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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2008
Just wanted to let you know that John Horn's article ["Studio War," Nov. 16] is probably the best succinct explanation of the controversy over "Watchmen" that I've read anywhere. Great job boiling down a very complicated story into something that's easily understandable. Patrick Casey Warwick, R.I. :: My bet is, (if it's ever released) "Watchmen" flops. I'm just an ordinary guy who knows all about Spider-Man, Superman and Batman and never heard of these Watchmen comics. Let's hope Warner Bros.
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NEWS
February 2, 2012
Springsteen concert: The Will Call column in the Feb. 1 Calendar section listed Bruce Springsteen's April 26 concert as playing at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. It is at the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena. "Watchmen": In the Feb. 1 Calendar section, the caption for an illustration accompanying an article about DC Comics' launching a series of prequels to its 1986 "Watchmen" series said that the illustration was from one of the new prequels, "Minutemen. " It was from the original "Watchmen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
On a wintry day here last year, Zack Snyder hunkered down in a dank prison cell, peered between the bars and watched bloodthirsty inmates run riot. All the smoke and screams only made him smile; the fiery cellblock he saw before him looked nearly identical to the one in the hand-drawn pages of "Watchmen," the landmark 1985 graphic novel. The director didn't have to rely on memory -- he had a rolled-up copy of the comic book on the set with him.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Relic Master Book One: The Dark City Catherine Fisher Dial: 372 pp., $16.99 ages 12 and up It's been 10 years since the final book in Catherine Fisher's "Relic Master" series was released in Britain. That was before Fisher wrote "Incarceron," a fantasy novel for young adults, and had a bestseller on her hands stateside. With the beginning of their U.S. publication this month, the Welsh author's acclaimed fantasy "Relic Master" books finally seem poised to capitalize not only on Fisher's bestseller status, but on the strong dystopian trend in current young adult literature, as well as readers' lack of patience for a series to play out. The "Relic Master" quartet is being released rapid fire, with the first book out earlier this month and the subsequent three released monthly through August.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Greg Braxton
Jackie Earle Haley, the former child star now being applauded for his gallery of memorably dark characters, is finally getting a chance to lighten up. Haley costars in Fox's "Human Target" as Guerrero, a mysterious hired hand always one step ahead of everyone around him, especially the bad guys. It's a return to more humorous parts for Haley, 48, who in the 1970s starred in hits such as "The Bad News Bears" and "Breaking Away" before a lack of more mature roles prompted him to drop out of Hollywood.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
Springsteen concert: The Will Call column in the Feb. 1 Calendar section listed Bruce Springsteen's April 26 concert as playing at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. It is at the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena. "Watchmen": In the Feb. 1 Calendar section, the caption for an illustration accompanying an article about DC Comics' launching a series of prequels to its 1986 "Watchmen" series said that the illustration was from one of the new prequels, "Minutemen. " It was from the original "Watchmen.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2006
"Phone, Cable May Charge Dot-Coms That Want to Race Along the Internet," (April 9) touched upon a very disturbing idea: If the companies that own the telecommunication networks are allowed to control the information that passes through these networks, they become the Internet's watchmen. But who will watch the watchmen? The worst-case scenario: Information would be in the hands of the few, which would be in direct violation of the principle of egalitarianism that's become the Internet's central dogma.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Relic Master Book One: The Dark City Catherine Fisher Dial: 372 pp., $16.99 ages 12 and up It's been 10 years since the final book in Catherine Fisher's "Relic Master" series was released in Britain. That was before Fisher wrote "Incarceron," a fantasy novel for young adults, and had a bestseller on her hands stateside. With the beginning of their U.S. publication this month, the Welsh author's acclaimed fantasy "Relic Master" books finally seem poised to capitalize not only on Fisher's bestseller status, but on the strong dystopian trend in current young adult literature, as well as readers' lack of patience for a series to play out. The "Relic Master" quartet is being released rapid fire, with the first book out earlier this month and the subsequent three released monthly through August.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2008 | Associated Press
In a batch of 20 new episodes, Charlie Brown and the gang have been brought back to animated life, much in the style of their classic holiday TV specials. But this time Lucy, Snoopy and the others have been remade for the Web in 3-to-4-minute videos taken directly from classic 1964 comic strips. The videos, produced with Flash animation, were made by Warner Bros.' Motion Comics, which has previously brought strips of Batman, Superman and Watchmen to animated life. The "Peanuts" project was done with the involvement of the Charles Schulz family and estate, which monitored the adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2008
