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October 18, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
"The Dark Knight Rises" doesn't hit movie theaters for nine months, but Batman is at the heart of what may just be Warner Bros.' most important release of the fall. With the launch Tuesday of video game Arkham City, a sequel to 2009 hit Arkham Asylum that lets players control the Caped Crusader, the studio's Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment unit has one of the best-reviewed and most anticipated titles of the year. It's expected to generate hundreds of millions of dollars in sales.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
"The Dark Knight Rises" doesn't hit movie theaters for nine months, but Batman is at the heart of what may just be Warner Bros.' most important release of the fall. With the launch Tuesday of video game Arkham City, a sequel to 2009 hit Arkham Asylum that lets players control the Caped Crusader, the studio's Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment unit has one of the best-reviewed and most anticipated titles of the year. It's expected to generate hundreds of millions of dollars in sales.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer have invested in social games producer Kabam, marking the first move by Hollywood studios in the space since Walt Disney Co. acquired Playdom for $563 million two years ago. Unlike competitors such as Zynga that target casual players, Kabam goes after more hard-core players with games on Facebook, smartphones and tablets. First known for original games such as "Kingdoms of Camelot" and "Dragons of Atlantis," Kabam has in the last year started working on licensed titles based on movies.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Warner Bros. Entertainment on Tuesday shook up its lucrative home video division, ousting its president and folding the unit into a new structure that underscores the studio's future in delivering movies and TV shows digitally. Kevin Tsujihara, an 11-year studio veteran, was named president of the newly formed Warner Home Entertainment Group. He will oversee video, wireless and online operations, games and the studio's anti-piracy efforts. He also will be responsible for the new Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"Hitch," "24" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" are among the movies and television shows that AOL will sell through its new video portal under deals the Internet company has forged with major Hollywood studios. The partnerships, announced Thursday, represent AOL's latest efforts to become a destination for online video as the company tries to offset revenue it expects to lose from a recent decision to drop subscription fees for many high-speed customers.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Movies and television shows from Paramount Pictures will be available for sale through AOL's new video portal under a deal to be announced today. Classics such as "Breakfast at Tiffany's" and "Chinatown" and newer releases such as "Mission: Impossible III" will be sold for $9.99 to $19.99 each, comparable to fees at online services CinemaNow, MovieLink and Guba as well as sites operated by MySpace owner News Corp.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2006 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
Warner Bros. is shuttering an online division that was among the first studio-backed ventures to create original entertainment content exclusively for the Web. The closing of Warner Bros. Online, confirmed Wednesday, is part of a series of cost-saving cuts at the Burbank studio that began in earnest last fall. As a result, Warner is laying off 19 employees from the online unit. Forty people will be redeployed into the 1-year-old Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Warner Bros. is in advanced negotiations to acquire the popular movie ratings website Flixster, signaling the studio's big push into social networking. The Time Warner Inc.-owned studio is now the most likely buyer of privately owned Flixster Inc. and would pay close to $90 million in cash, according to people familiar with the matter. San Francisco-based Flixster allows consumers to rate and comment on movies, as well as see what others think of films using social networking tools.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Seeking to boost its relatively healthy business for classic movies on DVD, Warner Bros. has signed a multiyear deal to release 73 classic films produced by industry legend Samuel Goldwyn. Among the titles Warner is licensing from the producer's son Samuel Goldwyn Jr. are best picture Academy Award winner "The Best Years of Our Lives," the Lou Gehrig biopic "The Pride of the Yankees" with Gary Cooper, the musical "Guys and Dolls" with Marlon Brando and Frank Sinatra, and Danny Kaye's "Hans Christian Andersen.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2012 | By Steve Alexander
MINNEAPOLIS - There are a lot of screens on which to watch new movies: TV, laptop, tablet or smartphone. But until now you needed a TV signal, a disc or a movie-streaming Internet connection. Not for long. This week marks the debut of airport vending kiosks that rent or sell movies that can be watched in-flight on a Windows PC. The rental service, from Santa Monica-based Digiboo, is being introduced at a time when consumers are shifting away from movie rentals to online movie streaming.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Chmielewski is a Times staff writer.
In an attempt to make headway against rampant film piracy, Warner Bros. will distribute newly released films online in China. The studio struck a deal with Union Voole Technology in China to offer new movies, as well as those that have never been seen in Chinese theaters, at rental prices ranging from 60 cents to $1. The inexpensive video-on-demand service seeks to entice China's estimated 253 million Internet users to pay for Hollywood fare rather than download illicit copies.
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