Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWarren Luhrs
IN THE NEWS

Warren Luhrs

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 28, 1989
Georgs Kolesnikovs and Steve Pettengill, sailing the 60-foot trimaran Great American in the Cape Horn Challenge race from New York to San Francisco, reported Thursday afternoon that they were 507 nautical miles ahead of the record set in February by Warren Luhrs on the monohull Thursday's Child. Thursday's Child's record is 80 days 20 hours, which erased the mark of 89 days 8 hours set by the clipper ship Flying Cloud 135 years ago.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 27, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Unemployed, under-funded, every bit an underdog--and under the Golden Gate Bridge in record time. Georgs Kolesnikovs, son of Latvian refugees and a self-styled "middle-aged cruising sailor," fooled the experts Friday when he finished the 14,000-mile Cape Horn Challenge from New York in 76 days, 23 hours, 20 minutes 17 seconds. That broke the record set last February by Warren Luhrs, a Florida sailboat builder whose time of 80 days, 20 hours, 17 minutes had broken the legendary record of 89 days, 8 hours set by the clipper ship Flying Cloud in 1854.
Advertisement
SPORTS
February 11, 1989 | DAN BYRNE, Special to The Times
Warren Luhrs still is poised to break the 89-day 8-hour sailing record set by the clipper ship Flying Cloud on a voyage from New York to San Francisco in 1854 but he wasn't able to do it Friday, as he had hoped. Luhrs, sailing Thursday's Child, an ultra-light sloop, still was 190 miles short of the Golden Gate at mid-day Friday. Best guess now for Thursday Child's arrival under the Golden Gate Bridge is mid-day Sunday.
SPORTS
April 28, 1989
Georgs Kolesnikovs and Steve Pettengill, sailing the 60-foot trimaran Great American in the Cape Horn Challenge race from New York to San Francisco, reported Thursday afternoon that they were 507 nautical miles ahead of the record set in February by Warren Luhrs on the monohull Thursday's Child. Thursday's Child's record is 80 days 20 hours, which erased the mark of 89 days 8 hours set by the clipper ship Flying Cloud 135 years ago.
SPORTS
April 22, 1989 | Special to The Times
Great American, the last of five sailboats to leave New York in the Cape Horn Challenge race against time to San Francisco, was reported 300 miles past the turning point Friday and 2 days 7 hours ahead of the record. The 60-foot trimaran, with skipper Georgs Kolesnikovs and Steve Pettengill aboard, is chasing the record of 80 days, 20 hours set in mid-February by Warren Luhrs' 60-foot monohull Thursday's Child, which beat the 135-year-old record of 89 days 8 hours by the clipper ship Flying Cloud.
SPORTS
May 27, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Unemployed, under-funded, every bit an underdog--and under the Golden Gate Bridge in record time. Georgs Kolesnikovs, son of Latvian refugees and a self-styled "middle-aged cruising sailor," fooled the experts Friday when he finished the 14,000-mile Cape Horn Challenge from New York in 76 days, 23 hours, 20 minutes 17 seconds. That broke the record set last February by Warren Luhrs, a Florida sailboat builder whose time of 80 days, 20 hours, 17 minutes had broken the legendary record of 89 days, 8 hours set by the clipper ship Flying Cloud in 1854.
SPORTS
February 10, 1989 | DAN BYRNE, Special to The Times and Dan Byrne, a former news editor at The Times, sailed around the world in 1982-83 in a solo sailboat race.
One of the great sailing records is about to fall. Warren Luhrs and his crew of two aboard Thursday's Child, a 60-foot ultra-light sloop, Thursday were 325 miles south of San Francisco and 200 miles west of San Diego. In their grasp is sailing's oldest undisputed speed record, the clipper ship Flying Cloud's 89-day 8-hour passage from New York to San Francisco in 1854. Thursday's Child was nine days ahead of Flying Cloud's pace after 13,650 nautical miles.
SPORTS
February 13, 1989 | DAN BYRNE, Special to The Times
Warren Luhrs brought his 60-foot sloop, Thursday's Child, under the Golden Gate Bridge and into history Sunday. A cannon fired from the St. Francis Yacht Club to mark the end of an 80-day 20-hour voyage from New York around Cape Horn. The time beat by 8 days 12 hours the clipper ship Flying Cloud's 1854 passage at the height of the Gold Rush. Flying Cloud's time of 89 days 8 hours had stood in the record book for 135 years.