OK, it's time to take the plunge and actually read a graphic novel. But where to start? Gerard Way, the lead singer of My Chemical Romance and writer of the acclaimed "The Umbrella Academy" comic, has 10 suggestions. "Watchmen," by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons (DC, $19.99). Graphic novel that changed the way I thought about superheroes and mainstream comics. I often refer to "Watchmen" as a gateway drug. "The Dark Knight Returns," by Frank Miller (DC, $14.99). A total deconstruction . . . this is Batman at 50 years old, at his grittiest, his darkest, and it paved the way for a whole generation of "darker heroes."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Greg Braxton
Jackie Earle Haley, the former child star now being applauded for his gallery of memorably dark characters, is finally getting a chance to lighten up. Haley costars in Fox's "Human Target" as Guerrero, a mysterious hired hand always one step ahead of everyone around him, especially the bad guys. It's a return to more humorous parts for Haley, 48, who in the 1970s starred in hits such as "The Bad News Bears" and "Breaking Away" before a lack of more mature roles prompted him to drop out of Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2009 | Pete Metzger
When the Wii took America by storm in 2006, it came bundled with Wii Sports, a collection of five games that changed how gamers played sports. While its sequel, Wii Sports Resort, won't change anything per se -- even with the included Wii Motion Plus dongle that enhances the sensitivity of the Wii controllers -- it is one of the best and most diverse Wii titles to date. There is something for everyone in this package, which hit store shelves Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2009 | Noel Murray
Watchmen Warner, $28.98/$34.98; Blu-ray, $35.99 Zack Snyder's big-screen version of Alan Moore's beloved graphic novel "Watchmen" gets the broad strokes right, telling a sexy, blood-spattered story about a band of discredited heroes who reunite to solve the murder of one of their own. But despite some stunning visual effects and a few bravura sequences, the "Watchmen" movie comes off a little flat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009
Quantum of Solace MGM, $29.99/$34.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 Picking up where "Casino Royale" left off, the latest James Bond adventure sees the suave secret agent dealing not with cartoonish supervillains but with the more morally ambiguous world of macroeconomics and geopolitics. The novelty of this down-to-earth, humanly flawed Bond has worn off a little, and it hurts that director Marc Forster doesn't come up with much in the way of memorable set pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"Watchmen" dropped a precipitous 68% this weekend, grossing $17.8 million after doing $55.2 million in its opening weekend. Forget about Humpty Dumpty -- a real human being might end up in the emergency room after a drop like that (the movie fell 50% overseas as well). Only in Hollywood could anyone put a smiley face on that kind of fall. Sure enough, in Variety's box-office story Monday, Jeff Goldstein (no relation), Warner Bros.'
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day
In a special-effects bonanza such as "Watchmen," a single effect like Dr. Manhattan's eerie blue look could easily be lost in the tumult of nuclear explosions, flying ships, Martian palaces and Antarctic lairs. But with more than 300 shots totaling about 38 minutes of screen time, the effect had to be executed to perfection. Since digitally adding the blue glow to the superhero character played by Billy Crudup in post-production would be prohibitively expensive, John "D.J."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2005
YOU can have your Batman, your Superman, your Aquaman and all the other super-dupermen (and women) one wants represented at the current Museum of Contemporary Art exhibit on American comics, but the absence of Carl Barks is inexcusable and insupportable ["Serious Respect for the Funnies," by Alex Chun, Nov. 12, and "Serious About Comics," by Geoff Boucher, Nov. 17]. Barks' erudite inventions for Walt Disney Comics, from Uncle Scrooge McDuck to the city and environment and fully realized citizens of Duckburg, USA, had a profound and positive influence on generations of American children and artists, including George Lucas and Steven Spielberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | Geoff Boucher and John Horn
MALIN AKERMAN GETTING IN ON THE ACTION The tag line for March film "Watchmen" is "Who watches the Watchmen?" But the better question may be: "Who could keep their eyes off of Malin Akerman?" The superhero epic has a glowing blue man who grows to skyscraper size, but its most memorable image may be Akerman's Silk Spectre tearing through a mob of convicts during a fiery prison riot -- all while in stiletto heels. The 30-year-old is more than a curvy action figure; she caught the eye of moviegoers in "27 Dresses," showed ribald bravery playing opposite Ben Stiller in "The Heartbreak Kid" remake and won praise in HBO's "The Comeback."
BUSINESS
March 13, 2009 | Claudia Eller
Everybody is talking about "Watchmen." Now if only more people would watch it. Amid a flurry of anticipation and hype, director Zack Snyder's superhero epic opened last weekend with $55.2 million in U.S. ticket sales -- a solid but less-than-blockbuster debut for a movie that Warner Bros. and its partners will have spent $200 million-plus to make and market. The question now is whether all the Internet and water cooler chatter will translate into footsteps into the theaters this weekend.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2009 | David Pierson
Dressed in skinny black jeans and rocker T-shirts, teenagers Raven McGee and Charles Valencia were perusing comic books at a store in Glendale, capping what the two friends considered a perfect Saturday after seeing the superhero blockbuster "Watchmen." So-called fanboys of the genre, such as McGee and Valencia, helped propel the action film's weekend box-office domination with estimated ticket sales of $55.7 million, the biggest opening of any film this year.
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