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War Crimes Trials

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NEWS
August 2, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All 23 American prisoners of war captured by Iraqi forces during Operation Desert Storm, including two U.S. servicewomen, were tortured or abused by their captors, a top Defense Department official told U.S. lawmakers Thursday. In several instances, Iraqi interrogators broke bones, perforated eardrums and threatened to shoot or dismember the American prisoners in their custody, Army Col. Bill Jordan said in testimony before Congress' Human Rights Caucus.
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WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- Five people were killed Monday in Bangladesh as police and protesters clashed anew over the execution of a senior opposition leader. The deaths reportedly happened overnight in southeastern district of Satkhira. Police said demonstrators from the Jamaat-e-Islami party, some wielding homemade bombs, attacked security officials. The clash was the latest violence since Abdul Quader Molla, a top figure in the opposition party, was hanged last week for crimes against humanity dating back to the country's 1971 war of independence from Pakistan.
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NEWS
October 2, 1990 | Reuters
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher launched a public offensive against Iraq on Monday, saying Baghdad should pay war damages, Iraqi soldiers should stand trial for war crimes and there should be no negotiations about its occupation of Kuwait. In a series of U.S. television interviews, Thatcher outlined a tough, no-negotiations stand against Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, saying the West has the authority to oust Iraq militarily from Kuwait if it has to.
WORLD
April 19, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY - Contradictory court judgments in the war crimes trial of former Guatemalan dictator Gen. Efrain Rios Montt this week set off protests in Guatemala City and prompted rebukes from human rights organizations. On Friday, Judge Jazmin Barrios, who is presiding over Rios Montt's genocide trial in Guatemala's capital, called court to order despite a ruling by another judge a day earlier granting an appeal by the defense to annul the case based on a technicality. The Thursday ruling was “illegal,” Barrios said.
WORLD
June 12, 2002
A former Yugoslav soldier went on trial Tuesday on charges of killing two ethnic Albanians in Kosovo, in the first war crimes case to be tried in a Yugoslav court. Ivan Nikolic, 30, is charged with gunning down the two civilians in the village of Peduh in May 1999. The district court in Prokuplje, a Serbian town near Kosovo province, charged Nikolic with murder last year. This year, his indictment was changed to "war crimes against the civilian population."
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first international war crimes trial since the end of World War II began here Tuesday amid a sense of anticipation and history, but with troubling questions hanging in the air and a small-time Bosnian Serb political operator named Dusan Tadic as the lone defendant.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | Associated Press
Cambodia's foreign minister rejected Wednesday a U.N. plan for war crimes trials, and parliament voted to allow genocide trials to be delayed by up to three years. Foreign Minister Hor Nam Hong said a U.N. proposal that foreign judges hold a majority on a tribunal that would include Cambodian jurists threatened Cambodia's sovereignty.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Stacey C. Koon, police sergeant and defendant, stood unnoticed at the back of the room. This was Thursday, the first day of trial for the four Los Angeles cops accused of beating Rodney G. King beyond all reason, and Koon was waiting for his lawyer to finish an impromptu news conference and go to lunch. Koon wore a blue banker's suit and a thin, stiff smile. The smile receded when he realized he had been spotted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fredric T. Suss Sr., a lawyer who was lead prosecutor in the 1946 Japanese war crimes trials on Guam, died Jan. 26, a day before he would have turned 92, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at his home in Potomac, Md. His work in the war crimes trials resulted in the convictions of Lt. Gen. Yoshio Tachibana and other Japanese officers accused of cannibalism and other atrocities committed against American prisoners of war on the island of Chichi Jima in the South Pacific.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the face of increasingly lurid stories of Iraqi atrocities in Kuwait, the United States and its Arab allies are coming under increasing pressure to put Iraqi soldiers, as well as their leader, Saddam Hussein, on trial for war crimes, officials say. With tens of thousands of Iraqi troops already being held as prisoners of war, experts say they are sure that at least some of the soldiers went beyond the bounds of permissible military action.
WORLD
April 19, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Contradictory court judgments in the war crimes trial of former Guatemalan dictator Gen. Efrain Rios Montt this week set off protests in Guatemala City and prompted rebukes from human rights organizations around the world. On Friday, Judge Jazmin Barrios, who is presiding over Rios Montt's genocide trial in Guatemala's capital, called court to order despite another judge's ruling a day earlier granting an appeal by the defense to annul the case based on a technicality.
