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BUSINESS
February 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Taking its battle against piracy of films and music to the front lines, Warner Home Video said it would sell cut-rate DVDs in China in a bid to compete on counterfeiters' home turf. Basic DVDs, to be available shortly after a film's theatrical release, will sell in China for as little as 22 yuan ($2.65), the company said. That's still more than the pirated versions readily available in China for 8 yuan. Warner hopes its efforts will persuade the government to do more to stamp out the fakes.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Taking its battle against piracy of films and music to the front lines, Warner Home Video said it would sell cut-rate DVDs in China in a bid to compete on counterfeiters' home turf. Basic DVDs, to be available shortly after a film's theatrical release, will sell in China for as little as 22 yuan ($2.65), the company said. That's still more than the pirated versions readily available in China for 8 yuan. Warner hopes its efforts will persuade the government to do more to stamp out the fakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1989
After reading Tom Killion's report on the earthquake's effect on Santa Cruz (Opinion, Nov. 12), I was once again angered at the senseless loss of life we foist upon ourselves because of our misguided taste for 19th-Century architecture and cheap rent. Every time I see an old so-called "charming Victorian" building, I think of broken bodies and crushed skulls.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will there be enough copies of "Batman" for all those eager customers when it makes its home video bow on Wednesday? Maybe not. Shades of "E.T.," some industry executives are lamenting. They're fearing that what happened with MCA's "E.T." last fall--drastic shortages due to underestimated demand--may be repeated with Warner Video's "Batman." Speculation about shortages surfaced not long after the Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1989
After reading Tom Killion's report on the earthquake's effect on Santa Cruz (Opinion, Nov. 12), I was once again angered at the senseless loss of life we foist upon ourselves because of our misguided taste for 19th-Century architecture and cheap rent. Every time I see an old so-called "charming Victorian" building, I think of broken bodies and crushed skulls.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Chmielewski is a Times staff writer.
Hollywood is singing the holiday blues. Several major studios and consumer electronics companies are bankrolling a $25-million marketing campaign this holiday season to promote Blu-ray movie discs. The commercials will begin airing this month on television shows and cable channels that attract heavily male audiences (the classic technology early adopter), such as Fox's NFL games, ESPN, Comedy Central and the Discovery Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will there be enough copies of "Batman" for all those eager customers when it makes its home video bow on Wednesday? Maybe not. Shades of "E.T.," some industry executives are lamenting. They're fearing that what happened with MCA's "E.T." last fall--drastic shortages due to underestimated demand--may be repeated with Warner Video's "Batman." Speculation about shortages surfaced not long after the Oct.
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