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NATIONAL
August 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Tropical Storm Fay brought some good news to the state's parched Everglades and Lake Okeechobee -- lots of water. The lake rose more than 2 feet in a single week. That's about 288 billion gallons, equivalent to about 84 days' worth of water for South Florida.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Small tsunami waves and other unusual "water movements" arrived on the California coast Wednesday following an 8.2 earthquake that struck Chile's northern coast. Although officials stressed that no tsunami warning had been issued for California or the West Coast, the abnormal wave heights, tide fluctuations and current changes may have surprised boaters, they said. The first waves to strike California that were connected to Tuesday night's South American earthquake may have hit La Jolla about 4 a.m., said Bill Knight, an oceanographer with the National Tsunami Warning Center based in Alaska.
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NATIONAL
April 6, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Easter is Sunday, which means many people need to learn how to properly hard-boil an egg. Emphasis on " properly . " You probably already know how to make hard-boiled eggs the wrong way: Boil the eggs until the kitchen gets stinky with that sulfur-y, rotten-egg smell and you're left with rubbery whites and a distasteful green ring around the yolk. But fear not. This is the Easter when you learn how to properly make hard-boiled eggs, courtesy of the L.A. Times Test Kitchen and Food Editor Russ Parsons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011
'Water for Elephants' MPAA rating: PG-13 for moments of intense violence and sexual content Running time: 2 hours, 2 minutes Playing: In general release
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1988
Caltrans workers will pass by a broken sprinkler with water shooting on the freeway and do nothing to fix it. Schools will take up to two months to fix a broken pipe with water running over the curb and down the gutter 24 hours a day. When the cities, counties and state start to conserve water, then I will do the same. B.C. BERTONE Whittier
FOOD
September 1, 2011
Rose water granita Total time: 15 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: 6 to 8 1 (750-milliliter) bottle Prosecco 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup raspberries 1 tablespoon rose water 1. In a large bowl, stir together the Prosecco and sugar until the sugar is dissolved. 2. Into a medium bowl, push the raspberries through a strainer to remove any seeds. You should have a scant one-fourth cup purée. 3. Whisk the raspberry purée in with the Prosecco, then whisk in the rosewater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
One lane on North Cahuenga Boulevard in the Hollywood Hills remained closed Thursday morning after a water main ruptured and spilled thousands of gallons of water into the neighborhood. The pipe broke just before 8 p.m. Wednesday in the 2200 block of North Cahuenga Boulevard, north of the 101 Freeway, and flooded the underground garage of an apartment complex, one apartment unit and streets. Thirty people remained without water Thursday, and service was expected to be restored by the afternoon, said Los Angeles Department of Water and Power spokeswoman Carol Tucker.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
It is, theoretically, a really cool gimmick. If you were in the Midwest when temperatures plunged to about 30 degrees below zero this week, it was probably cold enough to throw boiling water into the air and watch it freeze in midair. An ABC News reporter did just that on the air . So did a pair of TV meteorologists in Lexington, Ky. "All you have to do is bundle up, get some boiling water, and throw it out in the subzero temperatures and see what happens," one broadcaster in North Dakota said . "Threw a pot of boiling water in the air. Kids thought it was awesome," Jason DeRusha, a WCCO-TV anchor in Minneapolis, tweeted to his followers on Sunday . "Do it, people.
FOOD
April 14, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: I am eagerly and desperately looking to replicate the most delicious, amazing salad I have ever had. My fiancé and I are regulars at the Tender Greens in Culver City, and we finally tried its best dish on meatless Monday: the happy vegan. It successfully combines the tastiest health foods such as red quinoa salad, green hummus and farro, with toasted hazelnuts, all on one plate. Please help me with the recipe! Jessica Zi Los Angeles Dear Jessica: The happy vegan is a combination of several smaller salads, and Tender Greens was happy to share its recipes, which we've adapted below.
