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War Victims Bosnia Herzegovina

NEWS
May 11, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. military observers entered the besieged Muslim enclave of Zepa in eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina on Monday to discover widespread destruction and fewer than 250 people left in a town of about 40,000 residents and refugees. The reports relayed to U.N. peacekeeping headquarters in Zagreb, Croatia, were the first independent confirmation of claims by the Muslim-led Bosnian government in Sarajevo that Zepa was the target of a fierce Bosnian Serb artillery attack that began last week. U.N.
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NEWS
April 7, 1993 | Associated Press
Half the children in war-torn Sarajevo have witnessed somebody die, the U.N. Children's Fund estimated Tuesday. A survey of 105 children in the capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina found 39% had lost at least one family member in the year-old battle for Sarajevo and 51% "have seen someone who was killed." UNICEF said 40% of the children interviewed in February had been shot at by snipers, 81% had been in situations in which they feared death and 72% said their homes were shelled.
NEWS
August 21, 1993 | Associated Press
Irma Hadzimuratovic, the 5-year-old Bosnian girl whose plight spurred an emergency airlift from Sarajevo, was taken off the critical list for the first time Friday. But a spokeswoman at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children said Irma still has a long way to go. Irma is being treated for meningitis and for shrapnel injuries caused by a Serbian mortar round that killed her mother July 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
For years, there was relatively little news about the case outside of Philadelphia. But recent weeks have found Mumia Abu-Jamal, who is facing death by lethal injection for the 1981 murder of a Philadelphia police officer, drawing a media spotlight. One that has widened in August. "I see this man's face everywhere," slain Officer Daniel Faulkner's widow, Maureen, lamented stonily on ABC's "Good Morning, America" Wednesday.
NEWS
November 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
The United Nations rushed in doctors and soldiers Sunday to protect hundreds of disabled patients caught in a no-man's-land between Bosnian government forces and Croatian troops. A team of Danish and Canadian doctors and nurses was dispatched to two hospitals in the Fojnica area, 25 miles west of the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, after most of the regular staff fled.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Succumbing to the black humor that prevails in this battle-scarred city, Sarajevans have been convulsed by belly laughs on hearing a "gesture of unity" proposed by the Serb gunmen who encircle them: The same nationalist rebels whose heavy artillery pounded this capital into rubble for two years have suggested sharing operation with the beleaguered cityfolk of a newly rebuilt tram network that serves only those trapped within the Serbian cordon.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His $580 May phone bill says it all: Zvonko Kutlesa may eat and sleep in Canoga Park, but his heart is in his war-torn homeland, the former Yugoslavia. At $1.60 a minute, he talks longingly to his pregnant wife, who returned to Croatia five months ago with their two children to practice medicine near the front lines. Kutlesa, 38, desperately wants to join her.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | JIM ABRAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES, Jim Abrams is senior at Santa Margarita High School.
While most of the world has watched the civil war in Bosnia-Herzegovina with a feeling of helplessness, a determined few have taken action and made a difference. Among them are Mazen Faysal and Ruba Kharuf. The Santa Margarita High School sophomores were inspired when Randy McCord, their world history teacher, posted articles from The Times about Sonia Hagel of Huntington Harbour.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pasa Kulendar weeps as she relates how her neighbor's son chopped down her plum tree. She is not distressed over loss of the last vestige of her cherished orchard; rather, she is overcome with gratitude for the wood that may keep her from freezing to death this winter. The 71-year-old, bedridden widow also has a secure source of water, at least as long as someone kind enough to fetch it is at hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1993 | KURT PITZER
Calabasas High School students wrapped up a six-day cookie and candy sale Tuesday, netting about $740 for war victims in Bosnia. "We cannot go out and fight, we cannot go out and rescue people on the battlefield," said Calabasas French teacher Elisabeth Boghosian, who helped organize the bake sale. "This is one small way we can do something for those victims."
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