Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWaste Material Disposal
IN THE NEWS

Waste Material Disposal

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They stand, shoulder to shoulder, on the sloping pastures of the Chino valley--thousands and thousands of cows. Painstakingly bred through sophisticated artificial insemination techniques, these bovines--numbering 300,000 in all--are champion milk producers, making the region home to some of the top dairies in the world. But the docile animals pump out something else as well: manure. Mountains of manure. Two tons per cow per year, to be exact. This waste does more than create a smelly mess.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
The Los Angeles City Council has taken steps toward charging waste haulers for the septic-tank waste they dump into the city's sewer system. Last week, the City Council instructed the Bureau of Sanitation to develop a system of fees to charge waste haulers to pay for the cost of treating the waste, some of which comes from outside the city. On Feb.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
A proposal to charge haulers for the septic-tank waste they dump into the city's sewer system is gaining momentum. On Monday, the City Council's Environmental Quality and Waste Management Committee held a public hearing on a city controller proposal to charge haulers for the treatment of the waste they put into the system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
A proposal to charge haulers for the septic-tank waste they dump into the city's sewer system is gaining momentum. On Monday, the City Council's Environmental Quality and Waste Management Committee held a public hearing on a city controller proposal to charge haulers for the treatment of the waste they put into the system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
The city's top financial officer on Wednesday warned that Los Angeles' policy of accepting septic tank waste free of charge is costing sewer customers nearly $2 million a year. In a letter to Mayor Richard Riordan and the City Council, City Controller Rick Tuttle said the city is loosing $1.8 million a year by processing waste from septic tank users in the San Fernando Valley and surrounding cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
The Los Angeles City Council has taken steps toward charging waste haulers for the septic-tank waste they dump into the city's sewer system. Last week, the City Council instructed the Bureau of Sanitation to develop a system of fees to charge waste haulers to pay for the cost of treating the waste, some of which comes from outside the city. On Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was supposed to be a fun day at the beach, but what happened that fateful afternoon last June turned into a nightmare for Jennifer Marer and her family. Marer's 1-year-old son, Joshua, had picked up a used hypodermic syringe from the sand near the Newport Pier and poked the inside of his mouth with it. "We were just walking around, picking up shells, and the next thing I saw was Josh with the syringe in one hand and blood running out of his mouth," said Marer, 28, of Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
The city's top financial officer on Wednesday warned that Los Angeles' policy of accepting septic tank waste free of charge is costing sewer customers nearly $2 million a year. In a letter to Mayor Richard Riordan and the City Council, City Controller Rick Tuttle said the city is loosing $1.8 million a year by processing waste from septic tank users in the San Fernando Valley and surrounding cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was supposed to be a fun day at the beach, but what happened that fateful afternoon last June turned into a nightmare for Jennifer Marer and her family. Marer's 1-year-old son, Joshua, had picked up a used hypodermic syringe from the sand near the Newport Pier and poked the inside of his mouth with it. "We were just walking around, picking up shells, and the next thing I saw was Josh with the syringe in one hand and blood running out of his mouth," said Marer, 28, of Costa Mesa.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They stand, shoulder to shoulder, on the sloping pastures of the Chino valley--thousands and thousands of cows. Painstakingly bred through sophisticated artificial insemination techniques, these bovines--numbering 300,000 in all--are champion milk producers, making the region home to some of the top dairies in the world. But the docile animals pump out something else as well: manure. Mountains of manure. Two tons per cow per year, to be exact. This waste does more than create a smelly mess.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|