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Washington Monument

ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
What's shocking about the escalating debate over the World War II Memorial proposed for the National Mall in Washington isn't its intensity, but that it is raging at all. Designed by Rhode Island architect Friedrich St. Florian, the monument will stand on a prominent section of the 2-mile-long lawn that stretches to the Capitol building, between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument.
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TRAVEL
July 30, 2000
The Washington Monument is reopening its observation platforms, which have been closed since December 1999--and intermittently before then--as part of a three-year, $10-million renovation. Starting Monday, visitors can again ascend to the 490-foot and 500-foot-high decks of the 555-foot-tall structure, the capital's tallest, for a panoramic city view.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | From the Washington Post
The Washington Monument will reopen to the public Monday, restored by a $10-million renovation that has meticulously patched the marble exterior and updated the mechanical systems of the 115-year-old icon. No ceremony is planned, but the National Park Service is expecting a large turnout. "We are turning the monument back over to the American people," said Vikki Keys, a deputy superintendent who has overseen the three-year restoration. "It's their monument."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2000
While Christopher Knight's commentary on the proposed World War II memorial being placed on the site of the present Rainbow Pool exposes some of the politics that may have played into the site selection process (what a shocker), his article has more invective and hyperbole than rational thought on why it's a bad location for the memorial ("Damage to a Prime Piece of Real Estate," July 19). Anyone who has walked the length of the National Mall between the Washington Monument and Lincoln Memorial knows what a lonely, empty space of land it is. The proposed WWII memorial is aesthetically well-suited to the location and vice versa, and is in keeping with the existing Washington architecture (unlike the Vietnam War Memorial, which nonetheless has become a cultural touchstone cherished by the public and art critics alike)
NEWS
July 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The nation's capital offered a preview of the $10-million restoration of the Washington Monument. Along with panoramic views of the capital, a few privileged visitors inside the 555-foot monument saw a new floor and glass protection from graffiti at the 500-foot level, the highest reachable point for the public. The level just below includes a new set of interpretive exhibits. The restoration consists largely of repairing the massive outside stones and repointing the mortar between them.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A counter-terrorism study commissioned by the National Park Service concludes that Washington's monuments, particularly those on the Mall, are vulnerable to terrorist attacks and that the federal police force charged with protecting them is understaffed and poorly funded.
TRAVEL
June 18, 2000 | WASHINGTON POST
The Washington Monument will not open during the Fourth of July weekend, spoiling what was expected to be the centerpiece of this year's observance of the holiday, and may be closed until the end of the summer, according to the National Park Service. A celebration of the restoration had been in the works for more than two years for the Fourth of July weekend, Mall Superintendent Arnold Goldstein said, but he added that the holiday observance won't include a public viewing of the $9.
TRAVEL
December 5, 1999 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Washington Monument, which is undergoing a $9-million-plus renovation, will be closed to visitors beginning Monday, officials said. It is expected to reopen in the spring or later. The capital's tallest structure at more than 555 feet, the monument has been swathed in scaffolding and closed twice for four-month periods since work started in 1998. During the latest and final closure, two observation platforms will be refurbished, new exhibits installed and the elevator system improved.
TRAVEL
March 28, 1999
While the Washington Monument remains swathed in scaffolding, visitors there can visit a temporary exhibit that reviews George Washington's life and the monument's history and re-creates the view of D.C. from atop the tower.
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