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January 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Recently in Fargo, N.D., moviegoers had a choice among "Aliens vs. Predator," "The Great Debaters" -- and "Macbeth," live from New York's Metropolitan Opera. Murder, mayhem, romance -- the plot elements of Verdi's opera were packing 'em in at about 600 theaters across North America, Europe, Japan and Australia. It's all part of a marketing strategy by the Met's general manager, Peter Gelb, to attract a new, younger audience.
October 29, 2005 | From Associated Press
For the first time since it was formed 50 years ago, the Washington National Opera will open a new production of George Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" on Saturday, celebrating the 70th anniversary of one of the most successful American works. A Sunday matinee of the show at the Kennedy Center on Nov. 6 will be open to the public on an 18-by-32-foot screen on the National Mall near the Capitol.
May 21, 2009 | Emily Langer, Langer writes for the Washington Post.
Nicholas Maw, a British composer who bucked the fads of modern classical music to return to more traditional melody and who brought William Styron's wrenching novel "Sophie's Choice" to the opera stage, has died. He was 73. Maw died Tuesday at his home in Takoma Park, Md., of complications from dementia and diabetes.
January 16, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
A cluster of star singers will add luster to Los Angeles Opera's 2006-07 season, when James Conlon debuts as the company's music director. Renee Fleming, Patti LuPone, Audra McDonald, Rolando Villazon, Anna Netrebko and company general director Placido Domingo are among the high-powered talents set to appear at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 75 performances of 10 operas, with four of the productions to be conducted by Conlon.
October 12, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Miked, coiffed and dusted with TV makeup, the world's busiest opera tenor was ready for his close-up. "Welcome, Katherine Jenkins, back to the ballroom," barked the "Dancing With the Stars" announcer, "along with the amazing Plácido Domingo, who's just as gorgeous!" It was a balmy October evening at CBS Television City studios on Beverly Boulevard last week, and a surreal mash-up of the famous (Kirstie Alley, Emmitt Smith) and would-be famous were squaring off in an "all-star" edition of ABC's hit dance-contest whack-a-thon.
The capital paid homage this weekend to five artistic legends from around the world, Latvia to California, whose contributions have earned them the highest such honor the nation bestows. Opera star Placido Domingo, who is also artistic director of the Los Angeles Opera, and actor-director Clint Eastwood, who grew up in Depression-era California and studied at Los Angeles City College, were among the recipients of this year's Kennedy Center Honors.
March 14, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Edgar Baitzel, who died Sunday of cancer, was the chief operating officer of Los Angeles Opera. Placido Domingo is the Eli and Edythe Broad general director. The titles reveal a lot. Domingo is L.A. Opera's public face, a celebrity able to woo other celebrities and major donors to the cause of the company. But Baitzel was L.A. Opera. If he had a reputation for being known as Placido's man on the Coast, Baitzel didn't seem to mind.
May 26, 2011
There were no free cars or vacations. No favorite things or makeovers. No celebrity guests on stage — though there were plenty in the audience. The finale of Oprah Winfrey's talk show, taped Tuesday and aired Wednesday, was all about the one thing that made her a billion-dollar success: the unique connection she made with millions of viewers for 25 years. In what she called her "love letter" to fans, she made clear that to her, all those TV friendships went both ways. "Something in me connected with each of you in a way that allowed me to see myself in you and you in me," Winfrey said.
September 14, 2012
Simon Cowell's "The X Factor" has a problem, and it has nothing to do with new judges Britney Spears or Demi Lovato. It's those ratings. The singing show on Fox premiered its second season on Wednesday to shockingly low numbers compared with last year - which was itself considered a ratings disappointment. The two-hour extravaganza averaged 8.5 million viewers, swooning 32% compared with last fall's series premiere. And that's not all. In head-to-head competition during the 8 p.m. hour, Fox lost - in both total viewers and the key 18-to-49 demographic - to NBC's rival singing contest "The Voice" (10.7 million)
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