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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The Washington Project for the Arts, which last year hung the Robert Mapplethorpe photography show over which a Cincinnati museum was recently indicted, said Tuesday it would strike a key phrase from an anti-obscenity pledge required to qualify for a $50,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The Washington Project for the Arts, which last year hung the Robert Mapplethorpe photography show over which a Cincinnati museum was recently indicted, said Tuesday it would strike a key phrase from an anti-obscenity pledge required to qualify for a $50,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House of Representatives subcommittee that will produce legislation to extend the life of the National Endowment for the Arts has scheduled its first and apparently largest hearing on the issue this year for March 5 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu. The hearing, arts endowment officials said Friday, will provide the only opportunity in the process of renewing the endowment's legislative mandate at which endowment officials will be asked to provide testimony.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House of Representatives subcommittee that will produce legislation to extend the life of the National Endowment for the Arts has scheduled its first and apparently largest hearing on the issue this year for March 5 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu. The hearing, arts endowment officials said Friday, will provide the only opportunity in the process of renewing the endowment's legislative mandate at which endowment officials will be asked to provide testimony.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A controversial Robert Mapplethorpe photography exhibit canceled by the Corcoran Gallery of Art has been booked into the Washington Project for the Arts July 21 through Aug. 13, pending resolution of final details. Corcoran officials pulled the exhibit, which includes sadomasochistic and sexual images, to avoid exacerbating a congressional battle over National Endowment for the Arts funding. WPA Director Jock Reynolds is not worried about showing "Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Artists contributing to two exhibits scheduled to appear at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington this season have withdrawn their work because the museum canceled an exhibit by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, a gallery spokeswoman said Wednesday. The two exhibits were designed to survey trends in contemporary art. A third, much larger exhibit involving Soviet and American artists, also is endangered, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1989
Jesse Jackson, viewing for the first time the controversial painting that depicts him as a blond, blue-eyed white man, said Sunday, "It's not the picture that's the insult. It's the reality behind the picture: That's the insult." The portrait, entitled "How Ya Like Me Now?" by artist David Hammons and part of the Washington Project for the Arts "The Blues Aesthetic" exhibition, was placed on a street corner Wednesday evening.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A museum planning to exhibit sexually explicit photographs by the late Robert Mapplethorpe has taken the unusual step of asking a court to decide whether they violate local obscenity laws. The private Contemporary Arts Center hopes to forestall the sheriff's threat to file obscenity charges against the museum when it opens the six-week exhibit April 6.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- The Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art & Design will feature an unusual exhibit Saturday: Chajana denHarder sleeping, or attempting to sleep, all day. The exhibit, named "Sleep," is part of a series of performances, exhibitions and installations organized by the gallery and Washington Project for the Arts on a glass bridge above the entrance to the museum across from the White House. The artist will be on the bridge for seven hours without food, drink, blanket or pillow.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1990 | From the Washington Post
John E. Frohnmayer, chairman of the National Endowment or the Arts, has for the first time rejected a grant that was recommended by a review panel and approved by the NEA's advisory council. Some council members had criticized the project for being political in nature. The veto stirred concerns among some members of the arts community who have been watching to see how the endowment will function after the protracted and bitter struggle over its reauthorization in the last session of Congress.
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