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Washington Monument

October 22, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON - Visitors to Washington have seen the iconic Washington Monument don a blanket of scaffolding while it undergoes repairs from an earthquake. Soon they will see a similar look at the opposite end of the National Mall. For about two years the Capitol dome will be covered with scaffolding while it gets its first complete restoration in more than five decades, starting next month. The project, budgeted at nearly $60 million, is handled by the office of the architect of the Capitol, while the National Park Service oversees the Washington Monument's repairs just more than a mile away.
December 2, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON--Will visitors to the nation's capital still be able to see a skyline that includes the Washington Monument, the U.S. Capitol and other national landmarks if Congress relaxes century-old building height restrictions?  That was perhaps the biggest - and still unresolved - question raised at a congressional hearing Monday on a proposal  to allow taller buildings in the District of Columbia. The hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee highlighted divisions over the issue, with two planning officials taking opposite positions.
July 2, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A counter-terrorism study commissioned by the National Park Service concludes that Washington's monuments, particularly those on the Mall, are vulnerable to terrorist attacks and that the federal police force charged with protecting them is understaffed and poorly funded.
November 16, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The U.S. Secret Service is working to determine whether damage to an exterior window of the White House is linked to a Friday night shooting near the Washington Monument, after bullets were discovered at the presidential mansion Tuesday. The Secret Service's Uniformed Division, Washington's Metropolitan Police Department, the U.S. Park Police and other law enforcement agencies continue a joint effort to locate 21-year-old Oscar Ortega-Hernandez, based on evidence recovered from a vehicle found in the 2300 block of Constitution Avenue near the National Mall on Friday night after reports of shots fired near the Washington Monument.
August 12, 2005 | From the Washington Post
Two very different musical events are planned for the nation's capital next month. On Sept. 11, country singer Clint Black will headline the America Supports You concert in support of the military and the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The concert on the Washington Mall will follow a Freedom Walk, sponsored by the Department of Defense, which will begin at the Pentagon and conclude by the Mall's Reflecting Pool.
July 30, 2000
The Washington Monument is reopening its observation platforms, which have been closed since December 1999--and intermittently before then--as part of a three-year, $10-million renovation. Starting Monday, visitors can again ascend to the 490-foot and 500-foot-high decks of the 555-foot-tall structure, the capital's tallest, for a panoramic city view.
October 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The earthquake-damaged National Cathedral in Washington will reopen to visitors and worshipers Nov. 12 after spending $25 million on initial repairs. Officials at the Episcopal church warn it may take "tens of millions" of dollars more and numerous years to restore and fix the building. An online statement from cathedral officials says the need to stabilize parts of the building, including some towers, was why it took so long to reopen. But this building is used to long construction periods -- it took 80 years to complete after the cornerstone was laid in 1907.  Where will the millions for ongoing repairs come from?
November 23, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
Moeller doesn't expect the height limits to be repealed "because people around the world would protest, just as they would if someone came up and said, 'I want to build a skyscraper along the Champs-Elysees.'" WASHINGTON - It blocked views. It shut out sunlight. The "great size" of the 12-story Cairo apartment building so angered the people of Washington, D.C., back in the 1890s that Congress eventually enacted a law that dramatically shaped the landscape of the nation's capital.
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