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Warren Spahn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2003 | Mike Kupper, Times Staff Writer
Hall of Fame pitcher Warren Spahn, who won 363 games, more than any other left-hander in major league baseball history, died Monday at his home in Broken Arrow, Okla. He was 82. The cause of death was not announced. Spahn had been hospitalized twice in the last year, for internal bleeding and a broken leg. The high-kicking, smooth-throwing Spahn spent 21 seasons in the majors, 20 of them with the Boston-Milwaukee Braves, for whom he pitched all but seven of his victories.
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SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
Shani Davis qualified for the 2014 U.S. Olympic speedskating team in three individual events, winning two of them - the 1,000 and 1,500 meters - at the recent Olympic trials. That gives him a chance to become the first man in the world to win long-track gold medals in three Olympics - he took the 1,000 meters in 2006 and 2010 - and the first U.S. man in any sport to win gold at three Winter Games. Should Davis do that, he will cement his status in the pantheon of speedskating greats.
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SPORTS
July 13, 1987
Larry Doby hit a two-run double to lead the American League to a 4-1 victory over the National League in an old-timers game at Oakland. A total of 24 Hall of Fame members were introduced, including Joe DiMaggio, Warren Spahn, Duke Snider, Bob Gibson, Catfish Hunter and Willie Mays.
SPORTS
May 27, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Ricky Nolasco etched his name in the record book of the Miami Marlins last week passing Dontrelle Willis to become the Marlins' all-time leader in victories. He tops a list on which Josh Johnson ranks third, A.J. Burnett fourth and Brad Penny fifth. Nolasco doesn't quite evoke the emotion of, say, Bob Gibson or Warren Spahn. Then again, the Marlins have only been in business since 1993. Here's a look at the winningest pitcher in the history of each current major league franchise in order of victories: Team: Pitcher, Wins Twins/Senators: Walter Johnson, 417 Giants: Christy Mathewson, 372 Braves: Warren Spahn, 356 Athletics: Eddie Plank, 284 Orioles: Jim Palmer, 268 Indians: Bob Feller, 266 White Sox: Ted Lyons, 260 Cardinals: Bob Gibson, 251 Phillies: Steve Carlton, 241 Yankees: Whitey Ford, 236 Dodgers: Don Sutton, 233 Tigers: Hooks Dauss, 223 Pirates: Wilbur Cooper, 202 Cubs: Charlie Root, 201 Mets: Tom Seaver, 198 Red Sox: Roger Clemens and Cy Young, 192 Reds: Eppa Rixey, 179 Blue Jays: Dave Stieb, 175 Royals: Paul Splittorff, 166 Angels: Chuck Finley, 165 Nationals/Expos: Steve Rogers, 158 Mariners: Jamie Moyer, 145 Astros: Joe Niekro, 144 Rangers: Charlie Hough, 139 Diamondbacks: Randy Johnson, 118 Brewers: Jim Slaton, 117 Padres: Eric Show, 100 Rays: James Shields,...
SPORTS
August 11, 2006
Major League Baseball's career win leaders: 1. Cy Young...511 2. Walter Johnson...417 3. Grover Cleveland Alexander...373 3. Christy Mathewson...373 5. Pud Galvin...365 6. Warren Spahn...363 7. Kid Nichols...361 8. x-Roger Clemens...345 9. Tim Keefe...342 10. Steve Carlton...329 11. x-Greg Maddux...328 11. John Clarkson...328 x -- active - Source: mlb.com
SPORTS
July 21, 1999
The number of writers not voting for Hall of Fame inductees the year they were elected: Hank Aaron: nine of 415 Ty Cobb: four of 226 Joe DiMaggio: 28 of 251 Stan Musial: 23 of 340 Babe Ruth: 11 of 226 Nolan Ryan: six of 497 Warren Spahn: 64 of 380 Ted Williams: 20 of 302 Cy Young: 48 of 201 Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
January 3, 1999
I do not want to condone the wisdom of signing any professional player to a seven-year contract. I do take exception to David Goodman's letter [Dec. 26] in which he listed what he called the "most dominant pitchers of the past half-century." He omitted a Hall of Fame pitcher who won 363 games during his career and remains the winningest left-handed pitcher in the history of the game. Warren Spahn turned 34 on April 23, 1955, and during the next nine years he won 184 games. He won 20 or more games in seven of those years while he pitched an average of 273 innings per year and carried an earned-run average of slightly less than 3.00.
SPORTS
April 20, 1991
You recently published a narrative of Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak of 1941, calling it the baseball record that will never be broken. I submit that the record that will not be broken until the rules of the game are radically revised (or until the human body changes) is Cy Young's 511 games won. Only one other pitcher has won over 400 (Walter Johnson, 416) and of all pitchers active in the last 60 years, the leader is Warren Spahn (363). Nolan Ryan may have the strongest arm ever and he has just over 300 victories.
