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Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

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NEWS
July 31, 1998 | Associated Press
A man has been sentenced to five years' probation for bilking people out of $13,000 by selling "California Red Superworms" that he claimed ate nuclear waste. Judge George Harrison on Wednesday also ordered Thomas Stanley Huntington to repay his victims. Huntington, 52, of Farmington, pleaded no contest last month to six counts of fraud and one count of issuing a worthless check.
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NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The Energy Department, dealing with twin setbacks in its long effort to deal with Cold War-era radioactive waste, said Tuesday it was stopping construction of a massive plant in South Carolina to handle surplus plutonium and proceeding with an investigation into a leak at a nuclear dump in New Mexico that exposed 13 workers to airborne plutonium. In releasing its fiscal 2015 budget, energy officials said they were stopping construction of the "mixed oxide fuel" plant at the Savannah River site in South Carolina.
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NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins on Thursday ordered his department to go ahead with development of a radioactive waste repository in New Mexico, saying it meets all required environmental laws. The plant will be the country's first central repository for radioactive wastes from nearly a dozen nuclear weapons plants. The wastes will be placed in salt beds 2,150 feet underground. Watkins said the plant near Carlsbad, N.M.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The U.S. Energy Department said Tuesday it had opened an investigation into a leak of radioactive materials at a nuclear burial site near Carlsbad, N.M. The department shut down normal operations last week at its Waste Isolation Pilot Plant after radiation alarms sounded late Friday, when no one was in the underground facility. Officials at the site discounted any effect on human health, saying no radiation had escaped to the surface and no workers were exposed. So far, it is unknown what caused the release of radioactivity inside the repository, built in ancient salt beds 2,150 feet below the surface.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The Energy Department, dealing with twin setbacks in its long effort to deal with Cold War-era radioactive waste, said Tuesday it was stopping construction of a massive plant in South Carolina to handle surplus plutonium and proceeding with an investigation into a leak at a nuclear dump in New Mexico that exposed 13 workers to airborne plutonium. In releasing its fiscal 2015 budget, energy officials said they were stopping construction of the "mixed oxide fuel" plant at the Savannah River site in South Carolina.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The U.S. Energy Department said Tuesday it had opened an investigation into a leak of radioactive materials at a nuclear burial site near Carlsbad, N.M. The department shut down normal operations last week at its Waste Isolation Pilot Plant after radiation alarms sounded late Friday, when no one was in the underground facility. Officials at the site discounted any effect on human health, saying no radiation had escaped to the surface and no workers were exposed. So far, it is unknown what caused the release of radioactivity inside the repository, built in ancient salt beds 2,150 feet below the surface.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
A key contractor involved in the troubled cleanup at the former Hanford, Wash., nuclear weapons complex admitted Tuesday that it had engaged in criminal time card fraud and agreed to pay $18.5 million to settle the allegations. The project, which involves construction of a $13.4-billion treatment plant to process highly radioactive bomb waste, is years behind schedule, has exceeded its original cost estimate and is paralyzed by technical issues that have halted the work. The problems, however, have not dimmed political support for the project, given the threat that about 56 million gallons of radioactive sludge at the site could eventually leak and reach the nearby Columbia River.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How do you warn future generations that the contents of a vast underground nuclear waste repository will remain dangerously radioactive for the next 10,000 years? When Sandia National Laboratories asked 13 experts to wrestle with that question last fall, it was not just an academic exercise. The government has long pondered how to mark the site of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, N. M.
NEWS
June 8, 1998 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This isolated potash mining town in the arid New Mexico range-lands is so hungry for radioactive garbage that it plans to welcome the arrival of the first toxic truckload with street celebrations and ribbon cuttings.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-six miles out in the Eddy County Badlands, among the rattlers, owls, and kangaroo rats, miners have excavated 800,000 tons of salt from a massive formation that has lain undisturbed since the shallow Permian Sea disappeared from the West 225 million years ago.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
A key contractor involved in the troubled cleanup at the former Hanford, Wash., nuclear weapons complex admitted Tuesday that it had engaged in criminal time card fraud and agreed to pay $18.5 million to settle the allegations. The project, which involves construction of a $13.4-billion treatment plant to process highly radioactive bomb waste, is years behind schedule, has exceeded its original cost estimate and is paralyzed by technical issues that have halted the work. The problems, however, have not dimmed political support for the project, given the threat that about 56 million gallons of radioactive sludge at the site could eventually leak and reach the nearby Columbia River.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | Associated Press
A man has been sentenced to five years' probation for bilking people out of $13,000 by selling "California Red Superworms" that he claimed ate nuclear waste. Judge George Harrison on Wednesday also ordered Thomas Stanley Huntington to repay his victims. Huntington, 52, of Farmington, pleaded no contest last month to six counts of fraud and one count of issuing a worthless check.
NEWS
June 8, 1998 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This isolated potash mining town in the arid New Mexico range-lands is so hungry for radioactive garbage that it plans to welcome the arrival of the first toxic truckload with street celebrations and ribbon cuttings.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How do you warn future generations that the contents of a vast underground nuclear waste repository will remain dangerously radioactive for the next 10,000 years? When Sandia National Laboratories asked 13 experts to wrestle with that question last fall, it was not just an academic exercise. The government has long pondered how to mark the site of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, N. M.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins on Thursday ordered his department to go ahead with development of a radioactive waste repository in New Mexico, saying it meets all required environmental laws. The plant will be the country's first central repository for radioactive wastes from nearly a dozen nuclear weapons plants. The wastes will be placed in salt beds 2,150 feet underground. Watkins said the plant near Carlsbad, N.M.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-six miles out in the Eddy County Badlands, among the rattlers, owls, and kangaroo rats, miners have excavated 800,000 tons of salt from a massive formation that has lain undisturbed since the shallow Permian Sea disappeared from the West 225 million years ago.
NEWS
June 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The opening of a controversial nuclear waste storage site near Carlsbad has been postponed because shipments might contain small amounts of other toxic agents. The underground Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, which will accept plutonium-contaminated waste from the nation's temporary storage facilities, was scheduled to receive its first shipment from the Los Alamos National Laboratory nuclear facility on Friday.
NEWS
October 23, 1988
A boxcar filled with low-level radioactive waste was headed back from Idaho to the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant near Denver, three days after Gov. Cecil D. Andrus banned the temporary storage in Idaho of any new shipments. The boxcar had been at a rail yard in the eastern Idaho city of Blackfoot, the last stop before a temporary waste storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.
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