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May 28, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Mike Sager tells it, the letter arrived 18 months ago, written by Janet Cooke in her choolteacher hand. The proposal: that he, as her former boyfriend and Washington Post colleague, tell her story at last. Before the 12,000-word piece even surfaced in the June issue of GQ, Hollywood jumped in head-first. In a May 16 bidding war, TriStar Pictures committed a whopping $1.6 million for the movie rights, payable in full when principal photography begins.
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NATIONAL
July 31, 2008 | James Rainey
The Washington Post published a smart, thorough takedown Wednesday of the baseless charge that Barack Obama spurned a visit with wounded troops because he couldn't turn the trip into a public relations coup. Reporters Michael D. Shear and Dan Balz showed that Obama never planned to take the media to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, putting the lie to charges from John McCain that the Democrat was on the prowl for a cheap photo op.
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BUSINESS
September 10, 1993
Katharine Graham has stepped down as chairwoman of the board of the Washington Post Co. but continues as chairwoman of the executive committee, the company said Thursday. Her son Donald Graham, who had been president, took over as chairman of the board and continues as chief executive, a position he has held since May, 1991. He is also publisher of the Washington Post newspaper. The company said Alan Spoon was elected president and will continue as chief operating officer.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2008 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The Washington Post dominated the 92nd Pulitzer Prizes for journalism Monday, winning six, including the prestigious public service award for its series exposing substandard conditions at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The Post received honors for coverage of topics including private security contractors in Iraq, a violin virtuoso's incongruous (and mostly overlooked) performance in a Washington subway station, and Vice President Dick Cheney's sub rosa exercise of executive power.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
Washington Post Co. said Wednesday that it has joined with American Personal Communications Inc. to develop a new pocket-sized, wireless telephone service for the Washington area. Maryland-based AMC is the general partner in the limited partnership, which expects to begin testing an experimental phone system by year-end and be fully operational by the end of 1991, the companies said.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Washington Post Plans Format Changes: The Washington Post will trim the size of its pages by about an inch in length and width when its new printing presses come fully into operation at the end of 1998, Publisher Donald E. Graham has told Wall Street analysts. The changes will make the Post the same length as most major American newspapers and an inch narrower than most are today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The National Endowment for the Arts said Tuesday that a series of meetings Friday through Sunday of its 24-member advisory board would be open to the public as a result of a court suit filed by four news organizations. The announcement that the meeting of the National Council on the Arts would be open for the first time in its 25-year history was made by NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer. Frohnmayer said that the decision was made after a suit was filed Monday morning in U.S.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angry federal judge excoriated the press Tuesday and confined the John M. Poindexter trial jury to a hotel at night after reporters contacted two jurors by phone. The Washington Post acknowledged that one of its reporters had contacted juror Leroy Witherspoon to try to set up a time when he could be interviewed after the trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON
The Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Philadelphia Inquirer on Monday sued the National Endowment for the Arts and its advisory board to force them to open a series of upcoming meetings concerning a number of potentially controversial grants. The council voted at its May meeting to open future discussions of grant deliberations to the press and public.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Washington Post named Katharine Weymouth its publisher Thursday, restoring a member of the Graham family to the position after a seven-year hiatus. The newspaper also said it would offer voluntary buyouts to employees next month, the third such round since 2003 and the latest sign of contraction in the newspaper industry. Weymouth, 41, vice president of advertising since 2005, is the granddaughter of Katharine Graham, publisher during the Post's famed investigation of the Watergate scandal.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2006 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
A conservative blogger on the Washington Post's website resigned Friday following allegations that he repeatedly had plagiarized material that appeared under his byline in earlier articles. Washingtonpost.com hired Ben Domenech just three days earlier to widen the ideological spectrum of its online commentary. But liberal bloggers objected that he was unqualified and extreme -- for example, he labeled civil rights icon Coretta Scott King a "communist."
NATIONAL
November 17, 2005 | Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge held a Washington Post reporter in civil contempt Wednesday and instructed him to seek waivers from confidential sources so he could testify about their discussions in an ongoing civil case brought by a former nuclear engineer who claims his privacy was violated during a 1999 criminal investigation. U.S. District Judge Rosemary M. Collyer ordered Walter Pincus to contact his sources and comply with the court's orders within 48 hours.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2005 | From Washington Post
Journalist Bob Woodward testified under oath Monday in the CIA leak case that a senior administration official told him about CIA operative Valerie Plame and her position at the agency nearly a month before her identity was publicly disclosed. In a deposition that lasted more than two hours, Woodward told Special Prosecutor Patrick J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2001 | SCOTT SONNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The outcry over a national magazine article dubbing Battle Mountain the "armpit of America" cost a local newspaper editor her job and stunned the article's author, who insists he's fond of the rural Nevada mining town. Lorrie Baumann, former editor of the Battle Mountain Bugle, said she was fired after local merchants outraged over her cooperation with the Washington Post Magazine threatened to pull advertising from the twice-weekly, 1,700-circulation newspaper.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than 20 years, Katharine Graham, head of the Washington Post and grande dame of American journalism, proudly displayed in her office the mechanical wringer from an old washing machine. It was a reminder that life entails risks--and that taking those risks can lead to greatness. During the early days of Watergate, when the Post labored almost alone to expose the improper and illegal actions that eventually forced President Richard M.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | The Washington Post
Washington Post Magazine reporter Juan Williams said Friday that the newspaper has disciplined him for what he called "wrong" and "inappropriate" verbal conduct toward female staff members, and he apologized to his colleagues. In an open letter to the newsroom, Williams said: "It pained me to learn during the investigation that I had offended some of you.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1988 | From Reuters
The largest union at the Washington Post filed a class-action lawsuit against the newspaper Wednesday, charging systematic discrimination against women, blacks, Hispanics and other minority groups as well as employees over age 40. The complaint was filed with the District of Columbia Office of Human Rights, an administrative agency with broad investigative and prosecutorial powers.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Florida voters who spoiled their ballots because they punched more than one presidential candidate were three times as likely to have included Vice President Al Gore as one of their choices as George W. Bush, a Washington Post analysis has found. A review of computerized records for 2.7 million votes in eight of Florida's largest counties offers new details of how voters erred.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling that could shape how copyright laws are applied in cyberspace, a federal judge on Monday rejected a conservative Web site's position that posting articles copied without permission from major newspapers is legally protected. The preliminary ruling, delivered in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, stems from a copyright infringement suit filed last year by Los Angeles Times and Washington Post newspapers against Freerepublic.
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