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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1993 | DAVID WALSTAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as Kevin Costner, Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe, Robert Duvall, Richard Dean Anderson and others are saddling up with various Westerns as part of a resurgence in the genre, one of Hollywood's legendary Western streets is biting the dust. By the end of today, Warner Bros.
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BUSINESS
November 4, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Chmielewski is a Times staff writer.
In an attempt to make headway against rampant film piracy, Warner Bros. will distribute newly released films online in China. The studio struck a deal with Union Voole Technology in China to offer new movies, as well as those that have never been seen in Chinese theaters, at rental prices ranging from 60 cents to $1. The inexpensive video-on-demand service seeks to entice China's estimated 253 million Internet users to pay for Hollywood fare rather than download illicit copies.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Los Angeles jury on Thursday awarded Oscar-winning director Francis Ford Coppola a hefty $20 million in a lawsuit against Warner Bros. claiming the studio interfered with his plans to make a version of the classic tale "Pinocchio." Coppola--acclaimed director of the "Godfather" movies and "Apocalypse Now"--argued that Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2008 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
In the Harry Potter stories, wizards play chess with life-size, animated pieces. But when Warner Bros. pushed the release of the next film in the Potter franchise, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," from Nov. 21 to summer 2009, the studio set off a chess game of another sort that's being played out in Hollywood. In the last few weeks, distributors have shifted several major fall releases -- including the animated 3-D comedy "Bolt," the vampire thriller "Twilight," the James Bond adventure "Quantum of Solace" and the epic romance "Australia" -- to new dates in November, hoping to take advantage of the box-office void created by Harry's departure.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Chmielewski is a Times staff writer.
In an attempt to make headway against rampant film piracy, Warner Bros. will distribute newly released films online in China. The studio struck a deal with Union Voole Technology in China to offer new movies, as well as those that have never been seen in Chinese theaters, at rental prices ranging from 60 cents to $1. The inexpensive video-on-demand service seeks to entice China's estimated 253 million Internet users to pay for Hollywood fare rather than download illicit copies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1999 | JUDITH I. BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When most of us go to the movies, all we have to worry about is picking one movie and one theater. Imagine if you were the person responsible for persuading theater owners to buy that movie for 3,000 or more screens. And as if that weren't enough, imagine that you had to know not only about your new movie but about those of your competitors on all of the nation's roughly 35,000 screens. For as long as most people can remember at Warner Bros., that person was Barry Reardon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City planning board member David Gerred said he regrets having accepted $1,500 from Warner Bros. as the studio sought his agency's approval of a master development plan, but he has no plans to resign as a result. The contributions have sparked a political firestorm in Burbank, with critics calling for Gerred's ouster from the influential planning post. "I did not know that [Warner Bros.] had a matter that would be pending before the planning board," Gerred told The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty-one storyboards planning scenes for an upcoming Batman movie were stolen from a locked room at Warner Bros. studios, prompting an internal investigation at the Burbank lot, police said Tuesday. The 81 pencil sketches, valued at about $4,000 because of the labor involved in producing them, were on 8 1/2-by-11-inch sheets, the size of notebook paper. They were stolen between 7:30 p.m. Aug. 18 and 8 a.m. Aug. 19 from Building 34 on the Warner Bros. lot, Burbank Police Sgt.
