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NEWS
July 22, 1993 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven days after severe flash-flooding knocked out power and running water here, the heart and soul of this city of 250,000 residents remained on a war footing Wednesday. With the city's water treatment plant and major electrical substations still mostly out of commission, 40,000 downtown workers remained on orders to stay home while crews tried to restore basic sanitation and safety services at major firms and City Hall.
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NATIONAL
June 13, 2008 | From the Chicago Tribune
Officers abandoned the police station Thursday as floodwaters surrounded their headquarters. Elected officials fled City Hall. Boxcars laden with rocks and sand tumbled like toys into the rising Cedar River when a railroad bridge gave way. This city of more than 120,000 people was under siege. By nightfall, 3,000 families were homeless. The Iowa National Guard patrolled to enforce a curfew, and efforts continued to rescue residents. The Cedar River was expected to crest today, but new downpours could mean the crest might not come until at least Sunday, officials said.
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NEWS
July 23, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS; Murphy reported from Kaskaskia, Ill., and Sahagun from Des Moines. Times staff writers Judy Pasternak in Chicago and D'Jamila Salem and Richard E. Meyer in Los Angeles contributed to this story
As a clanging church bell sounded a warning, the Mississippi River crashed through a levee Thursday and wiped out Kaskaskia Island, a historic plug of land that was home to 150 people who held out to the terrible end. In Des Moines, spigots shuddered, then hiccuped and finally gurgled for the first time in 12 days when a flooded-out water plant came to life. Tap water was restored to a quarter of a million people living in the largest city in America to go dry.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS; Murphy reported from Kaskaskia, Ill., and Sahagun from Des Moines. Times staff writers Judy Pasternak in Chicago and D'Jamila Salem and Richard E. Meyer in Los Angeles contributed to this story
As a clanging church bell sounded a warning, the Mississippi River crashed through a levee Thursday and wiped out Kaskaskia Island, a historic plug of land that was home to 150 people who held out to the terrible end. In Des Moines, spigots shuddered, then hiccuped and finally gurgled for the first time in 12 days when a flooded-out water plant came to life. Tap water was restored to a quarter of a million people living in the largest city in America to go dry.
NATIONAL
June 13, 2008 | From the Chicago Tribune
Officers abandoned the police station Thursday as floodwaters surrounded their headquarters. Elected officials fled City Hall. Boxcars laden with rocks and sand tumbled like toys into the rising Cedar River when a railroad bridge gave way. This city of more than 120,000 people was under siege. By nightfall, 3,000 families were homeless. The Iowa National Guard patrolled to enforce a curfew, and efforts continued to rescue residents. The Cedar River was expected to crest today, but new downpours could mean the crest might not come until at least Sunday, officials said.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California and eight other states suing Microsoft Corp. offered a far tougher alternative Friday to the Bush administration's proposed antitrust settlement, setting the stage for a legal showdown between dueling remedy plans. In a filing in U.S. District Court in Washington, the nine states laid out the details of their plan to punish the software giant for breaking antitrust laws, including appointing a special master to monitor the company's anti-competitive behavior.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The coalition of states suing Microsoft Corp. fractured Tuesday with half throwing their support behind a proposed settlement with the Justice Department and most of the rest--led by California--vowing to hold out for tougher terms. The splintering of the 18 states involved in the case represents a victory for Microsoft, which has long sought to chip away at their united front.
NEWS
May 8, 2000 | GEORGE SKELTON
California the big chump! That's how we must look to some Republican muckey-mucks who want us to get back at the end of the line in the presidential nominating process and stay there. They're actually serious about this. These party pooh-bahs are trying to sell the GOP--and California--on a new "reform" that would empower all the tiny states and chain the gorillas, even a 900-pounder. In their scheme, the smallest states would hold primaries first, in early March.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flood waters are now receding in some parts of the water-logged Midwest, but damage and losses from the record flooding may be worse than feared, in some cases triple initial estimates. And while a final assessment is still weeks away, public and private economists are generally boosting their estimates of the deluge's fiscal fallout.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's planting time again in the grain belt, but this season, many farmers like Ron Salge are sowing a revolution of sorts into the soil along with the seed corn and soybeans. Salge has reduced his use of commercial fertilizer by about 25%. He's also gotten stingy with weed-killers, laying them out in narrow strips rather than in broad mists that often blew up his nose and made him nauseous with what folks in Butler County sarcastically call "springtime flu."
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven days after severe flash-flooding knocked out power and running water here, the heart and soul of this city of 250,000 residents remained on a war footing Wednesday. With the city's water treatment plant and major electrical substations still mostly out of commission, 40,000 downtown workers remained on orders to stay home while crews tried to restore basic sanitation and safety services at major firms and City Hall.
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