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OPINION
November 30, 2012
Re "Tired of L.A.'s urban waste," Nov. 26 It's wrong to call wastewater biosolids "waste. " There's no waste in wastewater, and the faster we look at reusing every aspect of this resource, the better. At the Hyperion Sewage Treatment Plant near LAX, biosolids are carefully cleaned to the highest standards. Gas produced during this process is recovered and utilized to generate electricity. Biosolids are some of the richest fertilizer available - rich in phosphorous and nitrogen worth millions of dollars to farmers.
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NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By David Zucchino
MONCURE, N.C. - While poring over regulatory documents for Duke Energy coal ash ponds, environmentalists at the Waterkeeper Alliance grew suspicious of the way the giant utility was handling the toxic ash waste left over from burning coal. They decided to send up a team in an aircraft to photograph Duke's shuttered Cape Fear coal-burning power plant and ash ponds, tucked into piney woods in this tiny community in central North Carolina. The photos revealed what the Waterkeeper Alliance says is evidence that Duke, the nation's largest electric utility, is deliberately pumping toxic coal ash wastewater from the containment ponds into a canal that eventually feeds into the Cape Fear River, a source of drinking water for downstream cities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Opponents malign it as "toilet to tap. " But a new National Research Council report says that reclaimed water can contribute a growing portion of the nation's drinking water supplies and be as safe as conventional sources. The assessment is especially relevant to Southern California, which has been a pioneer in recharging local aquifers with treated wastewater but still sends most of its runoff and treated water to the Pacific Ocean. A decade ago, public outcry and electoral politics thwarted a Los Angeles plan to partially replenish San Fernando Valley groundwater with recycled supplies.
OPINION
November 30, 2012
Re "Tired of L.A.'s urban waste," Nov. 26 It's wrong to call wastewater biosolids "waste. " There's no waste in wastewater, and the faster we look at reusing every aspect of this resource, the better. At the Hyperion Sewage Treatment Plant near LAX, biosolids are carefully cleaned to the highest standards. Gas produced during this process is recovered and utilized to generate electricity. Biosolids are some of the richest fertilizer available - rich in phosphorous and nitrogen worth millions of dollars to farmers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2008 | Rich Connell, Times Staff Writer
In a conference room atop a downtown Los Angeles tower, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's point man on water conservation was confidently ticking off the protections built into a plan to recycle highly treated sewage effluent into the drinking supply. But when his staff explained that community meetings on the project might not begin until early next year, H. David Nahai quickly grew uneasy. That's too slow, too risky, the Department of Water and Power general manager told his team. "Folks on the street who'll hear about wastewater treatment [may]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2009 | Ruben Vives
Public health officials Wednesday reopened Inner and Outer Cabrillo Beach after determining that 3 million gallons of treated wastewater discharged into Los Angeles Harbor from a nearby treatment plant did not contain harmful chemicals or bacteria. Public health officials closed the beach Tuesday after the Los Angeles City Terminal Treatment Plant accidentally discharged wastewater, which already had been treated for harmful waste products, into the harbor. Officials were concerned that some of the water may have flowed to the public beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2009 | Martha Groves
The great sewer wars of Malibu have finally drawn to a close. Sewers won. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board agreed late Thursday to ban septic systems in central and eastern Malibu, a move that would end years of fierce debate over the wastewater devices still commonly used in one of Southern California's most picturesque and exclusive coastal communities. New septic systems will not be permitted in Malibu and owners of existing systems will have to halt wastewater discharges within a decade.