SPORTS
March 30, 1989 | From Times wire services
A French stunt man failed to set a 'round-the-Horn record today but slowly continued to work his way toward San Francisco in seeking to become the first solo sailor to make the 14,000-mile voyage from New York. Philippe Monnet, 30, was unable to reach the Golden Gate before 7:42 a.m., leaving intact the record of 80 days, 20 hours set Feb. 12 by Warren Luhrs and crew in the 60-foot Thursday's Child for sailing from New York to San Francisco around Cape Horn.
SPORTS
September 1, 1986 | United Press International
A yacht involved in a collision at the start of a 27,500-mile solo race around the world restarted Sunday as 23 other boats from 10 countries completed the first 100 miles in the second annual BOC Challenge. Thursday's Child, piloted by American Warren Luhrs, was hit in the stern Saturday by Ecureuil D'Aquitane, skippered by Frenchman Titouan Lamazou. Lamazou was trying to avoid a small craft when it hit Thursday's Child. Luhrs was towed to port with rudder damage and a broken antennae.
SPORTS
April 22, 1989 | Special to The Times
Great American, the last of five sailboats to leave New York in the Cape Horn Challenge race against time to San Francisco, was reported 300 miles past the turning point Friday and 2 days 7 hours ahead of the record. The 60-foot trimaran, with skipper Georgs Kolesnikovs and Steve Pettengill aboard, is chasing the record of 80 days, 20 hours set in mid-February by Warren Luhrs' 60-foot monohull Thursday's Child, which beat the 135-year-old record of 89 days 8 hours by the clipper ship Flying Cloud.
SPORTS
February 13, 1989 | DAN BYRNE, Special to The Times
Warren Luhrs brought his 60-foot sloop, Thursday's Child, under the Golden Gate Bridge and into history Sunday. A cannon fired from the St. Francis Yacht Club to mark the end of an 80-day 20-hour voyage from New York around Cape Horn. The time beat by 8 days 12 hours the clipper ship Flying Cloud's 1854 passage at the height of the Gold Rush. Flying Cloud's time of 89 days 8 hours had stood in the record book for 135 years.
SPORTS
February 11, 1989 | DAN BYRNE, Special to The Times
Warren Luhrs still is poised to break the 89-day 8-hour sailing record set by the clipper ship Flying Cloud on a voyage from New York to San Francisco in 1854 but he wasn't able to do it Friday, as he had hoped. Luhrs, sailing Thursday's Child, an ultra-light sloop, still was 190 miles short of the Golden Gate at mid-day Friday. Best guess now for Thursday Child's arrival under the Golden Gate Bridge is mid-day Sunday.
SPORTS
February 10, 1989 | DAN BYRNE, Special to The Times and Dan Byrne, a former news editor at The Times, sailed around the world in 1982-83 in a solo sailboat race.
One of the great sailing records is about to fall. Warren Luhrs and his crew of two aboard Thursday's Child, a 60-foot ultra-light sloop, Thursday were 325 miles south of San Francisco and 200 miles west of San Diego. In their grasp is sailing's oldest undisputed speed record, the clipper ship Flying Cloud's 89-day 8-hour passage from New York to San Francisco in 1854. Thursday's Child was nine days ahead of Flying Cloud's pace after 13,650 nautical miles.
SPORTS
May 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
The crippled trimaran Great American sailed through the Golden Gate today, snapping a 3-month-old New York-to-San Francisco sailing record by three days after an exhausting 77-day, 14,500-mile voyage. Latvian-born skipper Georgs Kolesnikovs, 46, of Niagara Falls, Canada, and crewman Steve Pettengill, 37, Newport, R.I., sailing slowly in light morning winds, received a raucous greeting from a fleet of boats which met the 60-foot, 12,000-pound vessel. "We thought he was blown at the beginning," said Commodore Mike Fortenbaugh of the Manhattan Yacht Club, which sponsored a trophy for the fastest trip.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|