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Water Cleanup

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NEWS
April 28, 1991
Representatives from industry, environmental groups, water agencies and the state on Thursday will consider the question: Who should pay for the multimillion-dollar cleanup of San Gabriel Valley's contaminated ground-water supply. The forum, the first in a series of three during the next two months on regional water pollution, will be at the Baldwin Park City Council Chambers, 14403 E. Pacific Ave., at 7:30 p.m. The League of Women Voters, Sierra Club, Superfund Working Information Group and U.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Facing overwhelming opposition to a proposed parcel fee to clean up storm water pollution, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors deferred a vote to place it on the ballot. The proposed fee would be levied on all property owners within the county's flood control district, raising an estimated $290 million a year to help cities and the county deal with widespread water quality issues stemming from polluted storm water and urban runoff - and the resulting threat of fines and litigation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1996
Living up to the ecologically friendly responsibilities imposed on them by the federal Superfund program, Crown City Plating Co. and Hermetic Seal Corp. will host a dedication ceremony today for their ground water cleanup project. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) is scheduled to speak at the 11 a.m. event in front of the plating company's El Monte plant at 4350 Temple City Blvd.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Robert Greene
So in addition to the taxes that every L.A. voter sees on Tuesday's ballot -- Propositions 30 , 38 and 39 , and Measure J -- you now also know about the parcel taxes in the Santa Monica Mountains area and the coming countywide parcel tax for storm water cleanup. Sometimes they show up at the ballot box, sometimes in the mail. But there's one more for you. Residents of part of downtown Los Angeles will get mail ballots next week asking them to vote on whether to tax property owners to repay bonds that would be sold to bring streetcars back to town after an absence of more than half a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1999
The Cuyahoga River, so polluted in 1969 that it caught fire, became a symbol of the deplorable condition of too many of our nation's waterways and sparked passage of the Clean bWater Act in 1972. Great progress has been made over the 27 years since, for the Cuyahoga and many other once dangerously polluted rivers and other bodies of water. Now, says Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Carol Browner, the "last chapter" in water cleanup needs to be written.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which told a congressional hearing June 5 that it would release a comprehensive strategy for cleaning up polluted ground water in the San Gabriel Valley in July, said Thursday that its plan will not be ready until the end of the year. The delay was announced by Daniel W. McGovern, EPA regional administrator, in a letter to Rep. Esteban Torres (D-La Puente), chairman of the House small business subcommittee on environment and labor, which held the June 5 hearing to find out why the EPA is not moving faster on the cleanup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Facing overwhelming opposition to a proposed parcel fee to clean up storm water pollution, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors deferred a vote to place it on the ballot. The proposed fee would be levied on all property owners within the county's flood control district, raising an estimated $290 million a year to help cities and the county deal with widespread water quality issues stemming from polluted storm water and urban runoff - and the resulting threat of fines and litigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
Defense contractor Northrop Grumman Corp. has agreed to spend $21 million to clean up polluted groundwater in the San Gabriel Valley. Under a consent decree settlement announced last week by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the company will pump contaminated water from beneath Industry, La Puente and Walnut; build pipelines; and construct and operate a treatment plant. The area is one of four federal Superfund sites in the San Gabriel Valley, where more than 30 square miles of the water table are polluted with solvents and degreasing agents used for decades by business and industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1998
Regulators from the state Department of Health Services have kept a water treatment plant run by Lockheed-Martin Corp. idle for 10 months. The plant is supposed to be cleaning up ground water tainted by years of defense manufacturing byproducts. The cleanup operation was approved earlier this year by a federal judge and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Lockheed and the city of Burbank, with concurrence of the state Department of Health Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2002 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Martin Corp. was fined $1.38 million by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for improperly operating its water cleanup system in Burbank, officials announced Thursday. Under the terms of a 1992 federal consent decree, Lockheed's Burbank unit was ordered to pump 9,000 gallons per minute from the local aquifer to help purge water supplies of toxic solvents. But the EPA said Lockheed, based in Bethesda, Md.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Robert Greene
Independence Day fell on a Wednesday this year, right in the middle of the week, so it's fair to say that not every Los Angeles County resident was at the top of his or her game the day before, and didn't necessarily scan the agenda of the Board of Supervisors and notice the plan for a special election, early next year, so property owners could decide whether to adopt a new parcel tax to pay for storm water cleanup. But it's coming. Mail-only balloting begins in March, at about the same time as the Los Angeles mayoral and City Council elections (and city attorney and controller and half of the Los Angeles Unified school board and half the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees; and maybe a city sales tax; and maybe up to three more city taxes)
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Robert Greene
As voters mark their ballots Tuesday on three statewide tax measures, it's worth noting that there are many times and many ways to vote on taxes, and we're about to see a bunch of them. In addition to Propositions 30 , 38 and 39 , and  Measure J for Los Angeles County voters, some residents in or near the Santa Monica Mountains are finding that they live in a special district and could be subject to new parcel taxes to pay for parkland maintenance and acquisition. But at least that one will be found at the polling place and on election day, where and when voters would expect to find such a measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2009 | Martha Groves
Veteran surfers joined forces with Malibu city leaders Monday to launch construction of Legacy Park, the centerpiece of the city's $50-million-plus plan to clean up polluted water in Malibu Creek, Malibu Lagoon and the famed Surfrider Beach. "Legacy Park is going to act as Malibu's environmental cleaning machine," said Mayor Andy Stern. "It will reduce pollution from stormwater, improve the city's water quality, and allow residents to enjoy the health and recreation benefits of an open space area and a clean ocean."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
Defense contractor Northrop Grumman Corp. has agreed to spend $21 million to clean up polluted groundwater in the San Gabriel Valley. Under a consent decree settlement announced last week by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the company will pump contaminated water from beneath Industry, La Puente and Walnut; build pipelines; and construct and operate a treatment plant. The area is one of four federal Superfund sites in the San Gabriel Valley, where more than 30 square miles of the water table are polluted with solvents and degreasing agents used for decades by business and industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2006 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board approved a measure Thursday that would impose tougher clean water standards to protect swimmers and surfers at Santa Monica Bay beaches. The regulations, which were enacted to comply with a federal consent decree stemming from lawsuits filed by environmentalists, will make it easier to impose fines and cleanup orders on Los Angeles County and the 13 cities that ring the bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The City Council agreed Friday to spend nearly $49 million in bond funds to remove trash and bacteria from storm water and urban runoff. The money comes from Proposition O, a 2004 city bond measure that raised $500 million to prevent waste and debris in the drainage system from polluting the ocean. The city will use the money for several projects, including one to install 6,000 screens to catch trash and other waste in runoff.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and local authorities, at odds over how best to remedy severe ground water pollution in the San Gabriel Basin, this month are inviting the public to wade into the complicated, highly technical debate with them. Two hearings will focus on differences in proposals by federal environmental officials--who favor building costly central treatment facilities--and local authorities, who want to take a less expensive approach emphasizing treatment of individual wells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2005 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
A divided Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has voted to continue fighting strict rules on cleaning up storm water runoff, opening a new chapter in the long-running legal battle over beach pollution. The vote was met with dismay by environmentalists who have backed efforts by California's regional water boards to impose tough requirements on local governments to clean up storm water pollution, the primary cause of beach closures.
OPINION
May 7, 2005
Finally, some progress is being made on ocean pollution. Regulations are in place, and Los Angeles residents are so keenly aware of the problem that last November they passed Proposition O, a $500-billion bond to clean the toxic substances and bacteria from storm water before it reaches the ocean. Cities far from the beach, though, see curbing ocean pollution as a costly burden with little benefit to them.
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