Obama was criticized for what many saw as a halting and incoherent policy toward the civil war in that country. Advocates of muscular U.S. intervention noted that Obama had said it was time for President Bashar Assad to step aside, but he had declined to weaken Assad's position either by establishing a no-fly zone or by providing opposition forces with significant military hardware.
WORLD
October 1, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- A special Bangladeshi court sentenced a top opposition politician to hang Tuesday after he was found guilty on charges of murder, arson and crimes against humanity linked to the country's 1971 war of independence against Pakistan. The ruling prompted police and paramilitary forces to step up security across the country. The 172-page verdict against Salauddin Quader Chowdhury of the main opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party is the sixth death sentence handed down against Islamist opposition leaders by a special war crimes tribunal.
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