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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1994
When Clinton and Yeltsin agreed to dismantle nuclear warheads, the verdict was: gone fission. GRACE BAUERLE Torrance
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 29, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Jamaican authorities have seized 3,300 warheads and a missile-making machine at the port of Kingston and sought help from international police in tracking the shipper, Jamaican media reported Friday. The unauthorized arms shipment was discovered Thursday afternoon in a police and customs operation carried out at a berth of Kingston Wharves, the RJR News site reported. A high-level investigation has been launched, and Jamaican police have asked for assistance from international law enforcement, the news service said.
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WORLD
September 15, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM-- Israel has 80 nuclear warheads and the potential to double that number, according to a new report by U.S. experts. In the Global Nuclear Weapons Inventories , recently published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists , proliferation experts Hans M. Kristensen and Robert S. Norris write that Israel stopped production of nuclear warheads in 2004. But the country has enough fissile material for an additional 115 to 190 warheads, according to the report, meaning it could as much as double its arsenal.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
To know where you are, it helps to know where you've been, right? So early in his deeply reported, deeply frightening story of America's massive nuclear arsenal, "Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety," investigative reporter Eric Schlosser takes us back to World War II and the Manhattan Project. The day after the "Trinity" test in the desert of New Mexico, dozens of scientists who had worked on the bomb signed a petition addressed to President Harry S. Truman.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
In the first sign of a looming interservice conflict, the Navy has put forward a plan that would give it control over more than four-fifths of the ballistic missile warheads permitted under the strategic arms reduction treaty being negotiated with the Soviet Union, eight Democratic congressmen concerned with military issues charged Thursday. The treaty is intended to reduce the total number of nuclear warheads permitted in the United States and Soviet strategic arsenals, and the legislators, led by House Armed Services Committee Chairman Les Aspin (D-Wis.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | From United Press International
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev told Secretary of State James A. Baker today that the Soviet Union will unilaterally reduce the number of short-range nuclear missiles in Europe by dismantling 500 warheads, U.S. officials said. The unilateral reduction, involving about 5% of Soviet short-range nuclear weapons in Europe, was seen by U.S. officials traveling with Baker as a way for the Soviets to step up political pressure on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to negotiate further reductions in short-range nuclear missiles.
NEWS
September 24, 1985 | ROBERT C. TOTH and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze is expected to offer a 40% cut in offensive nuclear warheads when he presents details of the Kremlin's latest arms offer during a meeting Wednesday with Secretary of State George P. Shultz, a congressman who specializes in arms control issues said Monday.
NEWS
September 3, 1987 | Associated Press
If Bonn makes good on its offer to retire its Pershing 1-A missiles, the United States will withdraw the aging weapons' American-owned nuclear warheads from West German territory, the State Department said Wednesday. It declined, however, to specify whether the warheads would be destroyed or saved for future use. Replying to a barrage of questions about the 72 Pershings, department spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley restated the U.S.
NEWS
November 13, 1985 | Associated Press
An MX Peacekeeper missile with four dummy warheads successfully flew 4,800 miles today to Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific in the second silo test-launch of an MX, the Air Force announced. The launch at 9:03 a.m. marked the midpoint in 20 test launches for the MX, which eventually will carry 10 independently targetable warheads, Air Force spokeswoman Cecilia Mitchell said.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | United Press International
A Trident 2 submarine missile carrying a load of dummy warheads malfunctioned shortly after blastoff today, prompting Air Force safety officers to blow up the errant rocket on radio command. It was the third failure in 15 test flights to date of the Navy's most powerful weapon and the Navy offered no explanation of today's mishap.
WORLD
September 15, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM-- Israel has 80 nuclear warheads and the potential to double that number, according to a new report by U.S. experts. In the Global Nuclear Weapons Inventories , recently published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists , proliferation experts Hans M. Kristensen and Robert S. Norris write that Israel stopped production of nuclear warheads in 2004. But the country has enough fissile material for an additional 115 to 190 warheads, according to the report, meaning it could as much as double its arsenal.
