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Warnings

WORLD
April 1, 2014 | By Ron Lin
Observed tsunami heights reached nearly 7 feet in the Chilean port city of Iquique in the wake of Tuesday's magnitude 8.2 earthquake off the nation's northern coast. But by early Wednesday local time, the U.S. Pacific Tsunami Warning Center lifted tsunami warnings and watches for Chile and other Latin American countries. A major tsunami was also not expected in Hawaii, but an advisory was in place because of expected strong currents that could pose a hazard for swimmers and boaters.
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WORLD
April 1, 2014 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul
SANTIAGO, Chile - A shallow and powerful magnitude 8.2 earthquake rocked Chile's northern coast Tuesday, sparking fires, churning up high waves, causing landslides and cutting power for thousands of people. A fireman and an elderly heart attack victim were among five people reported dead from the quake, but authorities had yet to assess widespread damage. Evacuations were ordered in expectation of waves as high as 16 feet along the Pacific coast of Chile, neighboring Peru and elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
No tsunami threat to California or the U.S. West Coast was immediately seen after a magnitude 8.0 earthquake hit off the west coast of Chile, the U.S. National Tsunami Warning Center said. No tsunami warning would probably be issued for California “unless we see something we don't expect,” Paul Whitmore, director of the U.S. National Tsunami Warning Center, told the Los Angeles Times. Related: Tsunami evacuations ordered after Chile earthquake A magnitude 8.0 earthquake has already generated 6-foot-high tsunami waves in Chile, Whitmore said.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Climate change is already affecting every continent and ocean, posing immediate and growing risks to people, an international panel of scientists warned Monday. The longer society delays steps to cut the release of planet-warming greenhouse gases, the more severe and widespread the harm will be, said the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The report, which collects and summarizes thousands of scientific studies, is the panel's starkest yet in laying out the risks facing nature and society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Glendora officials are warning residents that steady rain expected overnight Monday could produce "light mudflows" in areas affected by the Colby fire. City officials raised their alert level from green to yellow Sunday in anticipation of the storm system that could deliver up to an inch of rain in hillside areas left bare by the 2,000-acre Colby fire late last year. Earlier this year, residents in Azusa and Glendora were ordered to evacuate as a large storm caused minor debris and mudflows that damaged some properties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Officials with the U.S. Geological Survey were advising Southern California residents Monday evening about a hoax letter that is warning of an "impending large quake. " The letter with the agency's logo was apparently being sent to residents in Orange County, urging them to be prepared for a large quake. "California is issuing a statewide warning," the letter states. The agency advises residents to check the USGS website for the latest earthquake information. The letter comes in the wake of Friday's 5.1 magnitude temblor centered in La Habra.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2014
Risks and warnings The State Department continues to warn U.S. citizens to defer all non-essential travel to Ukraine and all travel to the Crimean Peninsula and eastern areas of Kharkiv, Donetsk and Lugansk due to tensions in the region. The U.S. believes that Russia is likely to continue to take further actions in the Crimean Peninsula consistent with its claim of annexation. The State Department also warns U.S. citizens to consider carefully the risks of travel to Mali, given terrorist activity there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
A prototype earthquake early-warning system worked again Friday night, giving seismologists in Pasadena about a four-second heads-up before shaking was felt from the magnitude 5.1 quake that struck near La Habra. The system is being tested by a team of scientists on a U.S. Geological Survey project to create a statewide network. USGS seismologist Lucy Jones has said the system works because while earthquakes travel at the speed of sound, sensors that initially detect the shaking near the epicenter of a quake can send a message faster -- at the speed of light -- to warn residents farther away that the quake is coming.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | David Lazarus
Airlines will never win a prize for sensitivity to customers' problems. They typically won't budge on change fees and ticketing costs. But you'd think that even the most hard-hearted carrier would acknowledge that, all things considered, this isn't the best time for a family trip to Russia. The situation in Ukraine prompted the U.S. State Department to issue a travel advisory March 14 warning Americans about "the possibility of violence or anti-U.S. actions directed against U.S. citizens or U.S. interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Although water-starved Southern California needs all the rain it can get, weather forecasters say the light sprinkles falling across the region Wednesday will likely only be enough to cause problems during the morning commute. National Weather Service officials are expecting less than a tenth of an inch of rain from the cold front passing through Los Angeles. Meteorologist Kathy Hoxsie said the rain could be so light that it will only serve to lift oil off the roads without washing it away, creating slick conditions for drivers.
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