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War Victims

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WORLD
January 9, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The Mexican government on Wednesday enacted a controversial law aimed at giving recognition and recourse to tens of thousands of victims of the drug-related violence that has raged across the nation for the last six years. In a ceremony where survivors held photographs of missing or slain children, parents and spouses, President Enrique Peña Nieto said the law would require authorities to assist victims and establish a fund for possible reparations. “There is today a Mexico that has been hurt by crime,” the president said.
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WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Patrick McDonnell, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
ARSAL, Lebanon - The battle is not going well for rebels dug in across the nearby brown hills in Syria, where pro-government forces were closing in Saturday on the opposition stronghold of Yabroud. Syrian insurgents and their many supporters on this side of the border exhibit both bravado and anguish about a battle, and a war, that is fast slipping from their hands. "We have to keep on fighting to the last man, the last breath," Abu Omar, 21, who lost his left leg to a tank shell outside Yabroud, said from his hospital bed. "We have no choice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1988
In response to "War Prisoner" (letter, Sept. 29): I feel for those people who are victims of war. I feel for people who can't distinguish between being held captive by an enemy nation and being held captive by your own country, and I pray that people understand this major difference so that history does not do a repeat. JOHN J. SAITO Regional Director Japanese American Citizen League Los Angeles
WORLD
January 15, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Russia, an arms provider and principal player in the ongoing Syrian civil war, is doing far too little to help the war's millions of victims, international humanitarian agencies say. As world powers pledged new aid Wednesday at a donors conference in Kuwait, humanitarian groups said Moscow had been a standout in its failure to contribute adequately to the struggling international effort to help the injured and displaced. Russia has contributed about $24 million toward the United Nations appeal, about 5% of what it should give based on its size, according to Oxfam America.
WORLD
August 8, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - It must have seemed like a good idea at the time: a memorial to the thousands of victims of the drug violence that has convulsed Mexico for most of the last decade. Washington, after all, has its Vietnam War memorial. New York has its monument at the site of the World Trade Center. But even as the winning design was being announced, Mexico's tribute was stricken by the conflicting visions and bitter disputes that have driven wedges into Mexican society. Innocent civilians, police officers on duty and soldiers fighting drug cartels are among the more than 50,000 dead in the government's crackdown on the cartels.
WORLD
March 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Sudan is keeping aid workers from helping victims of fighting between the government and rebels, said officials of the International Committee of the Red Cross. The Red Cross, the United Nations and others have repeatedly protested their lack of access to the western region of Darfur, where aid agencies estimate that fighting has killed hundreds and forced more than 600,000 to flee.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The bloody tragedy of the decade-long El Salvador civil war has become so painfully familiar and persistent that it now belongs with the "impossible" strifes-without-end: Northern Ireland, Ethiopia, the Middle East. Media coverage has long ago cast the Salvadoran battle with a pall of weary sameness, nightly horrors that eventually numb the viewer. This, of course, is dangerous. To lose sight of this war would be to lose touch with the realities of Latin America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1985 | JANE GALBRAITH, Times Staff Writer
Not long ago, Francis Akonyu's fantasy was to have something to eat, to have the hair grow back on his head and to return to his homeland in Uganda with both of his parents alive. He also wished for a place without gunfire. Thursday, he was in Disneyland--far from famine, death, poverty, war and disease. Along with 30 other war orphans, the 11-year-old survivor was performing at the park as a member of the African Children's Choir.
NEWS
July 7, 2001
Serbian Interior Minister Dusan Mihajlovic said police believe that about 800 victims of the Kosovo war were buried in mass graves in the Yugoslav republic. He vowed that no one guilty of war crimes would escape justice. Mihajlovic, a leading member of the reformist alliance that last year ousted Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, said police would find out who had ordered the "monstrous operation" to transport bodies to mass graves across Serbia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998
An international panel made an impassioned plea Thursday for funds to build a children's hospital in the war-ravaged African country of Burundi. Among the speakers at a news conference at the African Community Resource Center at 6th Street and Vermont Avenue were a former vice president of Burundi, a member of the Albert Schweitzer Society International and Prince Daniel Grimaldi, a relative of the late Princess Diana.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
A makeshift bucket brigade hauled 14 pails of mud and slush from the tent that Um Mahmoud shares with a dozen other Syrian refugees in a ramshackle settlement here in the Bekaa Valley, now blanketed with snow that lends an alpine sheen to the rugged stretch that extends to the Syrian border. While holiday-makers from Beirut hastened to the hills with sleds and toboggans, piling souvenir snow onto their vehicles for the drive home, there was nothing merry about the weekend blizzard for the multitudes of Syrians living rough in makeshift camps scattered throughout the region.
