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War Criminals

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NEWS
February 16, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clad in fatigues and a beret, the Chechen commander laughs, kicks one prostrate Russian soldier, waves a pistol in the air, then steps up to a kneeling soldier and shoots him in the head. Salautdin Temirbulatov, 41, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison Thursday on evidence created by his own men: an April 1996 videotape of him executing the soldier, Sergei Mitryayev.
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WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Barbara Demick
SEOUL - As he hops around the Western Pacific this week, President Obama hopes to unite much of Asia around a free-trade deal, updated alliances and a new power balance. But he first must persuade two of America's closest allies to stop squabbling. Jetting from Tokyo to Seoul on Friday morning, his second stop on the trip, Obama was between two nations mired in an old feud. South Koreans are furious over what they perceive as inadequate remorse from Japan over its brutal colonization of their nation from 1910 to 1945 and its use of Korean "comfort women" as sex slaves during World War II. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Korean President Park Geun-hye have traded slights and diplomatic digs for months.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2009 | TINA DAUNT
Hollywood may be in a post-inaugural mood, but many of the industry's leading activists came back from Washington without a hangover. They're already moving into full swing on a number of nonpartisan human rights issues as varied as hunger in America and the ongoing war in Iraq. Celebs will have a chance to add another cause to their rosters: the prosecution of Balkan war criminals.
WORLD
October 14, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME - Italy is debating what to do with the body of Erich Priebke, the unrepentant Nazi war criminal who died in Rome last week at the age of 100. Denied a church funeral in Rome by the Vatican, the former SS captain, who received a life sentence for his role in a 1944 massacre of 335 Italians, has also been refused burial in Rome, as well as in his adopted home country of Argentina and in his hometown in Germany. Protesting the decisions, his lawyer Paolo Giachini has said he would consider holding the funeral “in the street.” Priebke was convicted in 1998 of murdering two victims of the massacre at the Ardeatine Caves near Rome, a reprisal for the killing of 33 German soldiers by resistance fighters.
WORLD
July 23, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
On a mission to hunt down long-elusive Nazi fugitives, Operation Last Chance was launched in major German cities Tuesday by the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center. The center's director for Israel, Efraim Zuroff, pronounced the quest to bring the remaining war criminals to justice during a news conference in Berlin and in a campaign manifesto issued in Jerusalem. Some 2,000 posters have been affixed to walls, billboards and transit stops in Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne, offering rewards of as much as 25,000 euros ($33,000)
OPINION
February 26, 2002
It amazes me that our government will go to great lengths to prosecute suspected Nazi war criminals yet ignore others ("Death Camp Suspect Loses His Citizenship," Feb. 22). There are many suspected Japanese war criminals alive today, most of them former guards at prison camps, who murdered and abused our men. They were never brought to justice. I know one by name and his whereabouts in Tokyo. A friend of mine, a former B-29 navigator who was shot down near Tokyo, also knows the name of another, who is now a successful businessman.
OPINION
October 18, 2007
Re "America's own unlawful combatants?" Oct. 15 The government of Iraq wants Blackwater USA out of Iraq. Can you blame it? Blackwater contractors are accountable to neither U.S. courts nor Iraqi courts. They are mercenaries immune from justice. Get them out. Use the money we are paying them to raise the salaries of U.S. soldiers. Maybe then our military men and women will be more likely to reenlist rather than "going Blackwater."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2011 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
When Carlos de Graca Lopes took over as director of Sao Martinho Prison in Cape Verde in 2001, he arrived with a warning for inmates: He had one hand made of velvet and another made of iron. Grab the velvet hand and be rewarded. Grab the iron hand and face the consequences. Over the next five years, Lopes ruled with his iron hand, according to a government indictment filed against him in Cape Verde. More than 150 times, the indictment alleges, he ordered or executed the beating and torture of prisoners, including spraying them in the face with water so they could not breathe and handcuffing them to an iron bar for weeks.