SPORTS
May 27, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Ricky Nolasco etched his name in the record book of the Miami Marlins last week passing Dontrelle Willis to become the Marlins' all-time leader in victories. He tops a list on which Josh Johnson ranks third, A.J. Burnett fourth and Brad Penny fifth. Nolasco doesn't quite evoke the emotion of, say, Bob Gibson or Warren Spahn. Then again, the Marlins have only been in business since 1993. Here's a look at the winningest pitcher in the history of each current major league franchise in order of victories: Team: Pitcher, Wins Twins/Senators: Walter Johnson, 417 Giants: Christy Mathewson, 372 Braves: Warren Spahn, 356 Athletics: Eddie Plank, 284 Orioles: Jim Palmer, 268 Indians: Bob Feller, 266 White Sox: Ted Lyons, 260 Cardinals: Bob Gibson, 251 Phillies: Steve Carlton, 241 Yankees: Whitey Ford, 236 Dodgers: Don Sutton, 233 Tigers: Hooks Dauss, 223 Pirates: Wilbur Cooper, 202 Cubs: Charlie Root, 201 Mets: Tom Seaver, 198 Red Sox: Roger Clemens and Cy Young, 192 Reds: Eppa Rixey, 179 Blue Jays: Dave Stieb, 175 Royals: Paul Splittorff, 166 Angels: Chuck Finley, 165 Nationals/Expos: Steve Rogers, 158 Mariners: Jamie Moyer, 145 Astros: Joe Niekro, 144 Rangers: Charlie Hough, 139 Diamondbacks: Randy Johnson, 118 Brewers: Jim Slaton, 117 Padres: Eric Show, 100 Rays: James Shields,...
SPORTS
June 27, 1986 | Jim Murray
It is the nose you notice first. It is an imperious instrument, aloof, disdainful, regal. You imagine Caesar had such a nose. Cyrano. De Gaulle certainly did. It has a nobility all its own. The nose of a man who likes to take charge. The eyes that sight down along its moraines and crevasses are alight with inquisitiveness, wariness, alertness. They are the eyes of the scout going through Indian country in advance of the wagon train. They see everything, miss nothing.
SPORTS
August 11, 2006
Major League Baseball's career win leaders: 1. Cy Young...511 2. Walter Johnson...417 3. Grover Cleveland Alexander...373 3. Christy Mathewson...373 5. Pud Galvin...365 6. Warren Spahn...363 7. Kid Nichols...361 8. x-Roger Clemens...345 9. Tim Keefe...342 10. Steve Carlton...329 11. x-Greg Maddux...328 11. John Clarkson...328 x -- active - Source: mlb.com
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2003 | Mike Kupper, Times Staff Writer
Hall of Fame pitcher Warren Spahn, who won 363 games, more than any other left-hander in major league baseball history, died Monday at his home in Broken Arrow, Okla. He was 82. The cause of death was not announced. Spahn had been hospitalized twice in the last year, for internal bleeding and a broken leg. The high-kicking, smooth-throwing Spahn spent 21 seasons in the majors, 20 of them with the Boston-Milwaukee Braves, for whom he pitched all but seven of his victories.
SPORTS
July 21, 1999
The number of writers not voting for Hall of Fame inductees the year they were elected: Hank Aaron: nine of 415 Ty Cobb: four of 226 Joe DiMaggio: 28 of 251 Stan Musial: 23 of 340 Babe Ruth: 11 of 226 Nolan Ryan: six of 497 Warren Spahn: 64 of 380 Ted Williams: 20 of 302 Cy Young: 48 of 201 Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
January 3, 1999
I do not want to condone the wisdom of signing any professional player to a seven-year contract. I do take exception to David Goodman's letter [Dec. 26] in which he listed what he called the "most dominant pitchers of the past half-century." He omitted a Hall of Fame pitcher who won 363 games during his career and remains the winningest left-handed pitcher in the history of the game. Warren Spahn turned 34 on April 23, 1955, and during the next nine years he won 184 games. He won 20 or more games in seven of those years while he pitched an average of 273 innings per year and carried an earned-run average of slightly less than 3.00.
SPORTS
April 20, 1991
You recently published a narrative of Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak of 1941, calling it the baseball record that will never be broken. I submit that the record that will not be broken until the rules of the game are radically revised (or until the human body changes) is Cy Young's 511 games won. Only one other pitcher has won over 400 (Walter Johnson, 416) and of all pitchers active in the last 60 years, the leader is Warren Spahn (363). Nolan Ryan may have the strongest arm ever and he has just over 300 victories.
SPORTS
April 20, 1989 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
EDITOR'S NOTE Laker center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar will retire after this season at 42, ending a remarkable career in the National Basketball Assn. He was planning to retire at 40 but changed his mind and returned for two more seasons. Those two seasons have generated a great deal of comment, positive and negative, on his decision, an indication that fans are deeply interested in when, and how, great athletes retire. In this story, Bob Oates explores how some famous athletes feel about it. As his Oklahoma friends observed the other day, cattle rancher Warren Spahn was a National League diamond star when he bought this place, the Diamond Star ranch here in Pittsburg County, 40 years ago. A left-handed pitcher, he was then in the midst of a Hall of Fame career.
SPORTS
July 26, 1986
Warren Spahn, at a luncheon, was promoting tonight's old-timers' game in Arlington, Tex., when a fan asked: "Late in your career, were you pitching from off the rubber?" According to Steve Schoenfeld of the Dallas Times Herald, Spahn said: "Where did you hear that? It must have come from the Dodgers. They used to accuse me of that. Then, Don Drysdale would start from in front of the rubber, and he threw BBs. He didn't need any help." Spahn did admit to trying a spitter, however.
SPORTS
July 13, 1987
Larry Doby hit a two-run double to lead the American League to a 4-1 victory over the National League in an old-timers game at Oakland. A total of 24 Hall of Fame members were introduced, including Joe DiMaggio, Warren Spahn, Duke Snider, Bob Gibson, Catfish Hunter and Willie Mays.
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