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | JEANNETTE DeSANTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A public relations nightmare has erupted at Warner Bros. Studios, where Friday night tapings of such popular sitcoms as "Family Matters" have been drawing hundreds of visitors to a pristine adjoining neighborhood whose residents feel under siege. Homeowners say the studio audiences not only take up every available parking space on their quiet streets, but throw beer bottles, urinate in public and sometimes spray graffiti.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1996 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Wayne's chaps. James Dean's motorcycle. The Maltese Falcon. Those are among the objects on display--some of them for the first time--at the Warner Bros. Museum opening today on the studio's lot in Burbank. The 7,000-square-foot museum displays hundreds of items culled from the studio's costume, art, music and prop departments as well as the Warner Bros. archives at USC.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2008 | Geoff Boucher
Call it "Harry Potter and the Revolt of the Muggles." A day after Warner Bros. announced that it would be pulling the sixth "Potter" film off of its November release schedule and instead releasing it next July to take advantage of skimpy competition in the summer, fans of the popular franchise were lighting up the Internet with their rage Friday. Thousands signed online petitions, others organized boycotts and protests and a vast number expressed their reaction with tears or clenched fists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
Born in the depths of the Depression and Prohibition eras, the Hollywood gangster movie offers a compact distillation of the social ills and anxieties of 1930s America. Warner Bros., the studio most closely associated with the genre, has already dug into its archives for two fine box sets of tough-guy flicks (released in 2005 and 2006). Like the earlier collections, Volume 3, out Tuesday, reveals the shifting moral and sociological assumptions behind these crime movies while showcasing the fruitful early careers of James Cagney and Edward G. Robinson, the era's thuggish leading men of choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008 | Susan King
DURING animation's golden age, Michael Maltese and Tex Avery were two wild and crazy guys who created some of the era's wackiest cartoon shorts. Maltese wrote and story-boarded such classics as "One Froggy Evening" (starring Michigan J. Frog), "For Scent-imental Reasons" (Pepe Le Pew), "Duck Dodgers in the 24 1/2 th Century" (Daffy Duck, Porky Pig and Marvin the Martian) and "What's Opera, Doc?" (Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd, who sings the Wagnerian "Kill the Wabbit" song). Animation director Avery began his career at Walter Lantz's Universal cartoon studio before moving to Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
HE'S hardly as well known as Steven Spielberg and doesn't command nearly the respect of John Lasseter. But when it comes to cranking out consistent $100-million hits, few directors can match the track record of Roland Emmerich. Over the last 12 years, the German filmmaker has made four big-budget movies, and on average they have grossed $185 million. Emmerich's biggest hit, 1996's "Independence Day," grossed $50.2 million in its first U.S. weekend, eventually taking in more than $300 million.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2008 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Warner Bros. issued layoff notices Wednesday to about three dozen employees at its Burbank studio, citing the effect of the 2-month-old strike by Hollywood writers. The studio said last week that it had sent out written notice to more than 1,000 workers in its facilities division, advising them that they could potentially lose their jobs. A studio spokeswoman said Wednesday that those warnings had been misinterpreted by some media outlets, which reported that 1,000 people would be laid off.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2007 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Oscar-winning producer Alan Ladd Jr. and his business partner won a $3.2-million verdict Thursday in their four-year legal fight with Warner Bros. over fees from TV sales for such films as "Body Heat," the "Police Academy" comedies and "Chariots of Fire." A Los Angeles Superior Court jury ruled that the studio shortchanged Ladd and Jay Kanter's Ladd Co. in divvying up proceeds from worldwide television deals for their movies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Gilbert walked through downtown Washington, D.C. Or was it Chicago? Maybe Manhattan? In fact, it could be all three--and probably will be, before long. The new "downtown" set on the Warner Bros. Studios lot in Burbank, which opened last month, is expected to get heavy use from some of television's most popular one-hour dramas, including NBC's Emmy award-winning "West Wing." "We can make this set look like any downtown in the United States," said Gilbert, president of Warner Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | JEANNETTE DeSANTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warner Bros. Studios has overcome the final obstacle to implementing its master plan for development with permission granted by the Burbank City Council allowing the studio to use a portion of Franklin Avenue for construction of a parking garage.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2007 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Warner Bros., the studio behind the "Harry Potter" blockbusters, could find itself in an awkward position when author J.K. Rowling lets the black cat out of the bag next month about the ultimate fate of her characters.
NEWS
June 7, 2007
Hear them roar: Warner Bros. Pictures has optioned a "Thundercats" script from first-time screenwriter Paul Sopocy based on the popular 1980s animated television series about a pack of cats being chased through space by an evil sorcerer. It's envisioned as a computer-animated film, to be produced by Paula Weinstein.
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