WORLD
January 9, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The Mexican government on Wednesday enacted a controversial law aimed at giving recognition and recourse to tens of thousands of victims of the drug-related violence that has raged across the nation for the last six years. In a ceremony where survivors held photographs of missing or slain children, parents and spouses, President Enrique Peña Nieto said the law would require authorities to assist victims and establish a fund for possible reparations. “There is today a Mexico that has been hurt by crime,” the president said.
WORLD
August 8, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - It must have seemed like a good idea at the time: a memorial to the thousands of victims of the drug violence that has convulsed Mexico for most of the last decade. Washington, after all, has its Vietnam War memorial. New York has its monument at the site of the World Trade Center. But even as the winning design was being announced, Mexico's tribute was stricken by the conflicting visions and bitter disputes that have driven wedges into Mexican society. Innocent civilians, police officers on duty and soldiers fighting drug cartels are among the more than 50,000 dead in the government's crackdown on the cartels.
OPINION
November 9, 2011
The price of war Re "Remembering California's war dead," Nov. 6 You cite figures indicating that there have been 6,204 U.S. military deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan. As a veteran of World War II, I can still remember the wounds and suffering of that long-ago time. Veterans Day will soon be upon us, and it should bring home the fact that every war really represents a failure of humans to conduct their affairs in a sensible and civilized way. Dead soldiers are victims even more than they are heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
When Claudia Llosa was growing up in Lima, Peru, adolescence wasn't a time for hanging out with friends in the streets. The country was in the grip of a brutal civil war pitting the Maoist Shining Path guerrillas against a government determined to stamp them out at any cost. "The message was, 'Stay inside! Hide yourself! Be careful!' " Llosa, 33, recalled recently during an interview at a West Hollywood hotel, speaking in Spanish. "I knew that I would speak of the theme one day, but I didn't know how to come face to face with it. It was a reality that changed everything.
OPINION
February 15, 2010
Spain's world-famous magistrate, Baltasar Garzon, has made many enemies over the years. He has indicted Osama bin Laden. He has gone after Spanish paramilitaries, Basque separatists and members of drug mafias. On this side of the Atlantic, Garzon is best known as the judge who pushed the frontiers of international law, trying to extradite former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet from London and launching an inquiry into the suspected torture of detainees at the U.S. prison in Guantanamo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1993 | KURT PITZER
Calabasas High School students wrapped up a six-day cookie and candy sale Tuesday, netting about $740 for war victims in Bosnia. "We cannot go out and fight, we cannot go out and rescue people on the battlefield," said Calabasas French teacher Elisabeth Boghosian, who helped organize the bake sale. "This is one small way we can do something for those victims."
WORLD
September 7, 2009 | Associated Press
The skeletal remains of hundreds of people killed 15 years ago near the small Liberian village of Kpolokpai were transported in wheelbarrows to a marked mass grave Sunday where they were buried in a formal ceremony. The church service honoring the dead is intended to try to put to rest this particular chapter in Liberia's 14-year civil war, which left an estimated 250,000 people dead. Mourners, including church leaders and farmers, stood with their hands folded as the remains were lowered into a 10-foot-wide pit. Liberia's Truth and Reconciliation Commission determined that the Kpolokpai massacre in 1994 was led by fighters of the Liberia Peace Council, a rebel group fighting Charles Taylor's National Patriotic Front of Liberia.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2009 | Kim Murphy
Cpl. Anthony Alegre's unit knew the Humvees they drove through the streets of Ramadi, Iraq, were woefully under-armored. They stuffed sandbags in the doors, but when roadside bombs turned the sand into shrapnel, they began wedging pieces of metal and wood around their seats. No use. The car bomb that hit Alegre's patrol on May 29, 2004, killed three of his fellow Marines and left four pieces of metal in his brain. No one expected the 20-year-old infantryman to survive.
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