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NEWS
December 26, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a cotton farm scraped from a desert plain here between Phoenix and Tucson, Carla Lacey and Vernon Prock have outlasted boll weevils, white flies, tightening credit and plummeting crop prices. But even Lacey's accounting skills and Prock's experience in agricultural management may be overmatched by the problem that now threatens to drive their farm--and hundreds of others that have survived in the sizzling Sonora Desert--out of business within two years. A $3.
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OPINION
May 21, 2010
Two of a kind Re "Senate candidate under fire," and "GOP lawmaker resigns over affair with aide," May 19 How appropriate that the revelations about two more dishonest politicians should appear side by side on the same page. We have Democratic Senate hopeful Richard Blumenthal, who confesses to having "misspoken" about his service record "on a few occasions." Then there's Indiana Rep. Mark Souder, who righteously preached celibacy and fidelity while cheating on his wife.
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NEWS
July 6, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. has decided to defer action on a request by the Peabody Coal Co. for a long-term operating permit for its Black Mesa coal mine, handing a victory to the Hopi and Navajo tribes that blame the company for diminished ground water supplies in the region. The tribes contend that a 250-mile coal slurry pipeline, which draws 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sam Goddard, 86, a former governor of Arizona who helped secure water for the region in his two years in office, died Wednesday in Phoenix, according to a spokeswoman for his son, Arizona Atty. Gen. Terry Goddard. The cause of death was not announced, but the former governor had been in hospice care with complications from a broken hip. Goddard was Arizona's 12th governor, serving from 1965 to 1967.
NEWS
November 10, 1988
Colorado River water not being used in southern Nevada and Arizona will go to California next year to help alleviate drought conditions, officials said. The three states annually share in 7.5 million acre-feet of Colorado River water, with 4.4 million acre-feet going to California, 2.8 million acre-feet to Arizona and 300,000 acre-feet to southern Nevada. Gerald Edwards, chief engineer for Nevada's Colorado River Commission, said that only about 110,000 acre-feet is consumed in the region.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could save hundreds of farms from bankruptcy, the U.S. Department of the Interior has tentatively agreed to give Central Arizona Project customers an additional year to begin repaying $2.3 billion for the water delivery system. The announcement follows a year of intense haggling among agencies including the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1988 | Compiled by Times Science Writer Thomas Maugh II from research presented at the meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science in Boston last week
Archeologists have discovered an ancient canal north of Tucson, Ariz., that may have been a major source of drinking water for a now-vanished society of Native Americans called the Hohokam. Paul R. Fish and his colleagues at the University of Arizona said that the six-mile long structure carried water from the Santa Cruz River to a Hohokam village called the Marana Platform Site.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hatched during the Nixon era, billed as a sure-fire technological fix to a problem that had strained the country's relations with Mexico to the breaking point. The trouble was the Colorado River. Fouled by agricultural runoff in the United States, the river had become so choked with salts that it was poisoning crops on Mexican farms near the end of its 1,400-mile run from the Rockies to the sea.
OPINION
May 21, 2010
Two of a kind Re "Senate candidate under fire," and "GOP lawmaker resigns over affair with aide," May 19 How appropriate that the revelations about two more dishonest politicians should appear side by side on the same page. We have Democratic Senate hopeful Richard Blumenthal, who confesses to having "misspoken" about his service record "on a few occasions." Then there's Indiana Rep. Mark Souder, who righteously preached celibacy and fidelity while cheating on his wife.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Thirty-six undocumented Mexican immigrants were discovered wandering without food or water in the desert north of here on Saturday, after two of them came to a ranch to ask for help, authorities said. The 35 men and one woman, who officials said had been walking four days since they crossed the border, were reported to be generally in good condition.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a cotton farm scraped from a desert plain here between Phoenix and Tucson, Carla Lacey and Vernon Prock have outlasted boll weevils, white flies, tightening credit and plummeting crop prices. But even Lacey's accounting skills and Prock's experience in agricultural management may be overmatched by the problem that now threatens to drive their farm--and hundreds of others that have survived in the sizzling Sonora Desert--out of business within two years. A $3.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could save hundreds of farms from bankruptcy, the U.S. Department of the Interior has tentatively agreed to give Central Arizona Project customers an additional year to begin repaying $2.3 billion for the water delivery system. The announcement follows a year of intense haggling among agencies including the U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hatched during the Nixon era, billed as a sure-fire technological fix to a problem that had strained the country's relations with Mexico to the breaking point. The trouble was the Colorado River. Fouled by agricultural runoff in the United States, the river had become so choked with salts that it was poisoning crops on Mexican farms near the end of its 1,400-mile run from the Rockies to the sea.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. has decided to defer action on a request by the Peabody Coal Co. for a long-term operating permit for its Black Mesa coal mine, handing a victory to the Hopi and Navajo tribes that blame the company for diminished ground water supplies in the region. The tribes contend that a 250-mile coal slurry pipeline, which draws 1.
NEWS
November 10, 1988
Colorado River water not being used in southern Nevada and Arizona will go to California next year to help alleviate drought conditions, officials said. The three states annually share in 7.5 million acre-feet of Colorado River water, with 4.4 million acre-feet going to California, 2.8 million acre-feet to Arizona and 300,000 acre-feet to southern Nevada. Gerald Edwards, chief engineer for Nevada's Colorado River Commission, said that only about 110,000 acre-feet is consumed in the region.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Thirty-six undocumented Mexican immigrants were discovered wandering without food or water in the desert north of here on Saturday, after two of them came to a ranch to ask for help, authorities said. The 35 men and one woman, who officials said had been walking four days since they crossed the border, were reported to be generally in good condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sam Goddard, 86, a former governor of Arizona who helped secure water for the region in his two years in office, died Wednesday in Phoenix, according to a spokeswoman for his son, Arizona Atty. Gen. Terry Goddard. The cause of death was not announced, but the former governor had been in hospice care with complications from a broken hip. Goddard was Arizona's 12th governor, serving from 1965 to 1967.
NEWS
May 12, 1986 | BILL CURRY, Times Staff Writer
With toxic agricultural and industrial chemicals threatening its treasured desert water supply, the state of Arizona has adopted what may well be the nation's toughest law to protect underground water. The law, which places tight restrictions on interests that have long dominated Arizona, reflects a growing environmental consciousness in the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1988 | Compiled by Times Science Writer Thomas Maugh II from research presented at the meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science in Boston last week
Archeologists have discovered an ancient canal north of Tucson, Ariz., that may have been a major source of drinking water for a now-vanished society of Native Americans called the Hohokam. Paul R. Fish and his colleagues at the University of Arizona said that the six-mile long structure carried water from the Santa Cruz River to a Hohokam village called the Marana Platform Site.
NEWS
May 12, 1986 | BILL CURRY, Times Staff Writer
With toxic agricultural and industrial chemicals threatening its treasured desert water supply, the state of Arizona has adopted what may well be the nation's toughest law to protect underground water. The law, which places tight restrictions on interests that have long dominated Arizona, reflects a growing environmental consciousness in the state.
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