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Germany closed a 47-year-old loophole under which Nazi war criminals have been able to draw pension benefits for injuries sustained during World War II. Lawmakers quashed a 1950 rule that prevented regional authorities from refusing such benefits to German residents. War criminals living abroad had been denied such allowances.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | From Reuters
This nation on Tuesday proposed working with Israel to ensure that criminals who took part in the World War II massacre of 200,000 Jews in Lithuania are not rehabilitated. The Vilnius government, which recently won independence from Moscow, has been angered by U.S. reports that war criminals are being exonerated wholesale through its program to rehabilitate people condemned for resisting Nazi occupation or Soviet rule. But the government admitted that mistakes may have been made.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | Times staff and wire reports
Erich Priebke, a former Nazi SS captain who evaded arrest for nearly 50 years after taking part in one of the worst atrocities by German occupiers in Italy during World War II, died Friday in Rome. He was 100. Priebke was finally extradited to Italy from Argentina in 1995 to face trial for the 1944 massacre, and he was sentenced to life in prison. Because of his age, he was allowed to serve that sentence under house arrest at the home of his lawyer, Paolo Giachini. Giachini announced the death and released a final interview conducted with Priebke in July during which the German denied that Nazis gassed Jews during the Holocaust and accused the West of having fabricated the crimes to minimize the Allies' own abuses during the war. Priebke was tried and convicted for his role in the 1944 massacre of 335 civilians by Nazi forces at the Ardeatine Caves outside Rome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
Horrific scenes of a civil war that ravaged Guatemala were relived Wednesday in a Riverside courtroom as testimony continued in the case of a suspected war criminal accused of lying on documents in order to become a U.S. citizen. Jorge Sosa, a Moreno Valley martial arts instructor holding U.S. and Canadian citizenship, faces 15 years in prison and having his U.S. citizenship revoked if he's convicted of failing to disclose his involvement in the Guatemalan army during the civil war, authorities said.  Federal prosecutors say Sosa was a commander in the Guatemalan military's special operations force, known as the Kaibiles, and was involved in the 1982 massacre in the small village of Dos Eres.
WORLD
July 23, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
On a mission to hunt down long-elusive Nazi fugitives, Operation Last Chance was launched in major German cities Tuesday by the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center. The center's director for Israel, Efraim Zuroff, pronounced the quest to bring the remaining war criminals to justice during a news conference in Berlin and in a campaign manifesto issued in Jerusalem. Some 2,000 posters have been affixed to walls, billboards and transit stops in Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne, offering rewards of as much as 25,000 euros ($33,000)
OPINION
January 22, 2013
Re "Revisionism Tokyo-style," Opinion, Jan. 18 Postwar Japan is often juxtaposed with Germany, and for good reason. Tuesday is the 50th anniversary of the Elysee Treaty between France and Germany, which sealed their reconciliation. Meanwhile, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is recanting a previous administration's scant "apology" for World War II-era war crimes. Can one imagine German Chancellor Angela Merkel paying homage to Nazi war criminals? If not, why is the world silent when Abe visits the Yasukuni shrine, where the souls of 2 million war dead - including war criminals - are said to be enshrined?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The unlikeliest of road trips, "This Must Be the Place" puts a retired Goth rocker, played by Sean Penn, on the very cold trail of a Nazi war criminal. If the movie doesn't entirely get past its hard-to-buy premise, director Paolo Sorrentino does have the courage of his convictions, not just embracing every contradiction but spinning many of the story's contrivances into moments of strange, aching beauty. The loopy events concern the dazed but knowing Cheyenne, with Penn striking a tricky balance between eccentricity and childlike honesty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2011 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
When Carlos de Graca Lopes took over as director of Sao Martinho Prison in Cape Verde in 2001, he arrived with a warning for inmates: He had one hand made of velvet and another made of iron. Grab the velvet hand and be rewarded. Grab the iron hand and face the consequences. Over the next five years, Lopes ruled with his iron hand, according to a government indictment filed against him in Cape Verde. More than 150 times, the indictment alleges, he ordered or executed the beating and torture of prisoners, including spraying them in the face with water so they could not breathe and handcuffing them to an iron bar for weeks.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Argentine police arrested the wife of alleged Croatian war criminal Dinko Sakic on suspicion that she too was responsible for atrocities at a World War II concentration camp. Police detained Esperanza Sakic hours after receiving a formal request from Interpol Yugoslavia, the agency's operations chief in Argentina said. Suffering from Parkinson's disease and other illnesses, Esperanza Sakic was ordered by a judge to be kept under house arrest until it is decided whether she will be extradited.
WORLD
March 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Croatian Serb convicted of ethnic cleansing after leading a brutal revolt during the Balkan wars committed suicide in prison, the U.N. tribunal said. Milan Babic's suicide came three weeks after he reaffirmed his remorse for his crimes, telling a tribunal that his guilt was a "pain that I have to live with for the rest of my life."
WORLD
June 28, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Sudan's President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir showed up 24 hours late Tuesday for a meeting with his most important ally, an embarrassing example of what might happen when you host a head of state who is also an alleged war criminal. Bashir missed a summit meeting with Chinese President Hu Jintao scheduled for Monday, and offered as a belated explanation that his plane had to turn around because it did not have permission to fly over Turkmenistan. He was en route from Iran, where he attended an anti-terrorism conference.
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Shortly before the slaughter, Gen. Ratko Mladic patted the boys on their heads and offered them candy. He told the adults being herded in the city of Srebrenica that everything would be all right. Within days, Mladic's troops, said to be acting on his orders, had killed about 8,000 of Srebrenica's men and boys, lining them up, opening fire and dumping their bodies in mass graves; many of the women were raped. It was this chilling cynicism that marked Mladic, in the words of a former NATO officer, a world-class war criminal.
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