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Washington Capitals Hockey Team

SPORTS
June 14, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With one brilliant play Saturday night in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals, Detroit center Sergei Fedorov demonstrated the skills that made him the Red Wings' $38-million man. Fedorov, who had not scored a point in the first two games of the series, took the life out the Washington Capitals with a goal at 15:09 of the third period that gave the Red Wings a 2-1 victory before a sellout crowd of 19,740 at MCI Center.
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SPORTS
June 14, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE
Three games, three losses and each by a goal. That's the summary of Washington's first Stanley Cup finals appearance inasmuch as they face elimination after losing, 2-1, to the Detroit Red Wings in Game 3 on Saturday night. "They are the champs," Washington forward Craig Berube said when asked about the difference between the teams. "They have been [in the finals three of the last four years]. They know how to win. We don't know how, that's the difference. It is not a matter of effort. . . .
SPORTS
June 13, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minutes after Detroit's 5-4 Game 2 overtime victory, Coach Scotty Bowman said that his Red Wings' depth had worn down the Washington Capitals, who became the first team in the history of the Stanley Cup finals to lose a game after leading by two goals twice in the third period. On Friday, Washington Coach Ron Wilson disagreed, saying the Capitals had four lines to match up against the Red Wings. "The line with Dale Hunter, Craig Berube and Chris Simon . . .
SPORTS
June 12, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A big momentum swing in Detroit's 5-4 overtime victory over Washington on Thursday night occurred with the score 1-0 early in the second period. After a solid first period, the Red Wings lost the lead and control of the game when goaltender Chris Osgood elected not to play the puck because he thought referee Don Koharski would call Washington for icing.
SPORTS
June 12, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Detroit Red Wings on Thursday showed why they are the defending Stanley Cup champions, and did so in highly entertaining fashion. The Red Wings twice had to rally in the third period from two-goal deficits to send the game into overtime and then defeated the Washington Capitals, 5-4, on a goal by Kris Draper with 4:36 left in the extra period to take a 2-0 lead in the Stanley Cup finals best-of-seven series.
SPORTS
June 11, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe it's because Detroit and Washington have so many old-school veterans with common ties, or maybe the Red Wings and Capitals have just been too worn down by the long season, but this year's Stanley Cup finals may well be a showcase of "nice hockey". The way the teams made sure not to give up any bulletin-board material a day after the Red Wings' 2-1 victory in Game 1, you would have thought the best-of-seven series had turned into a lovefest. No put-downs or insults.
SPORTS
June 10, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Detroit Coach Scotty Bowman may have gained his 29th Stanley Cup finals victory with the Red Wings' 2-1 win over Washington on Tuesday night but he didn't feel too good about his coaching. "I didn't think I had a good game myself as a coach," said Bowman, who moved three victories away from tying Toe Blake for the most Stanley Cups won by a coach with eight. "We were mixed up in the first half of the game and we had too many different line combinations and I have to do a better job on that."
SPORTS
June 10, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Detroit Red Wings are regarded as the NHL's premier team because they can beat you in so many different ways. If their top scorers, Sergei Fedorov and Brendan Shanahan, don't beat you, their defense and role players will.
SPORTS
June 9, 1998 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the start of any hockey playoff series, goaltending is regarded as the deciding factor for each team's success, and this year's NHL Stanley Cup finals is no different. Detroit's Chris Osgood and Washington's Olaf Kolzig are well aware of the pressure they will be under when the Red Wings and Capitals begin their best-of-seven series tonight at Joe Louis Arena. Just don't expect either of them to crumble, not after what both have gone through to reach this point.
SPORTS
June 9, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
One long spring ago, he led a little Southland hockey team on a thrilling ride reaching far beyond the rink, bonding a diverse community with courage and passion. But Ron Wilson's greatest impact here will be felt during the next two weeks. When he is standing behind the bench of the Washington Capitals during the Stanley Cup finals. Reminding Southland sports fans of what we have become. Helpless.
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