OPINION
December 16, 2012
Re "Bin Laden movie heats up CIA torture debate," Dec. 14 With the arrival of "Zero Dark Thirty," a dramatization of the hunt for Osama bin Laden, we seem to have reached the point where we are discussing the value of torture rather than its morality. We have moved from being a country that thrilled to James Cagney resisting Nazi torture to protect the secrets of D-day ("13 Rue Madeleine") to one that seemingly will embrace torture if it works. We were a country that condemned Hitler for the heinous invasion of Poland; just recently, we invaded Iraq on the pretext that we have a unilateral right to preemptive war. And those who promote these new values claim the mantle of being the real Americans.
WORLD
May 17, 2012 | By Janet Stobart and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
LONDON — Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic confronted the accusations against him at the opening of his war crimes trial in The Hague on Wednesday with contemptuous gestures to the court and the victims who had come to see him face justice for atrocities during the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Slowed by age and the hardships of 15 years on the run from the indictment by the United Nations tribunal, Mladic still mustered a hint of his trademark swagger as...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
To organize his research on the Watts riots, journalist Robert E. Conot sketched out the hour-by-hour progress of events in 1965 on a 25-foot-long stretch of paper, then dressed the diagram in the exhaustive detail for which he became known. The timeline helped him write "Rivers of Blood, Years of Darkness," a 1967 study of the smoldering unrest behind the riots. Based on his eyewitness account and extensive interviews, the book was called "brilliant" by Times reviewers. In 1969, one of them wrote: "With honesty and soul," he revealed the "real, ordinary" people of the "ghetto.
WORLD
August 6, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Supermodel Naomi Campbell traded the catwalk for the witness stand Thursday as she acknowledged accepting a gift of "dirty-looking stones" that war crimes prosecutors say were uncut diamonds from former Liberian strongman Charles Taylor. Prosecutors say the gems offer proof that Taylor engaged in the trade of illegally mined "conflict diamonds" to help arm rebels in neighboring Sierra Leone's decade-long civil war. Thousands of civilians were killed or mutilated during the fighting.
WORLD
December 6, 2009 | By Brendan Brady
The scene at the untidy conclusion of Cambodia's first war crimes trial was telling: a French defense lawyer with his face buried in his hands. The tribunal promised a more inclusive approach than its counterparts at the International Criminal Court at The Hague. Instead, the trial closed in disarray late last month after an eleventh-hour disagreement between the Cambodian and foreign defense counsels, offering a stark reminder of the difficulties in carrying out international standards of justice in a country with a reputation for corruption and a deeply compromised legal system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
To organize his research on the Watts riots, journalist Robert E. Conot sketched out the hour-by-hour progress of events in 1965 on a 25-foot-long stretch of paper, then dressed the diagram in the exhaustive detail for which he became known. The timeline helped him write "Rivers of Blood, Years of Darkness," a 1967 study of the smoldering unrest behind the riots. Based on his eyewitness account and extensive interviews, the book was called "brilliant" by Times reviewers. In 1969, one of them wrote: "With honesty and soul," he revealed the "real, ordinary" people of the "ghetto.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1991
Regarding the Soviet peace proposal: No reparations, Saddam wins. No war crimes trials, Saddam wins. Partial withdrawal of troops, Saddam wins. Iraq's military intact, Saddam wins. Linkage to Palestinian issue, Israel loses. JEFFREY LEVINE Los Angeles
WORLD
October 27, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
United Nations judges abruptly adjourned Radovan Karadzic's war crimes trial after the former Bosnian Serb leader boycotted the opening day to protest what he said was his lack of time to prepare a defense. Judge O-Gon Kwon said that in the absence of Karadzic, who was defending himself, or any lawyer representing him, he was suspending the case until this afternoon, when the prosecution would begin its opening statement. It was not immediately clear what would happen if Karadzic again boycotted the trial today.
WORLD
September 1, 2009 | Scott Kraft
They gather every day in a tiny former dry goods shop on a residential street here in this West African capital, and to the neighbors they are what they seem: seven women in front of sewing machines learning to make brightly colored dresses, dashikis and slippers. But the women share a secret. "It's a very long story," said one of them, Christiana John, a tired look on her face. "I don't like to remember most of the things that happened to me." Among the many victims of Sierra Leone's brutal, decade-long civil war are the "bush wives," the girls and women who were kidnapped, raped and forced to "marry" combatants and bear their children.
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