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War Powers Act

NEWS
April 27, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The air campaign in Yugoslavia has reignited debate in Congress over the controversial War Powers Resolution--the Vietnam-era legislation that gives lawmakers the power to halt a move by any president to launch military operations on his own. The issue will face a test today when a key House committee is slated to vote on a pair of proposals--filed under the resolution commonly referred to as the War Powers act--to force a choice between a declaration of war by Congress and a withdrawal of U.S.
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NEWS
April 15, 1999 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to the war in Kosovo, most members of Congress can be found closing the doors and drawing the blinds, preferring to wait until public opinion gels before taking a stand on a mission Americans are decidedly uneasy about. But one House member is bent on smoking them out--San Jose Republican Tom Campbell, who wants Congress to vote within the month to formally declare war on Yugoslavia or get out.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Republican-led effort to repeal the 1973 War Powers Act was narrowly defeated in the House on Wednesday, victim of what its once-confident sponsors conceded was "bad timing" in the midst of congressional anxiety over U.S. policy in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Despite an impassioned appeal by House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), a number of GOP freshmen sided with Democrats to defeat a repeal of the Vietnam War-era act by a 217-201 vote.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prospect of U.S. ground forces being sent to Bosnia-Herzegovina threatens to trigger a major confrontation between the Clinton Administration and Congress. Yet it could also act as a catalyst for one of the most important congressional foreign policy votes in more than two decades: repeal of the 1973 War Powers Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1995 | LISA RICHWINE, STATES NEWS SERVICE
Rep. Robert K. Dornan submitted legislation Thursday that would give the President more power to send U.S. troops into battle. The bill by Dornan (R-Garden Grove) would repeal the War Powers Act, a law passed in 1973 as the United States was phasing out its involvement in Vietnam. Congress used the measure to curtail the chief executive's authority to engage in prolonged military skirmishes.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton consulted congressional leaders Wednesday on his policy toward Bosnia but continued to avoid a firm commitment to seek congressional approval before deciding to send American forces there. The 1973 War Powers Act requires the President to notify Congress in most cases before sending troops into areas of potential hostilities and requires that the troops be withdrawn within 60 days if Congress does not authorize their presence.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
Here is the text of the operative portions of the Persian Gulf resolution passed Saturday by the Senate and House. SECTION 2. AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF FORCES (a) AUTHORIZATION--The President is authorized, subject to subsection (b), to use United States Armed Forces pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution 678 (1990) in order to achieve implementation of Security Council Resolutions 660, 661, 662, 664, 665, 666, 667, 669, 670, 674, and 677.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From United Press International
The American Civil Liberties Union, joined by 51 other national organizations, on Tuesday called on Congress to adopt a resolution intended to prevent President Bush from starting a war with Iraq without congressional approval. In a statement, the groups urged Congress, which is to convene a new session on Thursday, to "adopt, prior to the initiation of any offensive military action, a resolution asserting that . . .
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic leaders of Congress probably will move to cut off funding for Operation Desert Shield if President Bush orders an attack against Iraq without congressional approval, House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) declared Saturday. Gephardt, signaling a hardening of top Democratic policy on the Middle East, urged that economic sanctions against Iraq be given at least 18 months to work before any military action is taken.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Constitution, though vague on many points, is quite clear on one: "Congress shall have the power . . . to declare war." Yet the White House says President Bush can begin a war against Iraq on his own authority. Bush has promised only to "consult" with congressional leaders but not to seek a formal vote of approval by Congress. If the President is violating the Constitution, why doesn't someone go to court and force him to stop?
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