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War Crimes Cambodia

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NEWS
February 19, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yes, of course, Saroeun Kim said, the Khmer Rouge leaders should be brought to trial. Among the more than 1 million Cambodians they killed were his mother and father, his brothers, most of his aunts, uncles and cousins. "I don't want revenge, but I can never forgive or forget," said Kim, 29, who tends bar in Phnom Penh, the capital, and studies computer science. "I remember the day two men came to get my mother, and I remember seeing her body in a pile of corpses.
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NEWS
March 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An international tribunal, and not a Cambodian court, should handle the prosecution of the leaders of the Khmer Rouge, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said. In an apparent attempt to win the approval for a U.N. court from Cambodia's leader, Hun Sen, he added that a Cambodian war crimes tribunal would not have to be modeled on existing ones, and other options could be explored.
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NEWS
March 13, 1999 | Associated Press
Cambodia's Prince Norodom Ranariddh called Friday for international help in his country's trial of a captured Khmer Rouge army chief. A Cambodian court will try Ta Mok, despite calls for an international tribunal made by U.N. officials and human rights groups, which say local courts are too influenced by the government for a thorough trial. Prime Minister Hun Sen has ruled out an international tribunal, saying that the U.N.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | Associated Press
Cambodia's Prince Norodom Ranariddh called Friday for international help in his country's trial of a captured Khmer Rouge army chief. A Cambodian court will try Ta Mok, despite calls for an international tribunal made by U.N. officials and human rights groups, which say local courts are too influenced by the government for a thorough trial. Prime Minister Hun Sen has ruled out an international tribunal, saying that the U.N.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
The United States wants China to help arrange a war crimes trial for Pol Pot, who led Cambodia's Khmer Rouge guerrilla group when it killed perhaps a million people, a senior U.S. diplomat said Friday. Undersecretary of State Thomas R. Pickering said Chinese officials "listened with interest" but did not immediately respond to the request raised in meetings since his arrival Thursday in Beijing.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-stalled negotiations aimed at ending Cambodia's civil war opened under an ominous cloud Sunday, with the Phnom Penh government presenting the three-faction opposition coalition with a call for a war crimes tribunal that threatened to derail the talks from the outset. The target of the call is one of the three factions in the opposition, the Communist Khmer Rouge, accused of "genocide" while it held power in Cambodia.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a low-rent office full of computers and file cabinets, a group of young volunteers is doing the job no one in this nation wanted to touch--cataloging a genocide. It is a high-risk undertaking, conducted in partnership with Yale University Law School, because there are people in Cambodia, including some senior members of government, who have a lot to lose if they are linked to the Khmer Rouge's mass killings of 1975-79.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An international tribunal, and not a Cambodian court, should handle the prosecution of the leaders of the Khmer Rouge, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said. In an apparent attempt to win the approval for a U.N. court from Cambodia's leader, Hun Sen, he added that a Cambodian war crimes tribunal would not have to be modeled on existing ones, and other options could be explored.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge leader who presided over Cambodia's "killing fields" in the late 1970s, is dying--without acknowledging remorse or responsibility for his reign of terror. His own former followers, holding him under guard in a jungle camp in Anlong Veng, Cambodia, forced him to talk to American reporter Nate Thayer last Thursday.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The last senior leader of the Khmer Rouge guerrilla army was arrested Saturday and flown to Phnom Penh, where authorities said he will be tried for his alleged role in a regime that killed more than 1 million people. Soldiers captured Ta Mok, known as "the Butcher" for his ruthlessness, near the northern border with Thailand, senior Cambodian generals said.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The last senior leader of the Khmer Rouge guerrilla army was arrested Saturday and flown to Phnom Penh, where authorities said he will be tried for his alleged role in a regime that killed more than 1 million people. Soldiers captured Ta Mok, known as "the Butcher" for his ruthlessness, near the northern border with Thailand, senior Cambodian generals said.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yes, of course, Saroeun Kim said, the Khmer Rouge leaders should be brought to trial. Among the more than 1 million Cambodians they killed were his mother and father, his brothers, most of his aunts, uncles and cousins. "I don't want revenge, but I can never forgive or forget," said Kim, 29, who tends bar in Phnom Penh, the capital, and studies computer science. "I remember the day two men came to get my mother, and I remember seeing her body in a pile of corpses.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a low-rent office full of computers and file cabinets, a group of young volunteers is doing the job no one in this nation wanted to touch--cataloging a genocide. It is a high-risk undertaking, conducted in partnership with Yale University Law School, because there are people in Cambodia, including some senior members of government, who have a lot to lose if they are linked to the Khmer Rouge's mass killings of 1975-79.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
The United States wants China to help arrange a war crimes trial for Pol Pot, who led Cambodia's Khmer Rouge guerrilla group when it killed perhaps a million people, a senior U.S. diplomat said Friday. Undersecretary of State Thomas R. Pickering said Chinese officials "listened with interest" but did not immediately respond to the request raised in meetings since his arrival Thursday in Beijing.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This," said Pen Phalla, standing in a schoolyard where the grass was neatly clipped and songbirds darted among tall palms, "is where they killed the intelligentsia. You know--teachers, doctors, the educated, people like that. "Sometimes they beat them to death with shovels and hoes to save bullets. Or cut their throats. It just depended." She stepped into a classroom that had been partitioned into cells. "That's blood on the floor," she said. "The bed's original.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge leader who presided over Cambodia's "killing fields" in the late 1970s, is dying--without acknowledging remorse or responsibility for his reign of terror. His own former followers, holding him under guard in a jungle camp in Anlong Veng, Cambodia, forced him to talk to American reporter Nate Thayer last Thursday.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This," said Pen Phalla, standing in a schoolyard where the grass was neatly clipped and songbirds darted among tall palms, "is where they killed the intelligentsia. You know--teachers, doctors, the educated, people like that. "Sometimes they beat them to death with shovels and hoes to save bullets. Or cut their throats. It just depended." She stepped into a classroom that had been partitioned into cells. "That's blood on the floor," she said. "The bed's original.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Khmer Rouge guerrillas said that if they hand over longtime leader Pol Pot for trial before an international tribunal, the nation's current leader should be tried as well. In a broadcast on clandestine Khmer Rouge radio, the guerrillas said they had no objections to surrendering Pol Pot for prosecution for alleged genocide during the Khmer Rouge's bloody regime.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Khmer Rouge guerrillas said that if they hand over longtime leader Pol Pot for trial before an international tribunal, the nation's current leader should be tried as well. In a broadcast on clandestine Khmer Rouge radio, the guerrillas said they had no objections to surrendering Pol Pot for prosecution for alleged genocide during the Khmer Rouge's bloody regime.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-stalled negotiations aimed at ending Cambodia's civil war opened under an ominous cloud Sunday, with the Phnom Penh government presenting the three-faction opposition coalition with a call for a war crimes tribunal that threatened to derail the talks from the outset. The target of the call is one of the three factions in the opposition, the Communist Khmer Rouge, accused of "genocide" while it held power in Cambodia.
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