WORLD
April 12, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON -- A U.S. intelligence agency has concluded that North Korea has the capability to develop nuclear warheads small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, a congressman disclosed Thursday. Although U.S. experts believe that North Korea cannot hit the U.S. mainland with its missiles, a significant improvement in Pyongyang's weapons technology would be deeply disconcerting for U.S. policymakers. It would also help explain American measures -- including an emphasis on the U.S. ability to respond with nuclear weapons -- after weeks of warlike rhetoric from Pyongyang.
WORLD
April 11, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A U.S. intelligence agency has concluded that North Korea has the capability to develop nuclear warheads small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, a congressman disclosed Thursday. Although U.S. experts believe North Korea cannot hit the U.S. mainland with its missiles, a significant improvement in Pyongyang's weapons technology would be deeply disconcerting for U.S. policymakers. It would also help explain American measures - including an emphasis on the U.S. ability to respond with nuclear weapons - after weeks of warlike rhetoric from Pyongyang.
WORLD
April 11, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- A U.S. intelligence agency has concluded that North Korea has developed nuclear warheads small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, a congressman disclosed Thursday.  At a House armed services committee hearing focused on the budget, Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) read from what he said was an unclassified portion of a classified Defense Intelligence Agency study that states, "DIA assesses with moderate confidence the North currently has nuclear weapons capable of delivery by ballistic missiles.
WORLD
December 3, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Hoping to salvage his arms control legacy, President Obama called Monday for the renewal of a major post-Cold War agreement between the United States and Russia to secure and dismantle nuclear weapons left over from the former Soviet Union. In an appeal aimed at Moscow, Obama offered to renegotiate terms of the 20-year-old threat-reduction initiative known for its chief sponsors, former Sen. Sam Nunn and outgoing Sen. Richard G. Lugar, and use it as a template for future U.S. cooperation with Russia.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Seeking to reduce civilian casualties and collateral damage, the Pentagon will soon deploy a new generation of drones the size of model planes, packing tiny explosive warheads that can be delivered with pinpoint accuracy. Errant drone strikes have been blamed for killing and injuring scores of civilians throughout Pakistan and Afghanistan, giving the U.S. government a black eye as it targets elusive terrorist groups. The Predator and Reaper drones deployed in these regions typically carry 100-pound laser-guided Hellfire missiles or 500-pound GPS-guided smart bombs that can reduce buildings to smoldering rubble.
NEWS
September 29, 1985 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet arms reduction offer handed to President Reagan on Friday by Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze went somewhat further than Administration officials had expected, calling for a 50% cut in nuclear warheads and bombs, but it did not contain another feature that they consider crucial in any major arms control plan.
NEWS
June 7, 1989
At least 50 nuclear weapons and nine nuclear reactors, the products of U.S. and Soviet naval accidents since World War II, are lost on the ocean floor, Greenpeace officials said. "There are more likely more Soviet weapons and reactors on the bottom of the ocean," said William M. Arkin, co-author of the report by the Greenpeace environmental group, which favors nuclear-free seas, and the Institute for Policy Studies, a liberal research group. Since World War II, 10 U.S. and Soviet accidents and a U.S. decision to scuttle a reactor have left 50 sunken warheads and nine reactors on the ocean floor, the report said.
OPINION
November 16, 2011 | By Michael O'Hanlon
The deficit reduction plans now on the table in Washington require some $400 billion in defense spending cuts starting in 2013 and extending for a decade. To achieve that, tough choices will be needed. There is fat, but only so much. To avoid cutting any more muscle than necessary — especially in conventional forces, which do all of the actual fighting — we need to look to nuclear forces as well. Unfortunately, during last year's debate over ratification of the New START arms control treaty with Russia, the Obama administration agreed to demands from Senate Republicans to increase spending on nuclear capabilities.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Air Force plans to launch an experimental aircraft Thursday that could potentially reach speeds of 4,000 mph over the Pacific Ocean in a test flight that could give the Pentagon a new way to deliver a military strike anywhere around the globe within minutes. Built in Southern California, the unmanned X-51 WaveRider is being developed to deliver powerful warheads at tremendously high speeds with pinpoint accuracy almost anywhere on Earth. Military officials say the need for the technology became clear in 1998 when the U.S. military tried ?
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