OPINION
June 17, 2006
Re "EPA Rule Loosened After Oil Chief's Letter to Rove," June 13 The Environmental Protection Agency correctly interpreted the intent of Congress in the recent finalization of the rule to keep storm-water runoff clean near oil drilling sites and construction zones. Since 1987, it has been the law that uncontaminated storm-water discharges from natural gas and oil development activities, including sediment, do not require a specific wastewater permit from the EPA. However, the EPA continued to misinterpret the law, forcing Congress to act in last year's energy bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The city of Solvang has agreed to process the extra sewage generated by the casino that the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians plans to open at the end of the month. The tribe's $1-million-plus water treatment facility will be finished in about a year. Solvang officials agreed to provide up to 40,000 gallons of sewage capacity each day at a one-time cost of about $73,000.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Here's a posting from the "ick" files. Scientsts are now delving into an uncharted environment to study human and other viruses: raw sewage. In a study published Tuesday in the online journal mBio, researchers from the U.S. and Spainfound that untreated human wastewater -- "the effluence of society," they wrote -- contains an incredible diversity of viruses ... and that the vast majority are viruses we hadn't known of before. Click for the abstract . At this point, biologists know of about 3,000 different viruses, representing 84 different viral families -- but they suspect that those known bugs are just the tip of the iceberg.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2012 | By Michael Muskal and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
The injection of wastewater from natural gas drilling into a disposal well probably caused a dozen earthquakes in Ohio, officials said Friday as they announced new regulations to deal with the issue. The findings about the probable cause of the earthquakes, which occurred in the Youngstown area between March and late December 2011, are likely to intensify an increasingly bitter debate about the safety of hydraulic fracturing in states that sit atop natural gas deposits. Hydraulic fracturing injects sand and water laced with chemicals into the earth at high pressure to break apart shale rock formations and free natural gas trapped inside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Opponents malign it as "toilet to tap. " But a new National Research Council report says that reclaimed water can contribute a growing portion of the nation's drinking water supplies and be as safe as conventional sources. The assessment is especially relevant to Southern California, which has been a pioneer in recharging local aquifers with treated wastewater but still sends most of its runoff and treated water to the Pacific Ocean. A decade ago, public outcry and electoral politics thwarted a Los Angeles plan to partially replenish San Fernando Valley groundwater with recycled supplies.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to regulate wastewater discharged by companies producing natural gas from shale formations, including chemically laced water used in a controversial extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing. The EPA's initiative comes as water-intensive natural gas production has spread around the country, raising concerns about the effects on drinking-water supplies. The practice, also known as fracking, involves shooting water infused with chemicals and sand at high pressure into shale formations to unlock reservoirs of natural gas. The EPA will try to determine what to do with water used during fracking, as well as water that is already underground and flows back up the well.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Here's a posting from the "ick" files. Scientsts are now delving into an uncharted environment to study human and other viruses: raw sewage. In a study published Tuesday in the online journal mBio, researchers from the U.S. and Spainfound that untreated human wastewater -- "the effluence of society," they wrote -- contains an incredible diversity of viruses ... and that the vast majority are viruses we hadn't known of before. Click for the abstract . At this point, biologists know of about 3,000 different viruses, representing 84 different viral families -- but they suspect that those known bugs are just the tip of the iceberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2011 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
It started last month when workers at a Paso Robles wastewater treatment plant noticed what appeared to be a giant rodent roaming the facility. The creature eventually swam toward the Salinas River and disappeared from sight, but not before worker Nick Kamp had taken a few photos. He and a co-worker called the California Department of Fish and Game to report what they had seen. Responding wardens used the pictures to confirm that the animal was in fact a capybara — an adult they believe weighs 100 to 120 pounds.
OPINION
December 10, 2010
Since 2007, members of the Achuar tribe, indigenous to Peru's Amazon rain forest, have been fighting to have their class-action suit against Occidental Petroleum tried in the United States. The Achuar allege that over a 30-year period, the Westwood-based oil company dumped millions of gallons of wastewater into their rivers and disposed of waste in unlined pits, sickening people and contaminating the land. The company, they maintain, should be held accountable in California courts. This week the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed, overturning a lower court ruling that said Maynas Carijano vs. Occidental Petroleum should be tried in Peru.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government has given Florida permission to dump more than 500 million gallons of wastewater from an abandoned phosphate plant into the Gulf of Mexico. The Environmental Protection Agency approved the dumping Wednesday after determining that continued heavy rain could cause a wastewater spill at the plant. If the untreated, acidic water reached Tampa Bay, it could cause a massive fish kill, according to environmental reports.
NEWS
June 25, 1992
The City Council has unanimously backed a waste-water management plan that emphasizes small treatment plants and private treatment systems. At a Tuesday night session dedicated exclusively to a 266-page Wastewater Management Study, the council agreed with the report's conclusion that smaller, decentralized systems best suit Malibu's needs and that a large-scale sewer project such as the one proposed by Los Angeles County is not necessary.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Landfills, with the tendency to belch noxious greenhouse gases, have long gotten a bad rap from environmentalists. But now several clean-power technology companies believe waste can be a source of environmentally friendly energy. FlexEnergy, an Irvine company, showed off a pilot generator Thursday that converts previously unusable methane gas seeping from a Riverside County landfill into 100 kilowatts of electricity. That could be used to help run the sprawling landfill operations or light up more than 100 homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall
You have to be a scuba diver to see the difference, but areas of Santa Monica Bay that were historically fouled by sewage discharges are making a strong comeback. The new State of the Bay report notes the revival of bottom-dwelling marine life in the wake of treatment upgrades at the two big wastewater plants that empty into the bay several miles from shore. Diver surveys have documented sea animals and plants on the sea floor "where really it was barren before," said Shelley Luce, executive director of the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission, which issues the report every five years.
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