OPINION
March 30, 2014
Re "The water revolution we need," Opinion, March 28 It's deceptive to say that agriculture uses 75% of "the water used in the state" without adding "for human use. " According to the California State Water Plan, urban use accounts for 11% and agriculture 41%; environmental use accounts for 48%. This is the developed water supply that can be managed and controlled. Agricultural water efficiency has never been greater. Farmers have invested billions of dollars in drip irrigation and other efficiency technologies and produce 85.4% more food and fiber per acre-foot of water than they did in 1967.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
If you're in the market for an alternative to plastic or metal water bottles, here are a few options: Lifefactory Flip Top Holds 22 ounces; weighs 19 ounces unfilled, $24.99 The cap at the mouthpiece is attached but flips back for sipping. The bottles are slightly curved, making them easy to hold. www.lifefactory.com/catalog/flip-cap CamelBak Eddy Holds 24 ounces; weighs 18.4 ounces unfilled, $24.95 Made with CamelBak's signature bite valve: Just bite and sip; no tipping required.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
The big guy in the water pitcher-filter market has practically become a common name, like Kleenex. But even Brita's most ardent fans might agree that those plastic containers aren't dinner party elegant. There's a new player hoping to fill that spot: Soma, a glass carafe with a plastic filter that sits inside it. The filter, which lasts two months, is biodegradable, made of coconut shell, silk and food-based plastic, the company says. It costs $49 with one filter; additional filters, automatically mailed to subscribers, cost $12.99.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
LOS ALGODONES, Mexico - Osvel Hinojosa knew that an infusion of water would bring the Colorado River delta back to life. But in just a few days, a U.S.-Mexican experiment to revive the delta environment has exceeded his expectations. The water is running deeper, faster and wider than anticipated in a channel that was once bone-dry. Hinojosa has spotted hawks, egrets and ospreys flying above the newly flowing water. He's even seen beavers. "It's just amazing to see that we can recover the river and see it alive again," said Hinojosa, water and wetlands program director at Pronatura Noroeste, a Mexican water conservation group.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By Wade Graham
This year's drought has thrown California into a sudden tizzy, a crisis of snowpack measurements, fish-versus-people arguments and controversial cuts in water deliveries. But in reality, crisis is the permanent state of water affairs in the Golden State - by design, because our institutions keep it that way. California has 1,400 major dams, thousands of miles of aqueducts and pumps so powerful they lift water nearly 2,000 feet over the Tehachapis. The state uses enough water in an average year to support, in theory, 318 million Californians (and their lawns and dishwashers)
OPINION
March 26, 2014
Re “ Drying up the delta ,” March 23 Bettina Boxall's front-page article - accompanied by striking photos of flooded fields being fed by scarce water from sources that also supply our vanishing Northern California delta - is all the testimony that we should need to impress upon us the grotesque priorities that we are still following in allocating our state's most critical natural resource. Those priorities mean that we are growing rice for shipment to Asia by flooding an expanding desert landscape in the heart of the Central Valley, while millions of Californians are experiencing a disastrous water shortage and we deprive our most productive growers of reasonable access to water.
SCIENCE
July 16, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A new study of the landscape around the city of Tikal in the Peten rainforest of Guatemala shows that Maya of the Classic period -- from about AD 250 to 800 -- used Stone Age technology to build sophisticated water management systems that allowed the city's population to survive and even thrive during the droughts that frequently plagued the region's summers. The simple techniques that were used could provide lessons for modern-day farmers living in the region, the researchers reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014
Dave Brockie Frontman for heavy metal GWAR Dave Brockie, 50, who as "Oderus Urungus" fronted the alien-costumed heavy metal band GWAR during graphic and fake-blood-soaked stage shows for more than three decades, was found dead Sunday evening at his home in Richmond, Va. Detectives currently don't suspect foul play, according to Richmond police spokeswoman Dionne Waugh, and the medical examiner's office will determine cause of...
OPINION
March 25, 2014
Re "Energy boom may augur a new export era," March 23 Every dollar invested to expand the use of fossil fuels here or abroad is a bad investment. Spending a single penny or drilling any new wells to find more dirty energy is wrongheaded. We have more fossil fuels in the ground than we can afford to burn. To avoid a climate catastrophe, most of that dirty energy must remain where it is. Talking about gas as if it were the 1970s is not productive. We must go green by passing a revenue-neutral carbon tax. Our country can be off fossil fuels within the next few decades - or even sooner once entrepreneurs and innovators understand that the days of dirty energy are over.
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