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NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 200 federal law enforcement officers will help local police patrol the streets of the nation's capital, and when necessary, arrest those who break local laws. The FBI, National Zoological Park Police and U.S. Defense Protective Service have signed agreements with the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department giving federal officers the authority to patrol areas surrounding their jurisdictions.
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NEWS
July 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials in the nation's capital are trying to borrow thousands of additional police officers for what they believe could be the largest protests since the Vietnam War. The Metropolitan Police Department has recently contacted officials in New York; Baltimore; Charlotte, N.C.; and Philadelphia in an effort to increase its pool of available personnel to help maintain order during the annual meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, set for Oct. 2-3.
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NEWS
October 26, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton on Monday rejected Washington's request for National Guard troops to fight crime in the city, White House aides said, and he urged the city to look to Congress instead for authorization. Washington Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly, in a stunning acknowledgment that crime is out of control on many of the capital's streets, asked Clinton last week to give her the authority to use 125 guardsmen to help the city battle crime.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 200 federal law enforcement officers will help local police patrol the streets of the nation's capital, and when necessary, arrest those who break local laws. The FBI, National Zoological Park Police and U.S. Defense Protective Service have signed agreements with the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department giving federal officers the authority to patrol areas surrounding their jurisdictions.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the possibility of war only hours away, official and unofficial Washington went into a state of high alert Tuesday that was evidenced by tightened security, the laying of last-minute contingency plans and a palpable sense of foreboding. Senior Justice Department officials said the FBI has countered more than five possible terrorist attacks against targets in the United States since Iraq invaded Kuwait in August.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid fears of a terrorist attack, officials took unprecedented security precautions Tuesday as most of the government's top officials and many foreign diplomats gathered in the House chamber to hear President Bush's State of the Union speech. Measures ranging from a dynamite-sniffing device to waves of police and rooftop sharpshooters gave Capitol Hill the look of a combat zone, reflecting tensions over the war in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials in the nation's capital are trying to borrow thousands of additional police officers for what they believe could be the largest protests since the Vietnam War. The Metropolitan Police Department has recently contacted officials in New York; Baltimore; Charlotte, N.C.; and Philadelphia in an effort to increase its pool of available personnel to help maintain order during the annual meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, set for Oct. 2-3.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the House sergeant-at-arms issued a warning that the U.S. Capitol is the "No. 1" target in America for terrorist attack, suddenly every piece of mail, every knock at the door, every pan of lasagna has become suspect. Capitol security will be at its highest level when President Bush delivers his scheduled State of the Union address tonight in the House chamber, according to Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
As Friday's inauguration approaches, Barbara Bush has almost single-handedly packed all the boxes of belongings in the rambling Victorian mansion that serves as the vice presidential residence. She has marked each with a colored dot--red to the White House, yellow to the presidential retreat at Camp David, Md., and blue to the family home at Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The thousands of dignitaries from overseas and across the nation invited to witness today's historic signing of the Mideast peace agreement present an extraordinary protective challenge for government security specialists. Perhaps not since President John F.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton on Monday rejected Washington's request for National Guard troops to fight crime in the city, White House aides said, and he urged the city to look to Congress instead for authorization. Washington Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly, in a stunning acknowledgment that crime is out of control on many of the capital's streets, asked Clinton last week to give her the authority to use 125 guardsmen to help the city battle crime.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno suggested that the Clinton Administration is cool to the idea of deploying National Guard troops in the nation's capital. Reno said federal officials were reviewing Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly's request that Guard members be allowed to serve in police duties in the city, but she stressed the importance of building relationships between local police forces and communities.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The thousands of dignitaries from overseas and across the nation invited to witness today's historic signing of the Mideast peace agreement present an extraordinary protective challenge for government security specialists. Perhaps not since President John F.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid fears of a terrorist attack, officials took unprecedented security precautions Tuesday as most of the government's top officials and many foreign diplomats gathered in the House chamber to hear President Bush's State of the Union speech. Measures ranging from a dynamite-sniffing device to waves of police and rooftop sharpshooters gave Capitol Hill the look of a combat zone, reflecting tensions over the war in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the House sergeant-at-arms issued a warning that the U.S. Capitol is the "No. 1" target in America for terrorist attack, suddenly every piece of mail, every knock at the door, every pan of lasagna has become suspect. Capitol security will be at its highest level when President Bush delivers his scheduled State of the Union address tonight in the House chamber, according to Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the possibility of war only hours away, official and unofficial Washington went into a state of high alert Tuesday that was evidenced by tightened security, the laying of last-minute contingency plans and a palpable sense of foreboding. Senior Justice Department officials said the FBI has countered more than five possible terrorist attacks against targets in the United States since Iraq invaded Kuwait in August.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
People in Washington say they are making ready for Monday's visit by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the usual Washington way: welding manholes shut, declaring a hotel to be a foreign mission, sending out bomb-sniffing dogs, putting out the good towels. In fact, on the eve of the first visit by a Soviet leader since Leonid I. Brezhnev was here in 1973, official Washington professes to be almost bored.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno suggested that the Clinton Administration is cool to the idea of deploying National Guard troops in the nation's capital. Reno said federal officials were reviewing Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly's request that Guard members be allowed to serve in police duties in the city, but she stressed the importance of building relationships between local police forces and communities.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
As Friday's inauguration approaches, Barbara Bush has almost single-handedly packed all the boxes of belongings in the rambling Victorian mansion that serves as the vice presidential residence. She has marked each with a colored dot--red to the White House, yellow to the presidential retreat at Camp David, Md., and blue to the family home at Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
People in Washington say they are making ready for Monday's visit by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the usual Washington way: welding manholes shut, declaring a hotel to be a foreign mission, sending out bomb-sniffing dogs, putting out the good towels. In fact, on the eve of the first visit by a Soviet leader since Leonid I. Brezhnev was here in 1973, official Washington professes to be almost bored.
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